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Acer Predator XB270HU G-SYNC Monitor Review

AkG

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Oct 24, 2007
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After many, many years of only incremental improvements consisting of nothing more than 'the new generation is 1ms faster than the last' PC gaming section monitors are finally starting to advance at a pace that does justice to the first person shooter genre. For the first time in memory consumers can now get a mid-priced, high-resolution monitor that can potentially provide equally impressive performance in and out of gaming scenarios.

Arguably the largest motivator behind these latest advancements is NVIDIA and their G-SYNC technology. Without getting mired into the G-SYNC vs Freesync debate it is suffice to say that this new monitor technology has allowed slower IPS panels to perform as good if not better than typical TN monitors in gaming tasks. In the recent past we have taken a look at a few examples, but for one reason or another they mainly fell short of their intended goal of being equally comfortable outside of gaming scenarios. The Acer XB270HU intends to change that and impress as wide a range of consumers as possible.

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With an asking price of $750, this 27-inch 2560x1440 resolution monitor certainly starts off on the right foot - as this is very similar to what some other non-GSYNC enabled 1440P monitors retail for. This price alone also puts it at a distinct advantage over the first generation ASUS RoG Swift which, even though it is a TN based option, still retails for $20 more than the Acer XB270HU.

This monitor however is not just about being reasonably priced. Instead the middle of the road asking price is simply another example of Acer trying to offer consumers the best value they can. In order to do precisely that Acer hasn't opted for a TN panel and instead the Acer XB270HU makes use of an 8-bit IPS based panel that allows this monitor to have a wide color gamut that should impress the amateur photographer in all of us.

More importantly even though this monitor uses an IPS panel, this IPS panel is capable of 144Hz refresh rates. This alone makes the Acer Predator XB270HU rather interesting, however it is the combination if 144HZ, IPS instead of TN based panel, and G-SYNC abilities that allow it to compete against both the typical TN based 144Hz monitors and 60Hz professional monitor.

It is this unique blend of high resolution IPS panel, G-SYNC technology, and a reasonable asking price the Acer is counting on to win consumers over. If past attempts at such a lofty goal are any indication Acer does have their work cut out for them - as it will have to impress both the PC gaming orientated side of the market as well as the more professionally orientated half. If however it can actually win over both groups of consumers Acer will be one of the first companies to offer such massive value to consumers.

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AkG

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A Closer Look at the Acer Predator XB270HU

A Closer Look at the Acer Predator XB270HU


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The XB270HU is first and foremost a gaming-orientated monitor, but Acer has taken a rather conservative approach its overall design. Excluding the red ring thick red stripe encircling the stand’s connection to its base this is an entirely black monitor without any design flourishes.

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Hidden underneath this rather unexciting exterior is a lot of extremely cutting edge technology. As with the BenQ XL2420G, the XB270HU uses a 144Hz panel and boasts both ULMB and G-SYNC. Ultra Low Motion Blur allows for a fairly crisp looking image for consumers who do not have G-SYNC capable video cards whereas G-SYNC allows for perfect timing between screen refreshes and your video card’s output. Make sure to read out full G-SYNC overview HERE.

Unlike the BenQ XL2420G, Acer’s XB270HU eschews the usual 1080P TN approach and instead utilizes a 1440P IPS panel. Even though it was launched months ago, this remains one of the few G-SYNC enabled monitors that uses an 8-bit IPS panel.

back_sm.jpg

Instead of bracing the form over function approach so many other vendors seem addicted to, Acer went with a rather thick design. These increased internal dimensions allow for larger internal heatsinks and in conjunction with copious cooling slits should allow this monitor to stay cool even after extended gaming marathons.

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To help reinforce the idea of this monitor being targeted towards gamers its base has some wide ranging abilities. It offers an impressive 150mm of height adjustment, 40° of tilt (+5° to -35°), excellent swivel and even portrait mode capabilities. This is actually more than what many competitors offer.

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There are really only two issues we take with this design's abilities. First and foremost, users will have to take care when transitioning to and from portrait mode. As with many similar designs, this panel will scrape along its bottom right corner unless you first tilt it all the way back and raise it to full height extension before trying to change orientation. This is very common amongst 27-inch monitors but still less than optimal on such an expensive product.

ang2_sm.jpg

The second issue however is a bit more serious: the anti-glare coating Acer has used is a touch dated in comparison to what other companies apply. While it does indeed reduce glare, at times the coating was quite noticeable and negatively impacted image clarity and color rendering.

On the positive side the Acer XB270HU makes use of actual physical buttons instead of touch based capacitive sensors. These buttons simply respond better and have a tactile feel that capacitive options cannot match. With the being said their flimsy nature did not instill the same level of confidence in their long term durability.

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The input category is also rather limited as Acer only includes a single DisplayPort port due to the limitations of NVIDIA’s G-SYNC module. If your video card only has HDMI or DVI outputs, you will have to invest in aftermarket adapters.

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On the positive side, Acer does include four USB 3.0 ports. More importantly two of these ports are located on the side of the monitor where they can easily be reached and used.
 
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AkG

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Menu Layout & Observations

Menu Layout & Observations


Even though this monitor sports an IPS panel and costs well north of $700 USD, its OSD leaves much to be desired. That is not to say that the On Screen Display is terrible, nor is it the worst we have ever tried to use. Instead it is simply a very simplified OSD with very few features but the ones which are present should still appeal to gamers.

<div align="center">
<img src="http://images.hardwarecanucks.com/image/akg/Monitor/XB270HU/menu_basic.jpg" border="0" alt="" />
</div>

The first options list will cover nearly all the needs of gamers nicely and makes entering the actual OSD unnecessary. Since this is the first thing you encounter when trying to access the OSD the Acer XB270HU does give a very good first impression. Pressing any of the buttons brings up a small shortcut type list with the most likely options a user will want to adjust more than once. From left to right these features are: 'Empowering', Brightness, OverDrive, ULMB, and Menu.

<div align="center">
<img src="http://images.hardwarecanucks.com/image/akg/Monitor/XB270HU/empower.jpg" border="0" alt="" />
</div>

Selecting the oddly named Empowering feature brings up a submenu of options that consist of the eColor Management's list of built-in presets. If you want to change the preset you are currently using to one of the other four presets this is the feature for you. .

The presets themselves are extremely basic and consist of: User Mode or fully manual control mode, ECO mode, or what is basically extreme power saving mode and a Standard setting is the default. Standard is the jack of all trades preset that doesn't tend to highlight any one feature over any of the others.

Graphic mode is supposed to appeal to photographers and videographers but in reality it just over-saturates the image and it really won't appeal to content editors. The last mode is Movie Mode and messes with color fidelity too much to be overly usable. It may not be perfect, but User Mode is the most adaptable and the one most users will gravitate towards after playing with the other less than optimal presets.

<div align="center">
<img src="http://images.hardwarecanucks.com/image/akg/Monitor/XB270HU/bright.jpg" border="0" alt="" />
</div>

The next option is the brightness setting, and as expected it allows you to directly control the output of the panel's backlight. Considering this monitor's default setting is 100% - or 351.02cd/m2 - you will indeed want to lower this to a more reasonable amount ASAP. The OverDrive feature allows you to set the monitors overdrive abilities to either off, Normal, or Extreme mode.

<div align="center">
<img src="http://images.hardwarecanucks.com/image/akg/Monitor/XB270HU/ulmb.jpg" border="0" alt="" />
</div>

ULMB stands for Ultra Low Motion Blur and if you are not using a G-SYNC enabled video card you will most likely want to set this up right after lowering the brightness - as it reduces onscreen blur and input lag. If however you do have a G-SYNC capable video card ULMB is a lot less important and in fact does not work in parallel with G-SYNC. However for AMD users this will certainly prove to be a boon as in testing it did noticeably make for a better gaming experience when paired to two XFX R9 280X TDFD video cards - even if it does limit your maximum refresh rate to 100Hz. With that being said, AMD users should be looking at FreeSync-compatible monitors rather than this one.

<div align="center">
<img src="http://images.hardwarecanucks.com/image/akg/Monitor/XB270HU/menu_pic.jpg" border="0" alt="" />
</div>

The last section is where you enter the main On Screen Display. It is also where things go off the rails and will quickly leave you wanting more. The actual OSD consists of the quick list options and a few extra features in a four deep options / menu list. These four are Picture Quality adjustments, OSD setting adjustments, Miscellaneous, and Product Information.

<div align="center">
<img src="http://images.hardwarecanucks.com/image/akg/Monitor/XB270HU/menu_osd.jpg" border="0" alt="" />
</div>

If there's a need to know your monitor's serial number, simply go to the Product Information tab and it will be right there. Want to change the timeout of the On Screen Display? Not a problem; the OSD settings section covers that. Want to fine-tune the gamma, or use 6-axis color correction to make the color profile perfect? Huston we have a problem. Acer has literally dedicated <i>half</i> the menu to two things that could have easily been sub-menu items and the other half is severely lacking.

<div align="center">
<img src="http://images.hardwarecanucks.com/image/akg/Monitor/XB270HU/menu_misc.jpg" border="0" alt="" />
</div>

For most consumers two of these four settings will never be touched, which leaves two sections to cram an entire OSD and advanced features into. This obviously is not possible and instead Acer opted to make their OSD so simple and easy to understand that even first time users will not be confused or stuck searching for advanced features. Unfortunately, this is because there really are no advanced features. The best you can do is choose from presets for the gamma, and use User Mode to modify the color temperature. Yes, this means you can also forget about adjusting the color temperature in <i>Kelvins</i>. For fine tune control over color correction - the User Mode at least allows you to individually adjust the Red, Green, or Blue channels, but that is a far, far cry from 6-axis color correction.

Honestly, this On Screen Display does not belong on such a high end monitor. The XB270HU deserves all the stops to be pulled out like ASUS does with their own RoG Swift series
 
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AkG

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Image Quality (Uniformity, Panel, & Gamma Performance)

Image Quality (Uniformity / Panel & Gamma Performance)


Calibrated Settings

Please remember that the settings below have been calibrated for our specific environment and your viewing conditions may differ from ours.

Mode Used: "User Mode"

Notes:
- All tests done at default settings at 120 cd/m2.
- Unless otherwise noted, the tests were carried out via DisplayPort or HDMI


Panel Uniformity


In a perfect world a screen’s brightness output would be equal throughout the entire panel. This is not a perfect world, but the lower the variation the less chances you will notice overly bright or dark sections on the screen. For the consumer LCD marketplace a variance of 10% is our gold standard but anything below 15% can be considered excellent as we doubt anyone will notice a -7.5 to +7.5 variation. A variation above 15% but below 24% can be considered adequate, but anything above this does not meet our basic minimum standards.

uniform.jpg

This is one area the XB270HU is rather middle of the road in its results. While range of 16% is OK for a 27-inch monitor it could be better. At this price point we would have liked to have seen single digit variance. By the same token we doubt anyone will notice this variance across such a large amount of real-estate.


Panel Performance


In a perfect world a screen’s real world response rate would be so high that motion blur, ‘ghosting’, ‘reverse-ghosting’ would be a thing of the past. No matter how fast the action on screen all images would be represented in pristine condition similar in quality to a static image. This is not a perfect world, but the less amounts of blurring which occurs the less chances you will notice the issue in real world scenarios. While the panels response rate (ms) and and frame rate (Hz) can give a fairly rough idea of how much blurring to expect it is not the end all and be all.

To this end we have taken PRAD’s Pixel Persistence Analyzer ‘Streaky Pictures’ program and using a high speed camera captured exactly how much and what kind of motion blur you can expect from a given monitor.


blur.jpg


If you want to point towrds tangible proof of what G-SYNC can really do, all you need is look at the XM270HU's results here. It may not be absolutely perfect (there's a slight amount of motion judder), but unless you routinely use a high-speed camera to photograph your screen in action we doubt you will ever notice anything but crystal clear images. This is so close to being perfect that the car almost seems to be moving lackadaisically from one side to the other. The fact that an IPS panel is able to do this is just icing on the cake.



Gamma Performance


Gamma correction is one of the hardest terms to explain. However, for our purposes the gamma correction of any electronics device is how bright or dark an image will be displayed on a screen.

All PC devices now use 2.20 gamma as the default. Any variance from this will result in an image being either underexposed which will create black crush and underexposed shadow detail or washed out with too little black level detail (aka being over-exposed).

While 2.20 is the gold standard, a minor deviation of 0.10 will in all likelihood never be noticed by anyone other than professional photographers. Higher levels of deflection however will be noticed by just about everyone.


gamma.jpg

These results are not perfect, but they will be close enough for all but the most demanding of consumers. This is certainly a good thing as you will have to resort to a colorimeter if you ever need to change the gamma as the OSD's gamma features are terribly lacking.
 
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AkG

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Colour Saturation Levels / Default RGB Levels

Colour Saturation Levels


<i>While there are numerous colors the human eye can’t “see”, the human color space confined to three primary colors and combinations thereof. To make things easier for manufactures (and not waste resources displaying colors we can’t see) a color space was mathematically described and while various models do exist, the CIE RGB color space is the de facto standard.

In the below image, the dark triangle which isn’t highlighted is the sRGB color space while the overall CIE color space is displayed as the background colors. Meanwhile, the white triangle with highlighted color represents the results of what a given monitor can display. No monitor can display the entire CIE color spectrum but a good monitor should be able to display the sRGB spectrum of possible colors as this is usually used as the standard for image encoding.

A monitor which uses the “wide color gamut” moniker can display more than the sRGB spectrum and is considered primarily for professional use. If a monitor cannot cover off the entire sRGB triangle, the resulting image will appear “off” to an observer. The end result is a picture displayed on the panel which won’t be as rich, vibrant or as correct as it should be. </i>

<div align="center">
<img src="http://images.hardwarecanucks.com/image/akg/Monitor/XB270HU/cie.jpg" border="0" alt="" />
</div>

We would have been disappointed with anything less than an impressively wide color gamut. Thankfully we were not disappointed. As is becoming a reoccurring theme, these results certainly are not be the best we have ever seen, but it is in an entirely different league than what most TN panels can accomplish. Unless you are professional photographer and demand the widest color gamut you can find, the XB270HU will offer more than you will ever need.


Default RGB Levels


<i>An LCD or LCD LED backlit panel relies on accurately blending Red, Green and Blue pixel clusters to create an overall image so closer to each of these colours is to a “perfect” 100 output, the better and more accurate the default colors will be.

In this case, we have a low tolerance for anything less than perfection since any color shift can be noticeable even to untrained eyes and will require a color correction be applied at the software level to overcome a monitor’s stock output. We do however consider a minor variation of only a few points per color to be acceptable. </i>

<div align="center"><img src="http://images.hardwarecanucks.com/image/akg/Monitor/XB270HU/rgb.jpg" border="0" alt="" /></div>

These results are a touch disappointing given the OSD's deficiencies when it comes to adjusting RGB levels. With that being said, there are some possible ways to improve these default settings.
 
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AkG

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Viewing Angles / Contrast Ratio / Power Consumption

Viewing Angles


Unlike CRT displays, the manner in which LCD panels create an image can result in one large weakness: the image can lose contrast when viewed off angle. While we do not recommend watching an LCD at anything besides perfectly straight on, the reality is this cannot always be done.

To help give you a glimpse of what a panel will look like when seen from either above the horizontal or vertical plane we have taken pictures at fairly extreme angles.


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IPS always have exceptional viewing angles and the XB270HU is no exception. There is a touch of color shifting in off-horizontal viewing, but it is rather minor until you hit rather extreme angles. Off center vertical viewing resulted in more contrast loss than color shifting but once again at most angles it too is not significant until extreme angles are encountered. Overall we would classify these as pretty typical results from a 8bit IPS W-LED backlit monitor.


Maximum Contrast Ratio


While manufactures love to throw around “maximum” contrast ratios in the millions, the fact of the matter is that to get these high numbers they have to use "dynamic contrast" which—at best—results in overly optimistic specs. With DC turned off, the number of shades between purest white and blackest black a given monitor can display is usually in the low hundreds rather than the thousands.

The higher the contrast ratio, the better the monitor will display shades of dark and light. For IPS monitors, anything below 450:1 is unacceptable, with 500:1 or above considered optimal. For TN anything above 120:1 will be considered “good enough” for most consumers.


contrast.jpg

This model uses an 8-bit IPS panel rather than a 10-bit or higher panel so these results were to be expected. Put simply the XB270HU doesn’t have the best contrast ratio we have ever seen, but neither does it trail the pack. More importantly, when compared to most G-SYNC monitors which use TN panels, these numbers are simply in a different league.


Power Consumption


To obtain the maximum number we set the monitors brightness to 100% and the contrast to 100%. The Calibrated results are taken at 120 cd/m2 with the contrast set to the default level.

power.jpg

Overall the power consumption of this 27-inch monitor is pretty decent but past that there's not much to comment about here.
 
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AkG

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Gaming & Movie Perforamnce

Gaming Performance


Gaming is the bread and butter of any G-SYNC equipped monitor and that’s what you pay for. In short, G-SYNC is meant to eliminate the judder, tearing and motion blur that typically accompany PC gaming but without the performance sacrifices incurred by V-SYNC. Faster 144Hz monitors without adaptive synchronization did eliminate some of those issues but NVIDIA’s technology flat out stops them from ever occurring.

We’ve already delved into both G-SYNC and AMD’s competing FreeSync and have come to a pretty straightforward conclusion: they can both completely change the way we visually experience games. Acer’s XB270HU takes this to the next level by adding in an IPS panel that operates at 144Hz and the end result is just pure nirvana.

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Even experienced gamers will be impressed by what this monitor can accomplish. Like many I typically use dual monitor setup: one for work and one for play. For work related tasks and games where motion clarity takes a back seat to a rich and ultra wide color pallet there’s a Dell UltraShrap U2713H. The other monitor is a G-SYNC enabled ASUS ROG SWIFT PG278Q for first person shooters and other scenarios where its TN panel can be used to the maximum of its abilities.

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Compared to the existing setup, Acer’ XB270HU is a breath of fresh air since it can pull double duty in both high end gaming and photo editing environments. While it would never be the first choice for a professional photographer who would likely see benefits of a 10-bit or higher IPS panel, in gaming and even typical day to day scenarios such as word processing it simply blows the original RoG Swift out of the water. Meanwhile, it can offer motion clarity that typical IPS monitors like the UltraSharp U2713H - could never match.

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The XB270HU really is phenomenal in a multitude of gaming related tasks. If your genre of choice is first person shooters, the combination of ultra-high response rate with G-SYNC means that you will likely have the best, most immersive gaming experience of your life.

Even if you don’t have the video card horsepower to take advantage of the 144Hz attributes, as long as you have enough horsepower to keep the minimum frame rates above your personal threshold of enjoyment, nine times out of ten you will never miss the 'missing' performance. Games will still have that buttery smoothness that usually is reserved for high end SLI systems, and you will honestly think - if you ever take think about it - that the frame rates are a lot higher than they really are.

In RTS games where image quality is king, the XB270HU simply annihilates all TN panels and almost matches 10-bit panels like the UltraSharp U2713H. In addition it can do both while costing less than either one of those two monitors will set you back. To us it may not be best in class in all scenarios but it does offer one heck of a combination of value and performance

Quite honestly the only way Acer could have made this 1440P monitor even better is if they had opted for a 10-bit IPS panel instead of 8-bit. Unfortunately that isn’t possible since 144Hz 10-bit panels will only be sampling later this year.

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While I cannot see replacing my UltraSharp for high level video and photo processing, the RoG SWIFT may be on its way out. You may feel differently and if I didn’t already own the U2713H, justifying both would be damn difficult - with the Acer being the obvious first purchase.


Movie Performance


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While not absolutely perfect, the out of the box default color profile is more than adequate and only professionals who demand perfection will find fault with the Acer XB270HU's colors within movies. This assumes you are like most people and prefer a warm color pallet to a cool one. If you do care about seeing a movie the way it was meant to be viewed you probably will want to modify the stock colors. Otherwise skin tones will seem a touch too rosy for your liking.

m3_sm.jpg

It quickly became obvious that in movie and multimedia scenarios this monitor's strongest attribute was the panel Acer opted for, and its largest weakness is also that that selfsame panel. This may seem like a contradiction in terms, but the simple fact of the matter is the IPS panel gives this gaming monitor a deep, rich, and vibrant color pallet that cannot even be compared to any TN monitors. By the same token its 8-bit depth and lackluster advanced features means that it also cannot fairly be compared to higher end displays such as those from ASUS or Dell. The results were still very enjoyable and extremely immersive, but if you have ever used a 10-bit AH-IPS based monitor you will find the Acer to be a significant downgrade.

m1_sm.jpg

Watching 1080P movies on this monitor will result in a certain amount of upscaling. Normally there isn’t anything to complain about but it seemed like Acer’s hardware handled this function poorly compared to some other 1440P monitors we have looked at in the past. This issue is further exacerbated with lower bit rate videos, and becomes more apparent at 720P resolutions regardless of bitrate.
 
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AkG

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Non-Colorimeter Tweaking and Results

Non-Colorimeter Tweaking and Results


<i>In a perfect world either every monitor would come factory calibrated to perfection or every single consumer would own a decent colorimeter. We don’t live in such a world and as such most consumers simply use the old Mark 1 Mod 0 eyeball to fix any imperfections with the stock colors of their new monitor.

In order to gauge how easy this is to do for a given monitor we have included a new set of tests. These tests will be carried out before any of our standard tests and will consist of us using a combination of the free online LCD Monitor Test Images (found here LCD monitor test images) and then if necessary the free Hex2Bit Monitor Calibration Wizard (found here Hex2Bit - Software by Mike Walters). The goal of these tests is to not only gauge how easy it is to accurately calibrate a given monitor using only the onboard monitor tools, but to see how closely we can come to what a Spyder3 Elite can do. </i>


To obtain these results we did the following

- used “user" mode
- adjusted the brightness to 24 (which resulted in a 121.7 cd/m2)
- adjusted Red to 54
- adjusted Green to 50
- adjusted Blue to 49
- All other settings left to default levels

<div align="center">
<img src="http://images.hardwarecanucks.com/image/akg/Monitor/XB270HU/man_gamma.jpg" border="0" alt="" />
<img src="http://images.hardwarecanucks.com/image/akg/Monitor/XB270HU/man_rgb.jpg" border="0" alt="" />
</div>

When trying to manually adjust the default color profile of the UX270HU the very first thing that needs to be done is to determine which of the presets to use. This will greatly impact how much adjusting can be done via the OSD. We strongly recommend the User Mode as it offers the best default color profile, and the most options, which will make life infinitely easier.

Color Temp should then be navigated to through Picture Adjustment and then Acer Color Management. This is where a user-based input can be chosen for Red, Green, or Blue levels individually. Once things are modified, the monitor achieved reasonably good results for an IPS panel.
 
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AkG

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Conclusion

Conclusion


The conclusions in our G-SYNC monitor reviews have typically followed a preset path: the offerings offered superlative gaming experiences but fell woefully short in color reproduction, contrast and viewing angles. While those TN panel-based foibles can be overlooked by many gamers, there’s a subset of users that want excellent picture quality alongside their gaming fix. This is where Acer’s XB270HU steps into the equation in a big way.

On paper the XB270HU seems to offer everything we could possibly want from high end gaming-first monitor: a 144Hz refresh rate, fast pixel response times, a ULMB feature and G-SYNC compatibility. If the buck stopped there, we’d have an excellent solution on our hands. However Acer went to the next level by also including a 27” IPS panel and a high resolution of 1440P, making the XB270HU one of only a handful of offerings to offer both gaming chops and excellent image fidelity.

In practice the awesome duo of 144Hz IPS and G-SYNC is like a dream come true. While the XB270HU can’t hope to match the color reproduction capabilities of 10-bit and higher IPS panels, it still offers excellent color accuracy, broad viewing angles and very good contrast ratios that blow every single TN-based competitor out of the water. G-SYNC then steps in and provides tear and judder-free motion fluidity that has to be experienced to be believed.

This really is the best of both worlds but it will cost you a pretty penny. The Acer XB270HU is actually one of the least expensive 27” IPS-based G-SYNC monitors available but it is still a good $150 to $200USD more expensive than similarly sized 60Hz 10-bit IPS monitors. Naturally, those products can’t even be considered an alternative for the gaming crowd since they’re entirely too slow but it does go to show the premium being paid for a 144Hz panel and G-SYNC.

While the amount of praise we can heap upon the XB270HU’s duality is next to endless, things tend to fall by the wayside when discussing its back-of-house functionality. Whereas this monitor is priced like a premium product, its OSD feels better matched to an entry level offering. It feels dated, contrived and lacks the gaming features seen on offerings from BenQ, ASUS and others. Luckily users will access it once or twice, optimize the settings to their liking and never look at it again.

If you are in the market for a high resolution G-SYNC monitor but don’t want to throw image quality out the window by going down the TN panel route, the XB270HU should be at the top of your list. Granted, there may be some enticing monitors on the horizon that are larger, curved or offer a longer feature set but what Acer has here will likely remain one of the best solutions for those who cannot afford a $900 or higher alternative.

<div align="center"><img src="http://images.hardwarecanucks.com/image/akg/Monitor/XB270HU/di.png" border="0" alt="" />
</div>
 
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