What's new
  • Please do not post any links until you have 3 posts as they will automatically be rejected to prevent SPAM. Many words are also blocked due to being used in SPAM Messages. Thanks!

CoGage True Spirit CPU Cooler Review

Status
Not open for further replies.

AkG

Well-known member
Joined
Oct 24, 2007
Messages
5,270
cogage.jpg


Cogage TRUE Spirit Rev.2 Cooler Review




Manufacture Page: COGAGE::COMPUTER AND GAMING GEAR
Part Number: True Spirit
Price: under $39 USD
Tekwiki: Cogage True Spirit CPU Cooler - Specs & Reviews



Not all that long ago we looked at the first revision of the Cogage True Spirit and while we found it to be a decent unit -one that was almost as good as the venerable Thermalright TRUE- it never did live up to our expectations. As me made clear in that review, the fact the TRUE Spirit relied on a less than optimal mounting solution was the major reason for it not reaching its (pardon the pun) "TRUE" potential. It is for this reason we are so excited about today’s review, as we are looking at the new and revised Cogage TRUE Spirit.

Believe it or not, the mounting system really is the only thing that was really changed from the previous generation’s design. This should suit everyone just fine considering the “older” version had all the hallmarks of a great value-oriented heatsink that could properly cool anything from an overclocked i7 to lower-end processors as well. As we said, the only issue was its decidedly lackluster push-pin mounting setup that didn’t apply adequate pressure and lacked a backplatefor additional stability as well. To see this fixed is definitely a huge step forward but we still have one concern: there are very few ways for a consumer to tell the new TRUE Spirit from the old one if they are buying online. The two coolers carry the same product number and description (the “Rev.2” we have in the title of this review isn’t part of the actual product title) but the packaging is different. However, be aware that many retailers will be using stock photography for their product pages and there could be old stock still bumming around in some locations. Indeed, even Cogage's website shows the old installation process and mounting hardware.

Even though the True Spirit has been on the market for awhile, neither the old nor the new version are widely available in Canada. However, at the time of this review you can find it at Newegg.ca for under $40. This is exceptional considering there was basically no increase in price over the original version even though we now have a proper backplate-based mounting system.

Has Cogage really fixed what needed to be fixing, while not messing with what was a good overall design? Recently, Zalman with their CNPS10X Flex proved it is possible to tweak a design to make an ordinary cooler extraordinary, so we do have high hopes for the Spirit.

mfg_cogage.jpg

 
Last edited by a moderator:

AkG

Well-known member
Joined
Oct 24, 2007
Messages
5,270
Specifications

Specifications



<img src="http://images.hardwarecanucks.com/image/akg/Air_Cooling/TRUE_Spirit/specs.jpg" border="0" alt="" />
<img src="http://images.hardwarecanucks.com/image/akg/Air_Cooling/TRUE_Spirit/spirit-2.jpg" border="0" alt="" />
<img src="http://images.hardwarecanucks.com/image/akg/Air_Cooling/TRUE_Spirit/spirit-3.jpg" border="0" alt="" />
<img src="http://images.hardwarecanucks.com/image/akg/Air_Cooling/TRUE_Spirit/spirit-4.jpg" border="0" alt="" />
 
Last edited by a moderator:

AkG

Well-known member
Joined
Oct 24, 2007
Messages
5,270
Packaging and Accessories

Packaging and Accessories



As we mentioned in the introduction, the new Cogage TRUE Spirit’s box has undergone a bit of a face-lift. Gone is the less than optimal windowed affair and in its place is a much larger, much more colourful two piece affair with a flap that contains additional information.

Cogage_True_Spirit_box_o2_sm.jpg

When you open the box, you will see that the bottom section contains only the heat sink while the top flap is where all the accessories -including the fan- reside. We like the idea of keeping the fan separate from the cooler as it will reduce in-transit fan killing accidents from happening.

Cogage_True_Spirit_access_sm.jpg

The accessories which accompany the newly revised TRUE Spirit have also undergone their own metamorphosis. The original True Spirit had a push-pin mounting setup which was sadly less than optimal; whereas this one comes with a backplate and mounting bracket.

Unfortunately, Cogage still only ships an Intel 1366-compatible bracket which to us is unacceptable in this day and age. Considering the increasing popularity of AMD’s processors, this omission is a total slap in the face in our opinion. Nonetheless, you also get an installation pamphlet, a Cogage case badge, two wire retention clips for the fan, two anti-vibration strips to reduce fan induced vibrations (and thus noise) and a syringe of TIM.
 
Last edited by a moderator:

AkG

Well-known member
Joined
Oct 24, 2007
Messages
5,270
A Closer Look at the TRUE Spirit

A Closer Look at the TRUE Spirit


Cogage_True_Spirit_ang_sm.jpg
Cogage_True_Spirit_full_sm.jpg

As you can see, the TRUE Spirit really does look like a mini Thermalright Ultra 120 eXtreme….albeit one with a lot less heatpipes. Indeed, even the old Thermalright Ultima 90 has more and that cooler has been out for a long while. In grand total the TRUE Spirit has four 6mm heatpipes and is 133mm by 38mm by 158mm in size while weighing in at a respectable 670 grams which makes it no different from the original iteration.

Both older and newer versions of the True Spirit use four 6mm U shaped heatpipes, two of which start at the left top end, head down through the base (where they are soldered to the base and thus are able to pick up a huge amount of heat) and then climb back up to terminate the right end of the top. The other two heatpipes follow this same route but from right to left.

Cogage_True_Spirit_caps_sm.jpg

As with the previous version of the True Spirit, the top of heatpipes have been capped to give that nice clean look we like so much. We really wish more companies would take the time and either use metal caps on the top of their products’ heatpipes, or hide them in some other fashion like Zalman does. If Cogage can “afford” to do this, so can other manufactures on their more expensive kit.

Cogage_True_Spirit_heatpipes_sm.jpg
Cogage_True_Spirit_face_sm.jpg

The heatpipes have been staggered so as to allow the air from the fan the best possible chance of hitting each and every heatpipe equally with no inefficient dead spots where the heatpipes are competing for cooling (i.e. in each other’s “shadow”).

Just like most other great designs, Cogage has given the Spirit a truly dual face design. In fact it uses the same design as the venerable TRUE in that the face is not only concave to help channel the air towards the centre (and removed the dead zone created in front of the fan’s engine hub) but also the fins themselves are multi-angled. Each fin in the array has half of its edge (per side) angled up and the other half angled downwards. Cogage / Thermalright calls this design a "bent winglet" design and it is an apt description.

Cogage_True_Spirit_base_sm.jpg

The base of this unit is decently finished and considering its price range the Spirit has been designed for, it is not too bad at all. Polishing a solid surface like this base should be easy and relatively inexpensive so there isn’t much excuse for the lack of absolute perfection. As expected the base is not even close to being flat, but this is par for the course and Thermalright does this on purpose as they state it helps “fit” the IHS better and thus is more efficient in transferring the heat from the CPU to the cooler.
 
Last edited by a moderator:

AkG

Well-known member
Joined
Oct 24, 2007
Messages
5,270
The True Spirit 120mm Fan

The True Spirit 120mm Fan


fan_sm.jpg

The 120x25mm fan which accompanies the TRUE Spirit is labeled as “CGG-1212PSL” and is a study in contradictions. Cogage states it runs between 1000-1500RPMs yet at the specifications on the fan itself states 1000-1800RPMs. While an additional 300RPMs isn’t a huge deal on paper, it can translate into significant acoustical differences. The reason for this could be one of two things: either Cogage has limited the voltage in some way we can’t see or the 1800RPMs is within the usual 10% margin of error when it comes to fan RPMs and Cogage wanted to err on the side of marketing lower speeds. As the specifications are so suspect it is hard to state with any certainty what the CFM ratings of this fan puts out but Cogage states 35 – 66.5CFM.

fan2_sm.jpg

The fan is itself exhibits the same moderate ticking which we have come to associate with ball bearing designs and it does exhibit an annoying amount off-axis slop. This can result in a lower lifespan for the fan itself but the more likely thing is that you will be done with this cooler (and maybe even the 1366 socket) long before it kicks the bucket.

4pin_sm.jpg

The fan also has a 4 pin PWM connector. Unfortunately, the wire is not sleeved nor are the wires even bonded together which makes the whole setup look a bit messy when installed into an otherwise clean case. In a nutshell, this is the exact same fan as which accompanied our previous True Spirit.
 
Last edited by a moderator:

AkG

Well-known member
Joined
Oct 24, 2007
Messages
5,270
Installation

Installation


Cogage_True_Spirit_backplate_combo_sm.jpg
Cogage_True_Spirit_backplate_sm.jpg
As with many of the bigger coolers, and unlike the previous iteration of this CPU product, the newly revised True Spirit needs a backplate to be installed. While it will add a few moments of time to the previous pushpin installation we feel that this is time and effort well spent. We have to applaud Cogage for making the decision to revise their popular cooler with a suitable mounting method.

Unfortunately, there are two issues straight off the bat: there is no adhesive backer for the backplate making the whole affair a bit of a challenge to install and it is not compatible with AMD motherboards.

Cogage_True_Spirit_bracket_sm.jpg

Once you slide the X-bracket into place it is relatively easy to install the TRUE Spirit over your CPU, line up the four corners of the brackets and screw in the four spring loaded mounting bolts. Since these retention bolts are not attached to the bracket, we recommend installing them one at a time and only just threading each one in about one turn before moving onto the next bolt. This will not only make it easier to get all four bolts in place but also allow you to keep even pressure applied to the CPU.

Cogage_True_Spirit_top_bracket_sm.jpg

Before you mount the fan you have to peel off and stick two small (yet long) strips of anti-vibration rubber to the face of the cooler. This is a tried and true method of dampening fan vibrations and it works very well. Of course once those strips are in place you place your fan in the proper position and using the two included wire brackets, mount the fan to the cooler.


The True Spirit does stand fairly tall off the board and its fin array is not overly wide so compatibility issues will be kept to a minimum. This combination means you should have no issues with it rubbing, touching or bumping into any of your motherboard’s passive heat sinks or overly tall memory heatspreaders either.

Cogage_True_Spirit_install_sm.jpg
Cogage_True_Spirit_install3_sm.jpg
 
Last edited by a moderator:

AkG

Well-known member
Joined
Oct 24, 2007
Messages
5,270
Testing Methodology

Testing Methodology


To ensure that the results from one review to another are not only reproducible but actually pertinent to this review, the Testing Methodology will be the same throughout all reviews used. If something does change we will be sure to make a special note of it and explain why this change was done and more importantly why things had to be changed or altered.


Thermal Paste and Application Methods:

Arctic Cooling MX-2 thermal paste was used for all coolers during these tests unless otherwise noted.

For all non HDT coolers, application of thermal paste was in accordance with the TIM manufacturer’s instructions; and while not necessary, the TIM was allowed to cure for 24 hours under moderate to high loads (with periods of low loads) prior to testing.

For all 3 pipe HDT coolers two lines of TIM is applied to the two centre metal posts and for all 4 pipe HDTS three (smaller) lines of TIM are applied to the metal posts. This method has been found to provide significantly better coverage than the more typical methods.


Fans Used

120mm:
For all CPU Cooling Solutions which do not come with their own fan, a Noctua NF-P12-1300 and a Scythe S-Flex “G” 1900RPM fan will be used if it accepts 120mm fans. With these two fans we are able to simulate different fan speed conditions as indicated below.


Low Speed:

900RPM with a Noctua NF-P12-1300 with ULNA adapter. To be more precise our specific fan runs at 930RPMs. Any stock fan which comes with the ability of being controlled by means other than the motherboard (e.g. remote fan speed controller, potentiometer, rheostat, etc) will be set to this speed during the low speed test and BOTH sets of performance results will be included.


Moderate Speed:

1300RPM Noctua NF-P12-1300 with NO adapters used. To be more precise our specific fan runs at 1326RPMs. Any stock fan which comes with the ability of being controlled by means other than the motherboard (e.g. remote fan speed controller, potentiometer, rheostat, etc) will be set to this speed during the moderate speed test and BOTH sets of performance results will be included.


High Speed:

1900RPM Scythe S-Flex “G”. To be more precise our specific fan runs at 1860RPMs. Any stock fan which comes with the ability of being controlled by means other than the motherboard (e.g. remote fan speed controller, potentiometer, rheostat, etc) will be set to this speed during the High speed test and BOTH sets of performance results will be included.


Dual Fans*:

Dual NF-P12-1300s

*Dual fans only used if the cooler comes with the necessary mounting hardware.


92mm Fan:

If the cooler being tested only accepts 92mm fans, a Noctua NF-B9-1600 will be used.

If the given CPU cooling solution comes with a stock fan we will also include its numbers in the closest of the main tests BUT we will also include our standard fan results in that particular tests.


Fan Notes:

- If a heatsink cannot mount an aftermarket fan, we will be only including the stock fan results. However, if the stock fan speed can be precisely controlled by means other than the motherboard BIOS (an included remote fan speed controller, potentiometer, rheostat, etc), the cooler will be tested at different fan speeds.

- For dual fan results ALL coolers capable of mounting two fans (and come with the necessary hardware) will be tested with two NF-P12s and the Dual Fan graph will contain data for other such dual capable fan coolers.


We feel that the combination of multiple speeds and multiple fans will allow us to give you our readers clear and precise idea of the capabilities of a given unit, in an accurate comparison. It will also help eliminate the occasional “zinger” such as when a manufacturer includes an extremely high-speed fan in order to possibly offset poor heat sink thermal performance.


Environment:

All comparison testing was done on an open bench with a constant ambient temperature of 24°C. If at any time the room temperature increased or decreased by more than 1°C, testing was halted until the temperature constant was re-established.


Testbed:

tech_station_sm.jpg


Unlike our previous methodology which used an open bench setup with a horizontally orientated motherboard, our new open bench is a modified Tech Station with a twist.

It has been modified so that the motherboard is in a more typical vertical orientation as it would be when installed in a case.

This has been done by the simple expedient of drilling out the bumper pads and threading long bolts (typically used for mounting fans to water cooling radiators) up through the top base of the tech station. Then by simply threading the bolts up through the motherboard we can then secure said motherboard to the tech station. Rubber mounts followed by a nut ensures that nothing moves. When the motherboard has been secured we simply tip the tech station on its side and using weights on the lower “legs” to keep it from tipping over we end up with a vertical orientated motherboard which is safe and secure yet still an open, controlled benching environment.


Mounting Orientation:

Only the typical East / West (aka forward / back) orientation will be used.


Temperature Recording:

Recorded temps were as reported via the Real Temp plug-in for the RivaTuner monitor program.

Max and Average load temps are based on 15 minutes of running Prime95 “small fft” and are taken directly from RivaTuner’s built in capabilities.

The maximum temperatures will be the highest recorded temp displayed for any of the cores during the 15 minute test. While RivaTuner will display each core's average temperature it does not easily show the average of ALL the cores. To this end we will be simply taking the average of all the cores adding them together and then dividing by the number of cores.

If during any test temperatures of 90°C or more are displayed in RivaTuner (for any core) for more than 10 consecutive seconds the testing will be halted and that test run will be considered a "fail".

Idle temperatures are the lowest recorded temperature during idle period as recorded by the RealTemp Rivatuner monitoring program.

All CPU throttling technology was disabled in the BIOS; as was all CPU fan speed control. In addition, Turbo Mode was disabled and Hyperthreading was enabled.

All tests are run a minimum of three times and only the best results are represented.


Charts & Graphs:

Due to clutter and confusion we now will only be including the best of the best. We understand that “best” does mean different things to different people, to this end we will only be including what we feel are the best representatives of the main price ranges. These main prices ranges approximately are Intel OEM (free), $30, $40, $50, $60, and unlimited. Please keep in mind that prices are variable and while we have done our best to pick what we feel best represents a given price range there can and will be some overlap as these price ranges are not set in stone (with the exception being the Intel OEM cooler). To further help clarify a given cooler’s performance we will also be including a seventh CPU cooling solution, a cooling solution which irregardless of price best exemplifies what a good “all round” dual fan capable cooler should be. For the time being this last will be the TRUE Black. After each published cooler review we will re-evaluate the coolers being included in the charts and based on the value or performance may swap out a cooler for a cooler that was just reviewed.

This way you will not only know how it compares to the Intel stock unit and the best Damn Good Value coolers but also the best of the best Damn Good coolers out there. In grand total there will only be 8 coolers represented in a graph. However, if the review is a “round up” review this limitation will be extended to include all coolers in that review plus the above 7 cooling solutions. We will endeavour to keep the number as low as possible while still giving an accurate picture of the performance of all coolers being reviewed.

Each chart will include the Maximum or “peak” temperature we recorded, the average temperature and the idle temperature.

No passive results will be shown UNLESS manufacturer claims the ability to passively cool a processor. If a manufacturer claims passive capabilities we will include the performance numbers in the charts. The only exception to this is if the review is a “review roundup” and to keep the charts from becoming confusing we may not do so.


Sound Pressure Testing:

To give a more accurate and less of a personal opinion on the noise level of the stock fan which accompanies the heatsink, we have included a new section for sound pressure testing. These tests are done in our open case setup outlined above with the meter positioned 30 inches away from the cooler and mounted on a tripod. To ensure the background noise does not skew the results all tests will start by recording the ambient noise of the room. Only when it meets our standards will the testing commence.

To ensure that no external noise unduly skews the results, the GPU used will be a passively cooled unit and the only active fan will be the one on the cooler while the PSU and HDD are isolated away from the immediate area.

These tests are run late at night when no other people or animals are awake and thus unable to influence the results.

All fans are run at their maximum speed with no voltage or PWM control being used during the sound pressure tests.

The sound pressure meter used is a DT-805 which has been professionally calibrated and NIST certified. We will record the highest levels obtained with said meter and record it as our result. The test will be 15 minutes long and will be run while the fan is running full speed via a Molex connector and the CPU cores are under a full load via Prime 95 Small FFT.

Please note: The Scythe S-Flex G and Noctua NF-P12-1300 (at 1300 and 900rpms) numbers are taken when mounted to a Cooler Master Hyper 212+. We feel that it would be extremely unfair and unrealistic to include noise rating for these after market fans if they were NOT mounted onto a cooler. They are included to help give some sense of proportion to the charts and allow you to more easily compare a stock fan against a known quantity.


Complete Test System:


Processor: Intel i7 920

Motherboard: Gigabyte X58-UD3R

Memory: 6GB Aneon Xtune DDR3-1600

Graphics card: EVGA 7300GT passive

Hard Drive: 1x WD 320GB single platter

Power Supply: Topower Powerbird 900W


Special thanks to Direct Canada for their support and supplying the i7 920 CPU.

Special thanks to Gigabyte for their support and supplying the i7 motherboard.
 
Last edited by a moderator:

AkG

Well-known member
Joined
Oct 24, 2007
Messages
5,270
Stock Fan Performance Results

Stock Fan Performance Results


2.6GHz


26_stock.jpg

We knew that those push-pins were limiting the original model and it is great to see our hunch was correct. An average of 1.8°C drop on load temperatures is definitely a good sign.


3.42GHz


34_stock.jpg

As expected, the difference in temperatures between the two versions does increase as the heat is turned up.


3.8GHz


38_stock.jpg

Well the proof is in the pudding as they say and with even just a decent fan this new and improved True Spirit really is a much improved performer thanks to the all new mounting setup it now sports.
 
Last edited by a moderator:

AkG

Well-known member
Joined
Oct 24, 2007
Messages
5,270
High Speed Fan Performance Results

High Speed Fan Performance Results


2.6GHz


26_scythe.jpg

Once again we are seeing a marked improvement in cooling over the previous version. With everything else being equal this improvement has to be because the plastic push-pins originally used on it were holding it back from showing its true potential.


3.42GHz


34_scythe.jpg

Besides the obvious trend of the backplate improving the cooling results of the True Spirit compared to the previous True Spirit, we are also seeing another trend; one which may just shed more light on its real potential. If you look closely at the stock and 3.42GHz tests you will notice that the older True Spirit was consistently losing to the recently released Gelid Tranquillo, but the newer True Spirit is now actually beating it.


3.8GHz


38_scythe.jpg

Unfortunately, the Gelid Tranquillo still seems to have more thermal cooling potential due to its 5 heatpipes, but the numbers the new True Spirit post are still very impressive.
 
Last edited by a moderator:

AkG

Well-known member
Joined
Oct 24, 2007
Messages
5,270
Mid-Speed Fan Performance Results

Mid-Speed Fan Performance Results


2.6GHz


26_p12_1300.jpg

As expected this cooler does not like lower speed fans and really needs high speed, high static pressure fans to shine.


3.42GHz


34_p12_1300.jpg

With results like this we can comfortably say that at lower and moderate heat loads the True Spirit can compete against the big boys. Considering the intended customers of this cooler are not going for insane overclocks that is a ringing endorsement in our books.


3.8GHz


38_p12_1300.jpg

When the heat load is really turned up, the Spirit does start to lose its cool against the big boys. With that being said it still can trade blows with other more modestly price coolers like the Gelid Tranquillo.
 
Last edited by a moderator:
Status
Not open for further replies.

Latest posts

Twitter

Top