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3D Printer / CNC discussion thread

sswilson

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It's possible, but the print turned out well enough in spite of the slight curling/warping.

leg brace complete Front.jpg

leg brace complete Rear.jpg

In spite of what the rear image appears to show, the tolerances for the wood are damn near perfect, and my concerns about the carriage bolt holes didn't bear fruit (it's not properly centered, and it's awfully close with the bolt in there, but there's enough clearance).

The only thing I'm not overjoyed with are the side tabs. They ended up a bit higher than I was expecting... there's enough room for the screw at the top (bottom) of the pedestal, but it should by rights be lower so I think I'm going to try to drop it down a bit for the next print, and then decide if I want to re-print the first one based on how that looks. I don't even really have to do that much work to it... there's enough meat there that I can just shave off 3 mm from the top to bring it level with the pedestal, fill in the hole, and then move the hole down 3 mm lower (probably end up closer to the body as well).

That said... I'm super happy with how this turned out!!!! :)
 
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lowfat

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I think everyone has dreams of recycling their filament @ first. But realistically it is FAR from easy. Watch one of the Prusa or Protopasta tour vids and see what their filament extruders look like. They take up like 100ft each as they need a massive amount of space too be cooled and stretched before winding. And yes you do need a machine to wind the filament after extruding. And this is just for pellets. Grinding down parts to a uniform size and you'll still need to mix it with about 60% new material. I think it was CNC Kitchen that had a video on using a prosumer shredder and how much work it was. And this was a $10K CAD unit.

If you are making mechanical parts and don't care what your parts look like, you can probably get away w/ a short DIY winder / cooler. But your filament diameter won't be consistent at all.

I had wanted to do it as well. But gave up after doing research.
 

danmitch1

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Nice print and design @sswilson ! Looks like it will hold up pretty good, solid looking. With some good wood screws the slight misaligned holes will be negligible. Im sure this design has given you more confidence in your modeling skills, at least it should have!

Ive got a similar project in the works for a bike repair stand, im not the best wood worker, so making joints outa plastic is great, especially for angled joints. I just make a mock up in my cad SW, angle the wood as needed, place basically a block of virtual plastic between the 2 pieces of virtual wood and use a boolean function to extract the wood from the plastic.. perfect angle fitted joint. (In my 3d rendering work its not at all a function that is a good idea to use, its also lazy and half assed but it does 3d print perfectly. its also best used when you are done the design as it can create a very unusable, hard to work with mesh. )
123.pngIMG_20200719_124328401.jpgIMG_20200719_124246988.jpgIMG_20200721_111052.jpg

I probably could have used half the plastic, still learning! Ive since printed everything but the top part, Ill definitely spam this thread when its done :p .. Its currently on the back burner to make room for my hotend mount and now tomato anti squirrel cages!

@lowfat , yeah, maybe not for making your own virgin filament, as you mentioned, you could really be wasting your time. But im sure you can get some sort of use out of scrap DIY recycled filament even without mixing in new material. Im not planning on spending a bundle on this idea either, so it will definitely look REALLY fkin ugly lol.. But maybe for printing knick naks, non structural parts, it might come in handy..
Could even build a secondary printer with my extra parts im accumulating just to print recycled crap.. if it jams up, no big deal..
My goal is to just use up the scrap i produce in some sort of beneficial way other than just chucking it. Kinda like when I grow my herb, I dont waste one part of the plant.

Waste not, want not eh!
 
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sswilson

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Nice print and design @sswilson ! Looks like it will hold up pretty good, solid looking. With some good wood screws the slight misaligned holes will be negligible. Im sure this design has given you more confidence in your modeling skills, at least it should have!

Ive got a similar project in the works for a bike repair stand, im not the best wood worker, so making joints outa plastic is great, especially for angled joints. I just make a mock up in my cad SW, angle the wood as needed, place basically a block of virtual plastic between the 2 pieces of virtual wood and use a boolean function to extract the wood from the plastic.. perfect angle fitted joint. (In my 3d rendering work its not at all a function that is a good idea to use, its also lazy and half assed but it does 3d print perfectly. its also best used when you are done the design as it can create a very unusable, hard to work with mesh. )

That looks very much like the process used in most of tinkercad's design workflow (well, how I'm using it anyways... :) ). It's: start with a solid basic shape, and then use a "void" shape to remove the bits you don't want and/or trim it up.

It's sufficient for the basic designs I'm doing, but having the 3 extra profile views as shown in the video would be awesome for lining stuff up, and I suspect higher end software would have better point selection options when it comes to using the software to align parts.

Printing plastic parts to shore up or join different stock material is (IMO) the type of function that could drive 3D printing closer to the mainstream. It's not quite a Star Trek replicator, but it's approaching that functionality.... as with your dishwater part... imagine if manufacturers started making STLs available for older "out of print" parts.
 

danmitch1

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That looks very much like the process used in most of tinkercad's design workflow (well, how I'm using it anyways... :) ). It's: start with a solid basic shape, and then use a "void" shape to remove the bits you don't want and/or trim it up.

It's sufficient for the basic designs I'm doing, but having the 3 extra profile views as shown in the video would be awesome for lining stuff up, and I suspect higher end software would have better point selection options when it comes to using the software to align parts.

Printing plastic parts to shore up or join different stock material is (IMO) the type of function that could drive 3D printing closer to the mainstream. It's not quite a Star Trek replicator, but it's approaching that functionality.... as with your dishwater part... imagine if manufacturers started making STLs available for older "out of print" parts.
Sign up for a home school licence with Autodesk, you'll gain non commercial access to all their software.

Actually, I know LG uses some sort of 3D printer for their AC fan blades. Last year I was cleaning my window AC unit and with the whole thing open, I had it running to dry it out... long story short a rug got caught in the fan and it exploded! So I ordered a new fan blade from LG, it looked to me like it was 3d Printed.. pretty sure not using just any type of plastic but it was definitely not your run of the mill injection mold.
 

sswilson

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Sign up for a home school licence with Autodesk, you'll gain non commercial access to all their software.

Actually, I know LG uses some sort of 3D printer for their AC fan blades. Last year I was cleaning my window AC unit and with the whole thing open, I had it running to dry it out... long story short a rug got caught in the fan and it exploded! So I ordered a new fan blade from LG, it looked to me like it was 3d Printed.. pretty sure not using just any type of plastic but it was definitely not your run of the mill injection mold.

I've already done so and have it installed, but when I first tried it out it was overwhelming while tinkercad was fairly easy and intuitive. I just need the motivation to sit through some instructional vids to get properly started on Autodesk. (It's been a while, but I believe a big part of the issue was my not understanding the concept of drawing the outline in 2D and then extending that into 3D). Hopefully, now that I've got a general idea of how tinkercad works to create a 3D design I'll be able to grasp the concepts of how to start using autodesk.

edit: What I really want/need is a local community college course on basic 3D design manipulation.
 
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danmitch1

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I've already done so and have it installed, but when I first tried it out it was overwhelming while tinkercad was fairly easy and intuitive. I just need the motivation to sit through some instructional vids to get properly started on Autodesk. (It's been a while, but I believe a big part of the issue was my not understanding the concept of drawing the outline in 2D and then extending that into 3D). Hopefully, now that I've got a general idea of how tinkercad works to create a 3D design I'll be able to grasp the concepts of how to start using autodesk.
Nice one, yeah slowly but surely. You will definitely be more accustomed to the workflow now that you learned tinkercad. Its just learning your way around the layout, terminology ect. But youll be using a wayyyy more powerful tool!
 

sswilson

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V2 complete, and the tabs are now perfectly flush with the top(bottom) of the pedestal and screw hole has more meat between it and the top so I'm happy with the outcome.

Gonna go ahead and print off a second one rather than making do with the V1.
 

Mr. Friendly

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who's got the largest print capacity...size wise? I was looking into buying some Robotech / Macross stuff, then dawned on me I could get things 3D printed and likely for a better price.

I ask, as there is one blueprint out there that lets you print multiple pieces to build an SDF-1 Super Dimensional Fortress that's about 2.5ft long. plus lots of other stuff...Veritech's, Destroids, Vertiech Busts, Invid and Zentraedi craft.
 

danmitch1

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who's got the largest print capacity...size wise? I was looking into buying some Robotech / Macross stuff, then dawned on me I could get things 3D printed and likely for a better price.

I ask, as there is one blueprint out there that lets you print multiple pieces to build an SDF-1 Super Dimensional Fortress that's about 2.5ft long. plus lots of other stuff...Veritech's, Destroids, Vertiech Busts, Invid and Zentraedi craft.
I think that depends on your budget. If you want minimal assembly or a diy custom printer.
 
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