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Corsair TX750 750W Power Supply Review

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SKYMTL

HardwareCanuck Review Editor
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Corsair TX750 750W Power Supply Review




Product Number: CMPSU-750TX
Price: $150CAD.......$119.99 after MIR in our Sponsored Deals (signup required)
Fan: 1x 140mm
Warranty: 5-Year
Availability: Now
Manufacturer Product Page: Welcome to Corsair :: TX Power Supply Product Information



Not too long ago Corsair was known for their outstanding memory and flash storage products but they wanted to add something new to their lineup: power supplies. From this decision to branch into unfamiliar territory some of the most highly-renowned power supplies of the last year were born: the HX520 and HX620. I reviewed the Corsair HX620 a little while back and I found that all the hoopla and overly-positive reviews surrounding this unit were perfectly justified. It was one of the best power supplies I had come across during testing and it came at a pretty fair price.

Well, a new day has dawned and Corsair is upgrading their power supply lineup by filling in some gaps that have appeared at the higher and lower ends of the spectrum. A few months ago Corsair launched their VX-series of power supplies (in 450W and 550W outputs) which gave consumers access to Corsair-branded, non-modular power supplies at a price that undercut their original HX-series. This gave our merry band of pirate friends over at Corsair a presence in the lower-end segment but they were still high and dry at higher outputs. This is where the brand new TX-series comes in.

Corsair originally launched the TX-series with their CWT-made TX750W non-modular power supply which I will be looking at in this review. As you have probably already guessed, this power supply is rated at 750W continuous output and carries Corsair’s 5-year warranty. In the last few weeks, Corsair has also launched their TX650W which is Seasonic-built and I wouldn’t be surprised if we see an 850W version sometime down the road. One way or another, at around $150CAD Corsair is once again poised to dominate another price bracket with this 750W power supply. While it may not be modular, the TX750 has one heck of an act to follow considering the HX-series has been one of the best selling power supply lines from ANY manufacturer.

Some of you may be wondering if the move away from Seasonic as an OEM for the TX750 is a wise thing to do. Considering the high quality we are seeing with the current crop of Channel Well built power supplies, I would say that Corsair made a good decision. On the other hand, they have not completely ditched Seasonic since the HX-series continues to be built by them along with the VX450 and TX650. The VX550 as well as the TX750 are made by Channel Well (CWT).

All things considered, if this power supply can continue Corsair’s tradition of amazing performance for a fair price they will probably continue their domination into the 750W category.


 
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SKYMTL

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Packaging & Accessories / Exterior Impressions

Packaging and Accessories


The packaging of the Corsair TX750W looks pretty much the same as the HX620W we reviewed but this time it is decked out in orange accent colors. Corsair has chosen a different accent color for every one of their power supplies and this one is no different with its muted orange. The front of the box shows some minor selling points Corsair wants us to know about as well as the usual 5-year warranty logo.

The back of the box has more technical information such as the efficiency and the fan speed characteristics. There are also a few small pictures detailing some of the more interesting features of the TX750W.


Once the box is opened we get the typically well-packaged Corsair presentation with the power supply nestled in a cocoon of Styrofoam and the cables spilling out to the side. After removing the top piece of padding is removed it is good to see that the TX750W is well protected against scratches by a black fabric bag with the Corsair logo imprinted on it.


The accessories included with this power supply don’t stand out as unique considering you get the bare basics with a power cord (which I will get to in a second) mounting screws a Corsair badge and a quick reference manual.

It seems like more and more manufacturers are going with an anaconda-like 14AWG power cable for their high-wattage power supplies. Corsair has gone the same route here by providing one of these massively thick cords with the TX750W. You will know the second you have it in your hands that this is not your regular power cord.


Exterior Impressions


There is nothing new or particularly unique about the exterior of the TX750W other than the large 140mm exhaust fan and the extremely rugged paint job. In the past I have been critical of quite a few manufacturers since they insist on finishing the exteriors of their power supplies so every scratch and fingerprint will show in horrible detail. Corsair bucks that trend by deciding to go with a particularly utilitarian and scratch-resistant black powder coat that is extremely durable. You should also note that the 140mm fan does cause this power supply to be about ½” longer than a standard ATX power supply with a 120mm fan.

Personally, I happen to like the contrasting orange and black color scheme chosen by Corsair and it goes particularly well with some upcoming DFI motherboards. On the other hand, some people may prefer to go for a plain-looking power supply without the loud orange accent color.
 
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SKYMTL

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Cables & Connectors

Cables and Connectors

- Molex: 8 Connectors
o 2x 34” (4 connectors each)

- SATA: 8 Connectors
o 2x 34” length (4 connectors each)

- PCI-E 6+2 Pin: 4 Connectors
o 4x 24” length

- 20+4 ATX Connector: 23” length

- 4+4 Pin CPU Connector: 19 1/2” length

- Floppy: 2 Connectors
o 2x 38 1/2” (@ end of Molex cables)


After the last Corsair power supply I reviewed, I was used to Corsair’s outstanding modular design but the TX750 only has fixed cables. This isn’t too big of a deal except that with the quantity and lengths of the cables, it does get a bit tedious tucking them all away. Even though I prefer modular power supplies, I have to say that the connector selection Corsair chose for this power supply is second to none. There are an amazing number of Molex and SATA connectors and the inclusion of FOUR 8-pin PCI-E connectors is a new record for power supplies we have tested. With all of these connectors, the TX750 is ready for whatever the future may throw at it.

No matter how many connectors a power supply may have, they won’t be worth spit if they can’t reach your components. Fortunately, Corsair has hit the nail on the head with the lengths of the cables on the TX750. Every single one of the cables is extremely long and was able to reach the bottom 2900XT in our Gigabyte Aurora 570 case without any problem. The sleeving on all of the cables is also top-notch as well.


All of the Molex connectors are equipped with quick-release tabs which really come in hand when disconnecting these connectors. I find that not enough power supplies incorporate these tabs onto their Molex connectors so it is good to see them here.

Since all of the PCI-E connectors are of the 6+2 pin variety, they can be used as both 8-pin and 6-pin connectors depending on which application you choose them for. Each PCI-E cable is independent unlike some of the power supplies we have reviewed in the past which use 2 PCI-E connectors per cable. Personally, I like Corsair’s approach much more since it doesn’t leave the second connector flapping around the inside of your case if you use only one.


The only thing that somewhat bothers me about the cables on the Corsair TX750 is the fact that they are not completely sleeved all the way into the housing. If Corsair would have left the opening into the housing sans rubber grommet, I would not have docked some points. Yet, they have foreseen the potential problems this can cause and have provided the grommet to protect the bare cables. Thus, instead of being a danger for the cables, this lack of complete sleeving only makes the cables look slightly unsavory.
 
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SKYMTL

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Output Characteristics / Interior Impressions

Output Characteristics


For this power supply, Corsair has gone with a single massive 60A +12V rail which can output 720W of power. I have said it once and I will say it again: having a large +12V rail is a must in this day and age. Nearly all of the most power hungry components draw power from the +12V rail(s) and having 96% of the total power available on the +12V rail like the TX750 does ensures sufficient power delivery. To tell you the truth, this 60A of available power on the +12V rail is extremely high for a 750W power supply.


Interior Impressions


The interior of the TX750 is quite typical for a CWT-built power supply with its solid ribbed heatsinks and wrapped chokes. It seems like all of the components were shoe-horned onto the single PCB so they could fit into a power supply with a 120mm intake fan. You can see evidence of this with the inch of space between the main PCB and the right-hand edge of the power supply casing.


There is a small secondary PCB located on one side of the TX750 which holds the primary fan connector but it also holds two other connectors. Unfortunately, I couldn’t trace where the wires coming out of these two connectors went but it looks like one of them runs back onto the primary PCB’s +5V solder points.


The primary capacitor is a 105*C Matsushita unit while those on the secondary are exclusively Nippon Chemi-Con caps. Both of these choices are top-notch and run will with the high-output design of this Corsair power supply.
 
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SKYMTL

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Performance Tests

Performance Tests

Processor: Intel Core 2 Quad Q6600 @ 3.5Ghz (B3)
Memory: 4GB Corsair Dominator DDR3 @ 1600Mhz (Thanks to Corsair)
Motherboard: Asus Blitz Extreme
Graphics Cards: 2X Gigabyte HD2900XT 512MB
Disk Drive: Pioneer DVD Writer
Hard Drive: Seagate Barracuda 320GB SATAII
Fans: 5X Yate Loon 120mm @ 1200RPM
Monitor: LG Flatron L2000CN-BF (1600X1200)

For our complete power supply testing methodology, please go here: Hardware Canucks Power Supply Testing Methodology


Efficiency Testing



The efficiency displayed by the Corsair TX750 is quite good all-around. While is wasn’t as good as the Cooler Master Real Power Pro we tested a few weeks ago, it is still a good 3-5% more efficient than the Silverstone DA850.


Voltage Regulation Testing


+5V Voltage Regulation



Without a doubt, this Corsair power supply is at the top of the heap when it comes to +5V regulation…even though I do not have the +5V rail loaded that much. This low load on this rail happens with most modern computer systems.


+3.3V Voltage Regulation



The TX750 continues its superb performance in the +3.3V regulation tests.


+12V Voltage Regulation



While the voltage regulation of the TX750 is second to none, there are a few interesting points that should be picked out of the results. First of all you will notice that as the load increases, in some cases the voltages actually go up instead of going south unlike we see with other power supplies. In this case the different voltage drops are due to the idle and CPU Load tests being measured from the EPS12V connector while the Game and System Stress results were taken from a PCI-E connector.


+12V Ripple Testing



The Corsair TX750W finishes out battery of tests with flying colors by putting out some of the best numbers I have seen in the ripple suppression tests. I was particularly surprised my its poise in the highest load test.


Heat & Acoustical Performance

Considering the amount of load I put on this power supply, I was half expecting the fan speed to increase quite a bit by the System Stress test. Fortunately, the huge 140mm fan stayed quiet throughout the tests and was quite a bit more silent that the majority of the other fans in the case it was installed into.

With the fan spinning silently away, the exhaust temperatures never increased to the point where it would have been time to worry.
 
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SKYMTL

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Joined
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Messages
12,861
Location
Montreal
Conclusion

Conclusion

The Corsair TX750W is one of those power supplies that everyone dreams of having but until now this caliber of performance was far outside of their budgets. This power supply completely bucks the assumption that the most stable power supplies are reserved to those few who have over $200 to spend on a single upgrade. Not only does the TX750 offer performance which is head and shoulders above some highly-regarded 850W units but it is priced at a mind-boggling $150. Even though the price will make you initially wonder at the quality of Corsair’s new offering, the tests prove that a new bar has been set in the price / performance category. All the greatest performance numbers wouldn’t mean much if the company providing the product left you high and dry without a warranty or tech support. Corsair comes through here as well with a 5-year warranty along with an active support forum and quick technical support.

I am sure that there were a lot of people out there who were silently grimacing at the change in OEMs away from Seasonic and onto Channel Well for this power supply. Well, the performance figures put down by the TX750 bear witness to the fact that the choice of CWT was a good one since quality has not suffered in any way, shape or form. Corsair has a history of making great decisions when it comes to power supplies and the TX750 continues this tradition.

I usually use this part of the conclusion to discuss the downfalls of the product being reviewed but to tell you the truth; I can’t find anything I don’t like about this power supply. Sure, it could have been modular to make the massive amount of cables a bit more cooperative and efficiency could have been ever so slightly higher but that is just nitpicking. The one thing I do wish for would be for the sleeving on the cables to continue all the way into the metal housing.

Corsair seriously hit the nail on the head with this power supply; it provides high performance at a price that should have customers seriously looking at the TX750. What we have here is proof that the HX620 and HX520 were not just lucky shots in the dark and Corsair is dead serious about dominating the power supply market. The TX750 is the next logical step in the evolution of the Corsair power supply lineup and is one hell of a step in the right direction.

Pros:

- Unreal performance
- Price
- Long Cables
- Quiet
- 5-year warranty
- Four 8-pin PCI-E connectors

Cons:

- Not modular. (is that really a con?)




Thanks goes out to Corsair for providing us with this power supply

 
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