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ASRock X370 Taichi AM4 Motherboard Review

MAC

Associate Review Editor
Joined
Nov 8, 2006
Messages
1,141
Location
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So the AMD Ryzen 7 launch was about 3 weeks ago now, and needless to say that it was a little rocky. There were controversies over benchmarking results, controversies over whether Windows properly supported this new microarchitecture, and a whole lot of hyped-up consumers wondering where the hell they could buy an X370 motherboard. Those few that managed to get ahold of a motherboard were rewarded with UEFIs that were incredibly immature and lacking common settings, iffy memory overclocking, and some motherboards just spontaneously dropped dead.

While the stock situation has not changed much, the UEFIs have been updated at a steady pace, and they have improved enough for us to now be willing to start releasing our X370 motherboard reviews. Since this is the first X370 AM4 motherboard that we have reviewed, there is nothing that we can directly compare it to. However, that doesn't stop us from highlighting the great job that ASRock have done with the mighty X370 Taichi.

Going down the specs list, we see that this model has a robust 16-phase CPU power design, a pretty incredible ten SATA 6Gb/s ports, two M.2 slots - though only one is full-speed, two physical PCI-E 3.0 x16 slots with support for 2-way SLI or CrossFireX, two PCI-E 2.0 x1 slots, and one mechanical PCI-E x16 slot that actually operates at PCI-E 2.0 x4. With USB functionality built directly into both the CPU and the chipset, that form of connectivity is well-represented on this new platform, and it shows on this motherboard with two full-speed USB 3.1 ports, one Type-A and one Type-C, six USB 3.0 ports, two USB 3.0 headers, and two USB 2.0 headers for a grand total of sixteen possible USB ports.

When it comes to networking, there is one Intel-powered gigabit LAN port and even onboard Intel 802.11ac Wi-Fi solution with Bluetooth 4.2. As have come to expect from a motherboard in this price range, it even has a legit onboard audio solution, comprised of a Realtek ALC1220 codec, Texas Instruments op-amp, Nichicon audio-grade capacitors, five analog audio jacks and a digital S/PDIF output. Regrettably, those who plan on using AMD's upcoming Zen-based APUs should look else where, since this model has no video outputs whatsoever. That is a rarity among X370 motherboards, but we can appreciate that ASRock have built this motherboard with a focus on fully-fledged Ryzen processors.

As has become an apparent requirement, this model has RGB LED lighting built-in, but it is confined to four LEDs placed under the chipset cooler. That is relatively little lighting compared to the competition, but ASRock have added an impressive three RGB LED headers, so users can definitely take matters into their own hands and create quite the light show if desired. While were are on the topic of headers, this model has two CPU fan headers and three system fan headers that are fully controllable via both DC and PWM fan control modes from within the UEFI. The secondary CPU fan headers also supports water pumps.

So hardware-wise this motherboard has just about everything that we could want, our job is now to see whether it has all been well implemented, how it handles overclocking, and if it's a good deal at its current retail price of $200 USD / $335 CAD.

 

MAC

Associate Review Editor
Joined
Nov 8, 2006
Messages
1,141
Location
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Packaging & Accessories

Packaging & Accessories


Now that we have gone over the X370 Taichi 's features and specifications, it is time to examine the packaging and then crack open the box to take a look at the bundled accessories. Let's check it out:



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It should come as no surprise that the X370 Taichi's packaging looks exceptionally similar to that of the X99 Taichi. We have no complaints about it, since nothing else on the market looks similar.

The front of the packaging is adorned with the usual array of AMD-related badges and logos, while the back of the box is packed with all the features that make this particular model unique in some way. There is also a nice specifications list, as well as a handy diagram highlighting the connectivity on the rear I/O panel.



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Once you remove the outside packaging, you are greeted with an inner box - with a handle - that contains two separate sections, the top half contains the accessories, software and documentation, while the bottom half holds the motherboard in an anti-static bag.

Usually, we have nothing more to say about how the motherboard is packaged, but ASRock have upped the game by protecting it in a nice foam cradle and also securing it with zip ties. We have never seen a motherboard this well protected from the bumps and bruises of shipping.



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The X370 Taichi's accessories bundle is small, but the basics are there. There is a bunch of documentation, a ASRock sticker, and the driver/software DVD. There are four SATA 6Gb/s cables (which is a little stingy given the ten SATA ports), a rear I/O panel cover, two Wi-Fi antennas, and a screw for installing an M.2 SSD.

Although it wasn't included in our review sample, retail packages will ship with a free SLI HB Bridge, which is a pretty sweet bonus.
 

MAC

Associate Review Editor
Joined
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Messages
1,141
Location
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A Closer Look at the X370 Taichi

A Closer Look at the X370 Taichi




When we look at the ASRock X370 Taichi - and quite a few other X370 motherboards - we can't help but be amused at how they were all influenced by the forefather of the white shroud/black PCB movement: the ASUS X99-DELUXE. It's a look that you either love or hate, and if you hate it then hopefully you like black and red because otherwise your AM4 motherboard choices are going to narrow significantly. Either way, ASRock have definitely make this motherboards standout thanks to the crazy amount of white silk-screening on the black PCB. It's a really strinking looking model.

This motherboard is based on the conventional full-size ATX form factor - 30.5 cm x 24.4 cm / 12.0-in x 9.6-in - so there are no compatibility issues to worry about with any properly designed case. The overall layout is very well-thought-out and there are no critical shortcomings that we can point out. All the headers, connectors, and ports are easily accessible and free from possible obstruction.

We definitely appreciate the fact that there is a huge amount of space between two primary PCI-E x16 slots, so there won’t be any issues fitting thick dual or even triple-slot graphics cards on this motherboard. We also like the fact that they have managed to fit two M.2 slots, which is a feature that we have gotten used to on Intel Z270 motherboards, and which not every X370 model has.



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When dealing with highly clocked octa-core processors, power handling is important. Thankfully, the ASRock X370 Taichi delivers in spades. It features a 16-phase CPU power design that utilizes an Infineon IR35201 digital PWM controller, sixteen Texas Instruments CSD87350Q5D NexFET MOSFETs backed by eight Infineon IR3598 dual drivers/doublers, excellent higher current 60A power chokes, and Nichicon 12K Platinum capacitors. We suspect that 12 of the doubled phases are dedicated towards the cores, while the remaining 4 are for the SOC (system-on-chip), which is consists of the memory controller, PCI-E controller, and on-die USB and SATA controllers.

ASRock claims that this power design can handle up to 300W, and based on the components we are inclined to agree. This is probably the beefiest VRM on any X370 motherboard, and if you're planning on overclocking a Ryzen processor, you will want to consider this as an important selling point.

By the way, helping cool these sixteen MOSFETs are two solid aluminium heatsink connected together by a heatpipe. And when it comes time to cooling the processor, there are two CPU fan headers that are fully controllable via both DC and PWM fan control modes from within the UEFI, and one of them supports water pumps with a maximum current draw of 1.5A.


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The four DDR4 memory slots are clipless on the left side, regulated by a two phase VRM, support up to 64GB of total system memory, and they have been certified for overclocked memory speeds of up to DDR4-3200. Make sure to check out our Overclocking Results section to see whether we were able to hit that level.

ASRock are also advertising support for both non-ECC and ECC and unbuffered memory, and although all the elements are in place for this platform to support ECC, we are still investigating whether it is currently enabled and functional.

The 24-pin ATX power connector is exactly where it would be on any other motherboard, and we also like the positioning of the two USB 3.0 headers.


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Those two USB 3.0 headers can add up to four USB 3.0 ports to the front of your case, which is a pretty solid number. This Ryzen + X370 platform is interesting from a USB connectivity standpoint, since not only do the processors natively feature four USB 3.0 ports, but the chipset can handle two full-speed USB 3.1 Gen2 ports, ten USB 3.0 ports, and six USB 2.0 ports. That is twenty total USB ports, but the X370 Taichi 'only' has sixteen, half of which come in the form of headers.


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This new AM4 platform has no native BCLK control at the moment, so ASRock have added an external base clock generator - otherwise known as their Hyper BCLK Engine II - to this motherboard in order to give users the ability to select a base clock between 100MHz and 136Mhz. While most overclocking will still be done via adjusting the multipliers since they are unlocked on all Ryzen processors, this BCLK control will definitely help fine-tune overclocks.


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Directly below the CPU socket is one of the two M.2 slots, and the only one of which to feature a full-speed PCI-E 3.0 x4 interface thanks to its direct connection to the processor. It has a theoretical maximum bandwidth of 4GB/s, and supports SATA, PCI-E, and PCI-E NVMe M.2 solid state drives that measure up to 80mm long. It does not appear that you can RAID the two M.2 slots together, and as we will show in our feature test page, you really would not want to anyways.

Since PCI-E lanes are rather limited on this platform, if you occupy this M.2 slot the NXP L04083B PCI-E 3.0 switches will do their job and disable the second PCI-E x1 slot.


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While the X370 chipset technically only supports six SATA 6Gb/s ports, it also supports two SATA Express ports. Manufacturers who very wisely decide to avoid SATA Express can repurpose that connectivity into additional SATA 6Gb/s ports. That is what ASRock have done on the X370 Taichi, and they have also added an ASMedia ASM1061 controller to add another two SATA 6Gb/s ports for a grand total of ten SATA 6Gb/s ports. That is some pretty great connecivity.

The eight native SATA ports support RAID 0/1/10, while the remaining two do not support RAID. Definitely use the native ports if you want to minimize boot time.

By the way, for those who are curious, the SATA 6Gb/s performance on this platform looks be excellent, we were able to hit read speeds of up to 557MB/s.


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As we explain in more detail in our M.2 feature test page, the secondary M.2 slot is slower than the primary one since it gets it four PCI-E 2.0 (instead of 3.0) lanes from the X370 chipset. As a result, it has a theoretical maximum bandwidth of 2GB/s, but in real-life you are unlikely to ever see much above 1.6GB/s. Nevertheless, this slot fully supports PCI-E and PCI-E NVMe M.2 solid state drives up to 80mm long, but not SATA-based SSDs.

If this M.2 slot is occupied, the third PCI-E x16 (x4 electrical) slot will be disabled. Likewise, the M.2 slot will be disabled if that PCI-E slot is used.
 
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MAC

Associate Review Editor
Joined
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Messages
1,141
Location
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A Closer Look at the X370 Taichi pt.2

A Closer Look at the X370 Taichi pt.2




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The lower-right corner of the motherboard is where you will find the front panel header, the clear CMOS jumper, the Debug LED display, and the two USB 2.0 headers. The bottom edge of motherboard is where you will find case power LED and speaker header, a four-pin system FAN header, two RGB LED headers, and the front panel audio header.

Those two RGB LED headers is where you can plug in any 12V/3A 36W 5050 RGB LED light strip and have it fully powered by the motherboard and controlled by the RGB LED utility.



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Ryzen processors support sixteen PCI-E 3.0 lanes for graphics purposes. These lanes are divided across two separate PCI-E x16 slots thanks to a handful of NXP L04083B PCI-E 3.0 switches . The third mechanical PCI-E x16 slot operates at PCI-E 2.0 x4 mode, and as mentioned previously it shares bandwidth with the secondary M.2 slot.

In a regular single graphics card setup, the first PCI-E x16 slot will obviously operate at PCI-E 3.0 x16. In a dual graphics card configuration, the first and second slots will operate at PCI-E 3.0 x8, which will still provide ample bandwidth for even the highest-end GPUs. This motherboard supports both 2-Way SLI and CrossFireX.

The two primary PCI-E x16 slots have been mechanically reinforced with a steel cover, as well as additional anchor points.



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Once we removed the plastic shroud, we were able to verify that this motherboard's onboard audio is based on the new Realtek ALC1220 ten-channel HD audio codec. The codec is accompanied by Nichicon Fine Gold Series audio-grade capacitors and a Texas Instruments N5532 op-amp, which serves as headphone amplifier for the front panel headphone jack.

The PCB isolation line surrounds the audio section of the PCB and protects it from the rest of the system. This helps preserve the signal-to-noise (SNR) ratio and thus ensure the highest possible signal quality. Regrettably, there is no electromagnetic interference (EMI) shield covering the Realtek codec, which is a bit of a disappointment at this price point.


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Compared to the competition, the X370 Taichi does not have a ton of ports on its rear I/O panel, but that's mostly because it has four internal USB headers. Starting from left to right, there is the clear CMOS button, a combo keyboard/mouse PS/2 port, two USB 3.0 ports, WiFi/Bluetooth antenna connectors, USB 3.1 Gen2 Type-A and USB 3.1 Gen2 Type-C ports, a gigabit LAN port, four USB 3.0 ports, and five gold-plated analog audio jacks and including a digital S/PDIF output.

The onboard Wi-Fi module supports both dual-band 802.11ac and Bluetooth v4.2. Although it is not mentioned anywhere in the official literature, the Device Manager clearly reveals that it is based on the fairly new Intel Wireless-AC 3168 adapter. This 1x1 solution supports wireless transfer speeds up to 433 Mbps, which is obviously slower than most 2x2 AC-867 solutions. We haven't yet made the leap to the 802.11ac standard, but our 802.11n connection was solid courtesy of the included 1T1R antennas. The antennas feature RP-SMA connectors, and thus can be easily replaced with larger ones.

While this platform has native USB 3.1 functionality, an ASMedia ASM1543 switch is still needed in order to add a USB 3.1 Type-C port. The gigabit LAN port is powered by an Intel i211-AT controller, and it is very well supported across a wide range of operating systems. The PS/2 port is courtesy of a Nuvoton NCT6779D Super I/O controller, which also serves monitoring and fan control duties.

The most notable omission from the rear I/O panel is the total absence of any video outputs, which means that this motherboard won't be able to make full use of the upcoming Zen-based APUs.


Click on image to enlarge

The back of this motherboard has quite a few ICs on it, such as the aforementioned ASMedia ASM1543 USB 3.1 Type-C switch, a number of NXP L04083B PCI-E 3.0 switches, and the eight Infineon IR3598 doublers/dual drivers.

As we have come to expect from a motherboard in this price range, all of the heatsinks and the plastic shroud are attached with metal screws. We also get a better look at the PCB audio separation line that surrounds the audio subsystem.
 

MAC

Associate Review Editor
Joined
Nov 8, 2006
Messages
1,141
Location
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Hardware Installation

Hardware Installation


In the Hardware Installation section we examine how major components fit on the motherboard, and whether there are any serious issues that may affect installation and general functionality. Specifically, we are interested in determining whether there is adequate clearance in all critical areas.


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While we have never really encountered any clearance issues when installing an all-in-one liquid cooler - like this Corsair Hydro H110i - you will want to be careful on what side you place the hoses since they can get pretty darn close to the memory modules. By the way, the mounting hardware for the Hydro basically just clips and screws onto the stock plastic brackets that come pre-mounted to all AM4 motherboards.


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As mentioned in the previous section, this motherboard has a wide open CPU socket area and low profile MOSFET heatsinks, so installing any type of cooling on this motherboard should be a breeze. No matter what mounting hardware your cooler comes with this motherboard can handle it without any clearance issues. This also seems like the best motherboard for LN2 pots, since it would be so easy to do a fantastic insulating job.



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When we occupied the memory slot nearest to the CPU socket, even when using standard height memory modules our Prolimatech Mega Shadow's fan clips still made the tiniest bit of contact with the heat spreaders. Thankfully, it didn't actually prevent installation of either the memory or the clips. When we swapped in very tall G.Skill Trident Z memory modules, there were clearance issues even in the farthest memory slots, and it did prevent the installation of the fan clip on one side. The solution is obviously to find another way hold the fan in place, or to mount it on the other side of the heatsink, both of which are less than ideal.


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Due to the expansion slot layout, the gap between the DDR4 memory slots and the back of the graphics card is a bit smaller than we would like, but since the memory slots are clipless on that side there is no need to take out the GPU before installing/uninstalling memory modules. The 24-pin ATX power connector and the 8-pin CPU power connector are both ideally placed, so that makes assembling and disassembling the system just a tad easier.




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This motherboard will easily hold one or two dual-slot graphics cards without difficulty. The cards will obviously extend past the motherboard length-wise, but that second card will thankfully not overhang any of the headers at the bottom edge of the motherboard. The gap between the first and second graphics card is wide enough that slim non-metallic object can easily be used to reach the second card's PCI-E slot release clip.


The ten 90-degree SATA ports are obviously accessible no matter how many and what type of graphics cards are installed.


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Installing an M.2 SSD in the top M.2 slot is a trouble-free affair. You shouldn’t need to remove your CPU heatsink, but you will have to remove any graphics card installed in the primary PCI-E x16 slot since the space between the heatsink and the back of the graphics card will likely be rather minimal.


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Installing an M.2 SSD on the middle or bottom M.2 slot is also simple. Obviously, any dual-slot expansion card installed in the secondary PCI-E x16 slot will make the M.2 slot inaccessible, so that graphics card will need to be removed before installing/uninstalling any solid state drive.


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There's nothing too complicated when it comes to screwing the two antennas onto the Wi-Fi connectors, either one can be plugged into either connector.
 
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MAC

Associate Review Editor
Joined
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Location
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UEFI Explored

UEFI Explored



AMD didn't give motherboard manufacturers much time to get their BIOSes in good shape before the Ryzen launch date. In fact, we have never seen a processor launch where BIOSes were this rough industry-wide. Not only was there a lack of polish, but a lot of options were missing becauce AMD did not unlock very many settings in their pre-launch uCore versions. Thankfully, the situation has improved substantially since March 2nd. We actually waited for the BIOS situation to improve instead of rushing out this review earlier. As you can see above, we are currently using the 1.55 Beta and so far every thing works great.





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The OC Tweaker section is where all the fun happens. Once you enable the Overclock Mode, you can adjust the BCLK frequency, select a CPU frequency, enable or disable simultaneous multithreading (SMT), load your memory kit's XMP profile, select a memory frequency, adjust the memory timings, and tweak all the various system voltages, two of which have load-line calibration (LLC) options.




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The Advanced tab is where you can tweak countless esoteric motherboard settings and enable or disable all the onboard components like audio, Wi-Fi, SATA ports, etc. You can also tweak CPU-specific settings like Cool 'n' Quiet, virtualization, and C6 state. The really cool settings are found in those last two categories: AMD CBS and AMD PBS.






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In the AMD CBS section, you will find a ton of CPU options to fool around with, but you probably shouldn't. The only one that is worth taking a look at the Custom Core P-States menu, which as indicated allows you to set your own per-core P-state (CPU frequency, multiplier, voltage). This is a very high level feature that most motherboard manufacturers are not including, since it requires the user to understand confusing elements like FID, DID, and VID.
 
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MAC

Associate Review Editor
Joined
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Location
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UEFI Explored pt.2

UEFI Explored pt.2





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The Tool tab is where you can find a bunch of the handy tools that ASRock have developed to make setting up the motherboard a little more user friendly. The RGB LED sub-menu is where you can simply enable or disable the onboard LEDs that are under the chipset heatsink. The Easy RAID and Easy Driver Installers simplify the job of installing drivers via the included DVD. The Instant Flash tool allows you to update the UEFI from a storage device, while the Internet Flash is a unique feature that permits users to update the UEFI directly from the internet. Both are quick, painless, and take the worry out of BIOS flashing.



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The H/W Monitor tab is mostly dedicated to monitoring the various voltages, temperatures, and fan speeds. This whole section is really quite impressive, it has all the essential temperature and voltage readouts, as well as truly excellent and comprehensive fan control functionality.


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The Security tab is where you can set the Supervisor Password, as well as a subordinate User Password. By doing so, you can enable the Secure Boot option.



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The Boot tab is essentially where you set storage device priority, select the boot drive, enable/disable Fast Boot or the full screen logo, and ton of other boot settings that can help with the installation or troubleshooting of various OS installations.


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You can either hit F10 key or enter the Exit tab in order to save your settings and exit the UEFI. We wish ASRock implemented a pop-up window that lists the changes you made during the session. If and when you want to reset all the settings, the Load UEFI Defaults will obviously come in handy.
 

MAC

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Joined
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Location
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Included Software

Included Software



ASRock APP Shop


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The ASRock APP Shop is an all-in-one centralized hub for all the BIOS, drivers, and utilities that ASRock bundles/requires with their motherboards. It permanently resides in the notification area/icon tray in the right corner of your screen. Not only does it give you one location from which to open or even uninstall all motherboard-related pieces of software, but it also feature a Live Update feature that lets you know if the there's a new version of the software available.


ASRock RGB LED


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The ASRock RGB LED software utility allows users to control the RGB LEDs that are integrated into the chipset cooler, and any lighting strip that is plugged into the RGB header. The LEDs can be adjusted to any number of different colours and customized to create cool lighting effects, like pulsating with the beat of your music, ‘breathing’, strobing, cycling through all the colours, statically displaying one colour, or just totally disabled if that is your preference. Definitely check out our ASRock RGB LED feature test page to see what the lighting effects look like.


ASRock XFast LAN


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The XFast LAN utility is designed to help reduce latency courtesy of cFosSpeed traffic-shapping technology. It provides users with a lot of control and monitoring capabilities over every application that is accessing the network. It displays CPU usage, NPU usage, ICMP and UDP average ping, and the network utilization of every system process and program. This tool also allows you give priority to certain applications, and throttle or block others to free network resources for other applications. It is your one-stop tool for monitoring and controlling all network traffic, and it even comes with a little widget for real-time bandwidth information.


Restart to UEFI


The Restart to UEFI utility allows users to boot directly into the BIOS without having to repeatedly hit delete during the POST screen. It is a pretty hand tool when you are rebooting as often as overclockers tend to do.


AMD Ryzen Master


The AMD Ryzen Master utility is an incredibly useful tool when it comes to overclocking these new processors. First and foremost - in our opinion - is the fact that this utility is currently the best way of accurately monitoring the CPU temperature, as well as the real-time CPU voltage. There's many monitoring apps out there, but very few are properly tuned for Ryzen processors at this time.

The other key element is that Ryzen Master gives you is obviously full overclocking control over Ryzen processors, all of which are multiplier unlocked. With this tool, not only can you manually set individual core clocks, but you can also disable cores, overclock your DDR4 memory, adjust memory timings, and even increase/decrease system voltages.

If you can to create different overclocking profiles for different workloads you can do that as well, with the ability to save up to four performance profiles.
 

MAC

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Joined
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Messages
1,141
Location
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Test Setups & Methodology

Test Setups & Methodology



For this review, we are going to be testing the performance of the ASRock X370 Taichi four configurations: default settings @ DDR4-2133, default setting @ DDR4-2666, default setting @ DDR4-3200, and manual overclock settings. The components and software are the same across all five configurations, and aside from manually selecting the frequencies, timings, and voltages in the manual overclock configuration, every option in the BIOS was at its default setting.

AMD Ryzen AM4 Test Setup​

For all of the benchmarks, appropriate lengths are taken to ensure an equal comparison through methodical setup, installation, and testing. The following outlines our testing methodology:

A) Windows is installed using a full format.

B) Chipset drivers and accessory hardware drivers (audio, network, GPU) are installed.

C)To ensure consistent results, a few tweaks are applied to Windows 10 Pro and the NVIDIA control panel:
  • UAC – Disabled
  • Indexing – Disabled
  • Superfetch – Disabled
  • System Protection/Restore – Disabled
  • Problem & Error Reporting – Disabled
  • Remote Desktop/Assistance - Disabled
  • Windows Security Center Alerts – Disabled
  • Windows Defender – Disabled
  • Screensaver – Disabled
  • Power Plan – High Performance
  • V-Sync – Off

D) All available Windows updates are then installed.

E) All programs are installed and then updated, followed by a defragment.

F) Benchmarks are each run three to ten times, and unless otherwise stated the results are then averaged.


Here is a full list of the applications that we utilized in our benchmarking suite:
  • 3DMark Vantage Professional Edition v1.1.3
  • 3DMark11 Professional Edition v1.0.132.0
  • 3DMark 2013 Professional Edition v2.2.3491
  • AIDA64 Engineer Edition v5.80.4098 Beta
  • Cinebench R15 64-bit
  • FAHBench 1.2.0
  • Final Fantasy XIV: Heavensward Benchmark
  • Grand Theft Auto V
  • HEVC Decode Benchmark (Cobra) v1.61
  • LuxMark v3.1
  • Middle-earth: Shadow of Mordor
  • PCMark 8
  • SuperPi Mod v1.9 WP
  • Valve Particle Simulation Benchmark v1.0.0.0
  • WinRAR x64 5.40
  • wPRIME version v2.10
  • X3: Terran Conflict Demo v1.0
That is about all you need to know methodology wise, so let's get to the good stuff!
 
Last edited:

MAC

Associate Review Editor
Joined
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Messages
1,141
Location
Montreal
Feature Testing: ASRock RGB LED

Feature Testing: ASRock RGB LED




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If you're not a fan of RGB LED lighting, the X370 Taichi might just be the motherboard for you. The ASRock RGB LED feature on this motherboard is essentially limited to four LEDs placed under the chipset cooler. However, if you want to expand that there are two RGB headers on which you can plug 5050 RGB LED strips up 12V/3A (36W). ASRock have also added another RGB header near the CPU fan headers, since the AMD Wraith Spire and Wraith Max coolers both feature RGB lighting and it can be controlled from within the ASRock RGB LED utility. Although those two coolers are impossible to buy, we are sure that other manufacturers will be offering RGB-enabled cooling solutions.

These RGB LEDs can be controlled using the aforementioned utility or even a special section in the UEFI BIOS. The lights can be adjusted to a number of different colours and customized to create cool lighting effects. The presets can cause the LEDs to change shades breathe, strobe, cycle through all the colours, fade in and out, flash on and off, just statically display one colour, and more. You can also adjust the speed at which these LEDs turn on and off.



Click on image to enlarge

With only four onboard LEDs you obviously aren't going to be witnessing any magical light shows on this motherboard. However, the LEDs are bright and colourful, and they certainly add a little razzle-dazzle to a system. Those wanting more definitely have that opportunity thanks to the three onboard headers, which is two more than we have seen on any other motherboard.

Here is a little live action look at RGB LED feature on the ASRock X370 Taichi:

<iframe width="700" height="394" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/YGkKY4dQcsI?rel=0" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>​
 

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