What's new
  • Please do not post any links until you have 3 posts as they will automatically be rejected to prevent SPAM. Many words are also blocked due to being used in SPAM Messages. Thanks!

ASUS P8Z68-V PRO Z68 Sandy Bridge Motherboard Review

Status
Not open for further replies.

Eldonko

Well-known member
Joined
Apr 5, 2007
Messages
5,416
Location
Calgary, AB
Be sure to also read our full Z68 chipset review where SSD Caching and Lucid's Virtu are both tested.


You’ve been waiting for it and we’ve got it: the first look at Intel’s new Z68 chipset. This is the next evolutionary step for the Sandy Bridge platform and is being used as a testing ground for several new technologies.

Some may wonder why we’re already seeing a PCH with only a few additional features that will augment the P67 but this precedent was already set years ago. However, unlike the “refreshed” P35/P45 and X38/X48 chipsets from the early days of the Core 2 family, both the Z68 and its sibling will live side by side for the time being. Due in part to its similarity with the new PCH, some manufacturers may choose to discontinue motherboards based around P67 while others (like ASUS) will continue offering both yet at slightly different price points.

Z68-63.jpg

Unlike some of their competitors, ASUS will be running a tight ship in the Z68 market. Initially three boards –the standard, Pro and Deluxe- will be offered at three distinct price points but this lineup will likely expand slightly as demand grows. As you can see above, we expect to see RoG-branded Z68 motherboards as well. For the time being though, we have the mid-tier $209 P8Z68-V Pro on our test bench.

With features like Intel’s Smart Response Technology for SSD caching, onboard HDMI 1.4 compatibility and Lucid’s Virtu switchable graphics solution, ASUS’ Z68 Pro seems to have an edge over their P67 offerings. But in this case the differences are merely skin deep since features like a UEFI BIOS, USB 3.0, SATA6G and SLI / Crossfire compatibility are carried over piecemeal from the $179 P8P67 Pro.

The recall of the P67 motherboards pushed broad availability of those products back; so much so that many users put off purchasing P67 in order to see what Z68 products had in store. Well, this eagerly anticipated is now here but should its limited number of differentiating factors really make this new PCH more expensive than its sibling? Let’s find out.

Title1.jpg
 
Last edited by a moderator:

Eldonko

Well-known member
Joined
Apr 5, 2007
Messages
5,416
Location
Calgary, AB
Specifications & Features

Specifications:

Before jumping right into photos and testing, let’s take a look at the specifications for the P8Z68-V Pro.

Specs1.png

Specs2.png

Specs3.png

Specs4.png



ASUS P8Z68-V Pro Features

A few notable features on the ASUS P8Z68-V Pro include: Lucid Virtu, the UEFI BIOS, ASUS AI Suite II, 12 + 4 phase DIGI+ VRM, USB 3.0, SATA 6.0, and Quad-GPU SLI and Quad-GPU CrossFireX support. A brief summary of each of these features and other board features is as follows:

Features1.png

Features2.png

Features3.png

Features4.png
 
Last edited by a moderator:

Eldonko

Well-known member
Joined
Apr 5, 2007
Messages
5,416
Location
Calgary, AB
Say Hello to Z68; Built for the Mainstream Enthusiast

Say Hello to Z68; Built for the Mainstream Enthusiast


Back when Lynnfield was launched, we were introduced to an all new chipset layout from Intel where many of the usual Northbridge functions were consolidated onto the CPU die. This P55 Express “Ibex Peak” chipset allowed for a more integrated layout and also moved away from the traditional two-chip layout of a Northbridge and Southbridge towards a single chipset design. Sandy Bridge on the other hand took things to the next level by introducing the Cougar Point family of 6-series chipsets. While there were surely some initial teething problems that culminated in a widespread product recall, things seem to be (hopefully) back on track.

When they were released the P67-based boards initially targeted the slightly higher end market and Intel’s motherboard partners were more than happy to flex their muscles by coming to market with feature rich boards. Other chipsets like the H67 was destined for slightly lower-end product ranges. However, we now have a new wrinkle in the motherboard fabric: Z68.

Z68-56.jpg

The high-end Z68 Express chipset layout is nearly identical to the P67 Express but if you look closer, there are some changes. Like on the P67 the 16 PCI-E 2.0 lanes from the processor they can be used in one of two ways: either one slot operating at x16 or dual slots running at x8. This means both Crossfire and SLI are supported though not at their full theoretical bandwidth. In addition, the Processor Graphics can be potentially enabled and interfaces with the chipset’s display and audio outputs through an FDI (Flexible Display Interface).

The Cougar Point chipset (in this case Z68 Express) acts as the control hub for all of the peripheral, display and storage connectors on supporting motherboards. As with P67 it features eight PCI-E lanes and an Intel HD Audio module along with Intel’s Extreme Tuning support. Intel Extreme Tuning wasn’t available on past IGP-enabled chipsets and adds Windows-based overclocking if you have an unlocked K-series processor as well as some basic system monitoring tools.

Where things really change in comparison with the P67 chipset is the availability of rear-panel display outputs for the processor graphics hub. Unfortunately, not all Z68 boards will come with the necessary connectors and without these, the integrated GPU will remain disabled; effectively eliminating the GPU switching and Quick Sync abilities. The aforementioned Intel Smart Response Technology is another addition which the P67 boards won’t benefit from but otherwise, the external storage capabilities of Z68 mirror those of its sibling.

Z68-50.jpg

Many of you may remember this handy little diagram which illustrated the main differences between the H67 and P67 chipset’s abilities and features. The P67 allowed for the overclocking of unlocked K-series Sandy Bridge CPUs but didn’t come equipped with an active display output so the onboard processor graphics controller (PGC) stayed dormant. Meanwhile H67 offered next to no processor overclocking –even with K-series chips- but unlocked the onboard graphics controller so features like Quick Sync video transcoding and high efficiency HD video playback were accessible. In short, a customer was forced to make a choice between the PGC’s capabilities and the ability to squeeze more performance out of their CPU through overclocking.

Z68 changes this –and will likely have some P67 buyers frustrated beyond belief- by incorporating the P67’s overclocking prowess alongside the potential for an active processor graphics hub. To many enthusiasts the image of an integrated GPU’s limited gaming performance many not seem all that exciting upon first glance but in this case, Intel has sweetened the pot.

Z68-53.jpg

By far, the most interesting addition to the Z68 PCH is Intel’s new Smart Response Technology that has been incorporated into Intel’s Matrix Storage driver stack. RST Caching as it’s called increases system load times by caching frequently used files on a secondary solid state drive.

Quick Sync transcoding may be one of the predominant features brought about by the IGP being activated but Lucid’s Virtu engine and NVIDIA’s upcoming desktop Optimus technology also allow for seamless switching between the CPU’s graphics processor and a dedicated graphics card. This may not sound particularly interesting for most users but it can potentially allow for a more efficient system while allowing for more operations to be done in parallel without impacting gaming performance.
 
Last edited by a moderator:

SKYMTL

HardwareCanuck Review Editor
Staff member
Joined
Feb 26, 2007
Messages
12,841
Location
Montreal
Intel's Smart Response Technology Under the Microscope

An In-Depth Look at Intel's Smart Response Technology


You can find our full tests and impressions of Intel's SRT in the review HERE

Modern solid state drives may have boatloads of speed but all too often they fall flat in one key area: storage capacity. In the almighty price per GB race, the ages old spindle-based drives have a significant edge which is becoming more and more important as digital files erupt in size. With high definition content consumption on the rise and the installation size of many games easily reaching the 15GB mark, a sub-$400 SSD just isn’t in the cards unless sacrifices are made.

In order to marry the speed of an SSD with the capacity of modern hard drives, some have been looking towards file caching as an interim solution. Essentially, this means storing certain files of frequently used programs on the blazingly fast SSD in order to speed up boot and load times while the HDD is used as a mass storage device. It’s a novel idea which has been used quite effectively in the past. We’ve seen Kingston introduce their value-oriented Desktop Upgrade series and Seagate use a similar approach for their Momentus XT hard drives. Even Silverstone has weighed in on the game with the excellent, easy to use and inexpensive HDDBoost. Now it’s Intel’s turn.

Z68-57.jpg

Intel’s approach centers upon their Rapid Storage Technology into which has been built a provision that allows SSD acceleration (Smart Response Technology) to operate. In real time SRT caches the most frequently used blocks of data (it does not cache entire files) while intelligently discarding blocks from applications that are not as frequently used. In layman’s terms this means the technology adapts to usage patterns and doesn’t use unnecessary space by speeding up seldomly used programs. It does take some time to “learn” which files are most used but by the second Windows boot or program load, there should be a noticeable improvement in responsiveness.

Smart Response Technology is also vendor agnostic but a 20GB or higher capacity SSD should be used to ensure adequate space for the cached files. A larger SSD naturally leads to further improved caching since it can store the necessary boot files for more applications.

Z68-58.jpg

Since Smart Response Technology is housed within Intel’s RST control panel, it is relatively easy to access and implement once Windows is installed.

Contrary to their claims, Smart Response Technology is not quite as “plug and play” as Intel says. RST Caching requires Windows to be installed in RAID mode but most people who use a single HDD will likely have their BIOS set to IDE or AHCI mode by default. Naturally this shouldn’t cause any issues for people who had the foresight to install their Windows operating systems with RAID enabled in their motherboard’s BIOS. However, for everyone else, using Intel’s caching will require a complete reinstallation of Windows or modifying some registry files and installing the necessary RAID driver prior to the installation of the caching SSD. If you don’t, be prepared for endless BSODs after rebooting with RAID mode enabled.

Z68-59.jpg

Within RST, there are two options: Enhanced and Maximum. Enhanced allows for host writes from both the HDD and SSD but write performance is limited to the performance of the hard drive rather than the SSD. Maximum mode provides additional performance since reads and writes are done on the SSD. The only downfall with Maximum mode is that data can be lost if there is a critical system failure. Below is a chart detailing what each state entails in terms of risk.

Z68-51.jpg
 
Last edited:

SKYMTL

HardwareCanuck Review Editor
Staff member
Joined
Feb 26, 2007
Messages
12,841
Location
Montreal
Lucid’s Virtu GPU Switching

Lucid’s Virtu GPU Switching


You can find our full tests and impressions of Virtu in the review HERE

When it was first announced, NVIDIA’s Optimus GPU switching technology was greeted with open arms due to its ability to seamlessly switch between a high performance discrete GPU and the efficient IGP on notebooks. While NVIDIA is busy working on its own switching technology for the desktop market, Lucid has taken a step ahead by introducing Virtu. This is a truly vendor agnostic approach which supports both NVIDIA and AMD cards.

Z68-55.jpg

Virtu is very much like Optimus: it utilizes Sandy Bridge’s onboard graphics processor for higher idle efficiency along with media acceleration while leveraging the high performance discrete GPU for gaming and professional workloads. This combination ensures resources are properly designated towards the subsystem that is best suited to handle a given task.

Z68-54.jpg

In order to achieve what (in theory) should be a seamless transition between the integrated graphics processor and the discrete GPU, Lucid implements a proprietary software that directs workloads. Basically, there are two options here: the iGPU mode where the main display is plugged into the integrated graphics controller and the dGPU mode

If the software detects a 3D application when in iGPU mode, it will bypass IGP, allow the AMD or NVIDIA card to render and then output the image through the processor’s video memory and then towards the motherboard’s onboard display connector. This has the potential to cause a performance penalty but as the software matures, any overhead should be gradually reduced. Meanwhile, for 2D loads and media playback / conversion, the information is sent directly through the IGP.

Alternately, if the monitor is plugged into the discrete graphics card through dGPU mode, the benefits of lower idle power consumption will be nullified. This is because the less efficient graphics card will be in charge of 2D and Windows Aero rendering rather than Sandy Bridge’s smaller on-die engine.

Here is Lucid's rundown of the two modes:

  • i-Mode provides users with near zero performance overhead on 3D graphics games, while enjoying Intel Sandy Bridge media features and power saving options when no 3D gaming is used. As this mode allows the added-on VGA cards to stay under idle for most of the system up time, the power consumption is also relatively lower.

  • d-Mode is provided for demanding 3D gamers to achieve 3D performance of discrete GPU installed in the system. In this mode, Virtu allows user to utilize Intel special features such as transcoding, while display is connected to discrete GPU.

Z68-61.jpg

Lucid’s main control panel is actually quite sparse since all of the action is taking place behind the scenes, hopefully out of the end user’s view. This view basically shows whether Virtu is working, which onboard processor is presently handling the workload and the placement of the Virtu logo within applications (along with an option to turn off the logo of course). There is also a performance optimization slider in order to fine tune the image quality in relation to framerates.

Z68-62.jpg

The Games tab indicates which games or applications are currently compatible with the virtualization software when in iGPU mode. There are several hundred titles supported and the list has rapidly grown since Virtu’s inception. Unfortunately it does tend to take a while until a newly released game is added to the list so it’s important to check for updates often.

In dGPU mode, any games supported by the current graphics card driver will work without an issue since virtualization is used for the integrated graphics controller’s functions.
 
Last edited:

Eldonko

Well-known member
Joined
Apr 5, 2007
Messages
5,416
Location
Calgary, AB
Packaging and Accessories

Packaging and Accessories

Sboxfront.jpg
Sboxback.jpg

No, your eyes aren’t deceiving you; the P8Z68-V Pro’s box is almost identical in design to the P67 version; the P8P67 Pro. ASUS stuck with the black and yellow lettering theme and even the descriptions look nearly identical.

Sboxfront1.jpg
Sboxfront2.jpg

Taking a close look at the front of the box we see the DIGI+ VRM are featured exactly like the P8P67 Pro but one major difference is the GPU Boost logo on the bottom left corner.

Sboxback1.jpg
Sboxback2.jpg

The back of the box reads like a manual and is very text heavy. ASUS explains the TPU, EPU, BT GO!, UEFI, and Digital Power Design features in detail.

Sboxopen1.jpg
Sacc1.jpg

Inside the box the board lives in an anti-static bag and sits on top of a cardboard divider which is pretty standard fare. Below the divider the accessories are found.

Sacc2.jpg
Sacc3.jpg

The P8Z68-V Pro doesn’t have a ton of accessories, just the basics. Consistent with several other boards it comes with an SLI bridge but no CrossFireX bridge despite supporting both. Of the few accessories, of interest is the USB 3.0 bracket which can give a user two extra USB 3.0 ports, doubling the total from two to four.
 
Last edited by a moderator:

Eldonko

Well-known member
Joined
Apr 5, 2007
Messages
5,416
Location
Calgary, AB
Included Software

Included Software

The software that comes with the P8Z68-V Pro consists mainly of ASUS AI Suite II and a few smaller items. AI Suite II is an all-in-one interface that integrates several ASUS utilities and allows users to launch and operate these utilities simultaneously.

Ssoft1.png
Ssoft2.png

TurboV allows you to overclock the BCLK frequency, CPU voltage, IMC voltage, and DRAM Bus voltage in Windows and takes effect in real-time without exiting and rebooting the OS. More voltages such as VCCIO, PLL, PCH, etc. are available by clicking the advanced mode.

ASUS TurboV EVO includes two auto tuning modes: Fast Tuning and Extreme Tuning. TurboV automatically overclocks the CPU and memory and restarts the system. After re-entering Windows, a message appears indicating the current overclocking result. To keep the result, click Stop or to push a little further don’t click stop and the system then continues to stability tests.

Ssoft3.png
Ssoft4.png

ASUS DIGI+ VRM allows users to adjust VRM voltage and frequency modulation to enhance reliability and stability. It also provides power efficiency, generating less heat to provide longer component lifespan and minimize power loss.

With the DIGI+ VRM panel, users can adjust many crucial settings for stability and power saving including: DIGI+ VRM Load-line Calibration, DIGI+ VRM CPU Current Capability, DIGI+ VRM Frequency, DIGI+ VRM Phase Control, DIGI+ VRM Duty Control, iGPU Load-line Calibration, and iGPU Current Capability.

EPU is an energy-efficient tool that satisfies different computing needs. This utility provides several modes that you can select to save system power. Selecting Auto mode will have the system shift modes automatically according to current system status. You can also customize each mode by configuring settings like CPU frequency, GPU frequency, vCore Voltage, and Fan Control.

Ssoft5.png
Ssoft6.png

Asus Fan Xpert allows adjustments to both the CPU and chassis fan speeds according to different ambient temperatures and your PC’s system loading. The various fan profiles offer flexible controls of fan speeds to achieve a quiet and cool system environment.

ASUS Probe II is a utility that monitors the computer’s vital components, and detects and alerts you of any problem with these components. Probe II senses fan rotations, CPU temperature, and system voltages. By clicking the Voltage/Temperature/Fan Speed tabs you can activate the sensors or adjust the sensor threshold values and the Preference tab allows for customized sensor alerts, or changes to the temperature scale.

Ssoft7.png
Ssoft8.png

The temperature recorder allows you to record temperatures, voltages, and fan speeds over specified time periods for precision monitoring.

Meanwhile, AI Charger + is designed to make USB charging faster than the standard USB devices. If your USB device supports the BC 1.1 function, the system will automatically detect your USB device and will start a fast USB charging sequence.

Ssoft9.png
Ssoft10.png

The ASUS Update is a utility that allows you to manage, save, and update the motherboard BIOS in Windows environment. The ASUS Update utility allows you to update the BIOS directly from the Internet, download the latest BIOS file from the Internet, update the BIOS from an updated BIOS file, save the current BIOS file, and view the BIOS version information.

The last part of AI Suite II is the System Information tab. This is similar to a program such as CPU-Z where Motherboard, CPU, and memory information is shown.

As you can see, AI Suite II really is an extensive software suite that has about everything you could ever need in one handy program. The days of installing 10 utilities from a software disk are over.
 
Last edited by a moderator:

Eldonko

Well-known member
Joined
Apr 5, 2007
Messages
5,416
Location
Calgary, AB
A Closer Look at the P8Z68-V Pro

A Closer Look at the P8Z68-V Pro

layout.png

At first glance, the P8Z68-V Pro really does look like the P67 Pro’s doppelganger. It uses the same expansion slot layout and a very, very similar heatsink design but there are numerous changes. The Power and Reset buttons are now larger, backlit and placed at the bottom of the board, the switches for TPU and EPU are next to the memory slots and the list goes on.

Instead of recycling their P67 boards, it looks like ASUS built upon a similar platform and worked in a few revisions and slight upgrades.

Io.png

The I/O panel contains an optical S/PDIF out port, a Bluetooth module, an eSATA port, an Intel LAN (RJ-45) port, two USB 3.0/2.0 ports, six USB 2.0/1.1 ports, HDMI and DVI ports, a VGA port, and 8-channel audio I/O ports.

All in all, this is a very comprehensive layout but it is important to note that the DVI output is single link only. Thus, any monitors with a resolution higher than 1920 x 1200 / 60Hz will not be supported.

Sboard2.jpg
Sboard1.jpg

Directly behind the I/O panel are two Asmedia chips marked ASM1442. These ICs are for the HDMI and DVI ports and convert input from PCI Express and the chipset to HDMI compliant differential output. Also next to the I/O panel is the 12v power connector.

Additionally, the above right image shows that one heatsink is attached via screws and the other is attached via plastic push pins which tend to cause a fair bit of sway.

Sboard5.jpg
Sboard6.jpg

Next up we have the heatsinks around the VRM area and the CPU socket. The heatsinks are passively cooled and are consistent with what we have seen on several other ASUS boards. The CPU socket is LOTES branded and is surrounded by the 16-phase PWM.

Sboard27.jpg
Sboard28.jpg

As you can see from the back of the board, the heatsink that is attached by screws has a backplate and the one that is attached by plastic push pins does not. The Z68 heatsink is attached by screws as well, but uses a different type of screw that has a spring in order to prevent tightening it too much and crushing the chipset.

Sboard7.jpg
Sboard8.jpg

Beneath the heatsinks we have the DIGI+ VRM EPU along with 16 chokes, drivers and MOSFETS (one for each phase). DIGI+ VRM acts as a digital controller eliminating digital-to-analog conversion lag. Compared to analog designs, a DIGI+ VRM offers more flexibility and faster system response times so adjustments to voltages can be more accurate and safer to implement. Twelve of the phases are DIGI+ VRM phases (vcore) plus four for vDRAM/QPI.

Sboard9.jpg
Sboard10.jpg

The DIGI+ VRM EPU chip is labeled ASP1000C-162 and is made by CHiL Semiconductor Corp. The DIGI+ fully integrates Intel’s VRD12 specifications and features a digital programmable microprocessor, matching Intel’s VRD12 digital power signal (SVID). The digital PWM design also allows for fast transient response for Intel’s Turbo Boost technology (ramping up and down of CPU multiplier) and the DIGI+ VRM’s power design balances power phase loadings by detecting per phase (choke + driver + MOSFET = 1 phase) VRM temperatures.

The DIGI+ VRM works alongside the Dual Intelligent Processors design. The first of the two co-processors is the EPU (Energy Processing Unit). The EPU allows users to decrease the power consumption of the system whenever possible by actively monitoring loads, voltages, temperatures, etc. of all key components including CPU, VGA, Chipsets, DRAM, Fan, and HDD. EPU can accurately detect the CPU load in real-time and intelligently manage the balance between performance and power consumption. EPU also manages voltage supplied to key components according to the respective load on the components and allows the user to adjust vCore, chipset voltage, and so on.

The second co-processor is the TPU (TurboV Processing Unit) hardware controller. The TPU offers real-time adjustments and hardware monitoring of system frequencies such as multipliers, BCLK, and corresponding voltages such as vCore, DRAM, and VRM specific voltages. The TPU also enables the OC Tuner feature which is an auto overclocking algorithm.
 
Last edited by a moderator:

Eldonko

Well-known member
Joined
Apr 5, 2007
Messages
5,416
Location
Calgary, AB
A Closer Look at the P8Z68-V Pro p.2

A Closer Look at the P8Z68-V Pro

Sboard11.jpg
Sboard12.jpg

Moving down to the bottom right corner we come to the DDR3 memory slots, several fan headers, the MemOK! button, TPU and EPU switches, and a buck controller. ASUS recommends using the blue memory slots before occupying the grey slots.

Sboard13.jpg
Sboard14.jpg

The uP6023 chip seen next to the MemOK! button is a compact dual-phase synchronous-rectified Buck controller. Enabling the EPU switch will automatically detect the current PC loadings and intelligently moderate the power consumption. The TPU switch enables voltage control and advanced monitoring through the Auto Tuning and TurboV functions.

The MemOK! button quickly ensures memory boot compatibility. This memory rescue tool determines failsafe settings and improves your system’s boot success.

Continuing left along the bottom of the board we pass the 24 pin power connector and come to a USB 3.0 header for the front panel connector and a fan header. The ASMedia ASM1042 chip nearby is the USB 3.0 extended host controller for the USB 3.0 header.

Sboard15.jpg
Sboard16.jpg

Next up we have the brand new Z68 PCH which is passively cooled by a heatsink since it really doesn’t produce much heat.

Sboard17.jpg
Sboard18.jpg

Below the chipset heatsink are the SATA ports. The two dark blue ports on the left are SATA 6.0 running off the Marvell 9172 controller and the two white ports are SATA 6.0 running directly off the PCH. The remaining four ports on the left in light blue are SATA 3.0 ports and also run directly to the PCH. Similar to P67, the Z68 chipset can run two SATA 6.0 ports natively so any additional ports need to be powered via an add-on controller.

At the bottom left corner of the board we have the front panel connectors, TPU chip, and the clear CMOS jumper.

Sboard19.jpg
Sboard20.jpg

Moving up the left side of the board, there are two IEEE 1394 ports (firewire) and three SATA 2.0 ports.

Behind the SATA and 1394 connectors are two large chips labeled Nuvoton NCT6776F and VIA VT6308P. The Nuvoton NCT6776F monitors several parameters, including power supply voltages, fan speeds and temperatures. This chip also supports the Smart Fan control system. The VIA VT6308P is the controller chip for the IEEE 1394 high-speed serial bus.
 
Last edited by a moderator:

Eldonko

Well-known member
Joined
Apr 5, 2007
Messages
5,416
Location
Calgary, AB
A Closer Look at the P8Z68-V Pro p.3

A Closer Look at the P8Z68-V Pro

Sboard21.jpg
Sboard22.jpg

Directly above the VIA IEEE chip is another ASMedia chip marked ASM1083. The ASM1083 is a x1 PCI Express to 32-bit PCI Bridge, and enables the legacy parallel bus devices to connect to the advanced serial PCI Express interface.

Nearby on the edge of the board is the power and reset switches which are well placed for those that use a tech station setup.

Sboard23.jpg
Sboard24.jpg

At the top corner of the board is the Realtek ALC892 audio chip. The ALC892 is a multi-channel High Definition Audio Codec with lossless content protection technology. The ALC892 also provides ten DAC channels that simultaneously support 7.1 channel sound playback, plus 2 channels of independent stereo sound output (multiple streaming) through the front panel stereo outputs.

As can be seen, the PCI-E and PCI slot spacing is quite good with full compatibility for graphics cards sporting oversized heatsinks. In total there are two PCI-E x1 slots, three PCI-E x16 slots and two PCI slots.

Sboard25.jpg
Sboard26.jpg

On the top of the board, right next to the I/O panel are two more chips to take a look at: the Intel WG82579V and yet another ASMedia ASM1042. The very popular Intel WG82579V is an integrated Gigabit LAN controller which is among the fastest and most reliable on the market.
 
Last edited by a moderator:
Status
Not open for further replies.

Latest posts

Twitter

Top