What's new
  • Please do not post any links until you have 3 posts as they will automatically be rejected to prevent SPAM. Many words are also blocked due to being used in SPAM Messages. Thanks!

3D Printer / CNC discussion thread

danmitch1

Well-known member
Joined
Dec 15, 2007
Messages
1,509
Is nylon the one that takes crazy temps to print? How do you like the performance of that part fan duct, Im using the same one but not 45' .. seems like it doesnt exactly blow down as is should . How high from the tip of the nozzel do you install it? It looks to me that most have it installed flush to the heat block, like the bottom of the duct flush to the bottom of the heat block.
edit; and those bubbles are from moisture?
 

lowfat

Moderator
Staff member
Joined
Feb 12, 2007
Messages
10,293
Location
Grande Prairie, AB
Is nylon the one that takes crazy temps to print? How do you like the performance of that part fan duct, Im using the same one but not 45' .. seems like it doesnt exactly blow down as is should . How high from the tip of the nozzel do you install it? It looks to me that most have it installed flush to the heat block, like the bottom of the duct flush to the bottom of the heat block.
edit; and those bubbles are from moisture?
This is the Prusa MK3S nozzle and I think its pretty good. I'm using similar Prusa ones on all my printers. It is maybe 1mm above the tip of the nozzle.

I printed this @ 270C / 110C. It is the highest temp filament I've tried so far. The first 10 or so prints failed to adhere to the bed completely and it was a mess. Had to use massive amounts of glue stick. Nylon is hydrophobic so it absorbs water like crazy. Bubbles are caused by water, filament bubbles when it goes through the nozzle as its gets boiled away. With the normal PA6 nylon you can easily print from a dehydrator and it removes the water. Just seems not possible w/ PA12.
 

danmitch1

Well-known member
Joined
Dec 15, 2007
Messages
1,509
The PA12 indicates a denser nylon or?

hmm, do I have to worry about anything when trying to print that high? lets say I want to try that kind of filament.. I Have the max nozzle temp (dragon) set to 280 ( max that my thermistor can read) and have the stock ender 5 power supply..

Right, so this is way too high eh? that what I was thinking..
123.png
 

lowfat

Moderator
Staff member
Joined
Feb 12, 2007
Messages
10,293
Location
Grande Prairie, AB
The PA12 indicates a denser nylon or?

hmm, do I have to worry about anything when trying to print that high? lets say I want to try that kind of filament.. I Have the max nozzle temp (dragon) set to 280 ( max that my thermistor can read) and have the stock ender 5 power supply..

Right, so this is way too high eh? that what I was thinking..
View attachment 29648
Have to worry about parts of the hotend mount melting lol. It is why I am printing these parts.

Mine is a tad lower. I have ever so slightly higher than the tip of the nozzle.



This is crazy.
https://www.reddit.com/r/3Dprinting/comments/iytucl
 

danmitch1

Well-known member
Joined
Dec 15, 2007
Messages
1,509
Have to worry about parts of the hotend mount melting lol. It is why I am printing these parts.

Mine is a tad lower. I have ever so slightly higher than the tip of the nozzle.



This is crazy.
https://www.reddit.com/r/3Dprinting/comments/iytucl
Lol gotcha! But like hardware wise, for instance do you think the stock ender 5 power supply is suitable for sustaining 270c+ temps over a long period?

That controller adaptor is Awesome!
 

lcdguy

Well-known member
Folding Team
Joined
Mar 17, 2007
Messages
2,219
Location
An undisclosed location
Also if you are printing at temps over 230c make sure you are using an all metal hot end or at worst a quality ptfe tube that can handle higher temps. ptfe can get nasty above around 250c.

In regards to to melting printer parts, would a silicon sock help with that ? (not sure if it's rated that high or not, i haven't used them a whole lot.)
 

danmitch1

Well-known member
Joined
Dec 15, 2007
Messages
1,509
Also if you are printing at temps over 230c make sure you are using an all metal hot end or at worst a quality ptfe tube that can handle higher temps. ptfe can get nasty above around 250c.

In regards to to melting printer parts, would a silicon sock help with that ? (not sure if it's rated that high or not, i haven't used them a whole lot.)
Yeah thats the thing, I got a new dragon hotend (all metal) with new heat cartridge and thermistor. Im just wondering if all the other stock parts would be ok for printing at such high temps as the stock ender 5 did not come equipped for that type of printing. All I can think of (besides the melting of mounts) is maybe the stock power supply might not be up for the task.

This is all hypothetical really (lowfat got me interested in this from his post above)
as im not planning to print at those temps for the moment but just to make sure Im equipped for when that time comes.
 

sswilson

Moderator
Staff member
Joined
Dec 9, 2006
Messages
19,704
Location
Moncton NB

Mentioned this in another thread (responding to a previous post). Feature set looks pretty good for $750 if you ask me.
 

sswilson

Moderator
Staff member
Joined
Dec 9, 2006
Messages
19,704
Location
Moncton NB
Quick question on setting flow rate in my slicer....

I'm currently getting ready to run my first calibration on this and am wondering how this ties in with the extruder calibration we do for different rolls of filament? Is the flow calibration number going to remain fairly constant through different filaments so long as I'm doing a decent extruder calibration?
 

lowfat

Moderator
Staff member
Joined
Feb 12, 2007
Messages
10,293
Location
Grande Prairie, AB
You calibrate your steps per mm on your extruder every new roll of filament? The only time I'll ever touch that if I replace parts on the extruder. All stepper steps/mm really should be static values that don't change.

I also never touch flow rate from roll to roll either, unless I notice an issue. Unless you are buying ultra high end filament, the entire roll of filament won't be consistent anyways. So the part you are measuring and adjusting flow could be substantially different.

For each filament type (not brand), I'll do my best to calibrate flow via an empty box w/ 2 walls then measure and adjust flow rate to compensate. But unless you are using high end calipers like Mitutoyo, you won't get the exact repeatability anyways to get this really exact anyways IMO.
 

Latest posts

Twitter

Top