What's new
  • Please do not post any links until you have 3 posts as they will automatically be rejected to prevent SPAM. Many words are also blocked due to being used in SPAM Messages. Thanks!

Work in progress Fixed angle 32" monitor stand (Portrait mode Pinball)

sswilson

Moderator
Staff member
Joined
Dec 9, 2006
Messages
19,295
Location
Moncton NB
There went a good couple of hours wasted this morning..... :rolleyes:

I'm not much of a planner when it comes to building something... I much prefer to get a general idea in my head of what I want to do, and then wing it from there.... Unfortunately, without some kind of mock-up or detailed plans to go by there are sometimes design elements that have a critical flaw in the way I'm thinking of them.....

monitor ledge full image-1.jpg

All along, my plan has been to have the monitor resting on a ledge at the front/bottom, and then be supported internal to the frame I've already got built. It's basically going to be resting on the frame and held in by gravity (Haven't decided yet if I'm going to create some kind of vesa mount in the rear for it). In my mind that was all going great but I was making an error that wasn't obvious until I'd built that ledge in....

monitor ledge short corner-1.jpg

In my mind the plan assumed that the resting point for the bottom of the monitor was on the outside edge of the frame and I designed accordingly with a nice short ledge that the monitor could rest in.....

Once I had it all built up and had a look at it, I realised the error of my ways and that the resting point for the bottom was (just like the rest of them) in fact the inside edge and not the outside edge.....

monitor ledge long corner-1.jpg

Not a big deal to fix, but it made a mess of the top where one didn't need to be.... :(

edit: Now that I'm looking at it closely, we'll see how it fits once the monitor is in there but I may end up adding a second piece that's flush with the front "crossbeam".
 
Last edited:

Izerous

Well-known member
Folding Team
Joined
Feb 7, 2019
Messages
955
Location
Edmonton
I think a proper countersink bit would go a long ways in your hands instead of a spade bit. Using a spade for that purpose kinda feels like using a mini sledge to pound in a finishing nail.
 

sswilson

Moderator
Staff member
Joined
Dec 9, 2006
Messages
19,295
Location
Moncton NB
I think a proper countersink bit would go a long ways in your hands instead of a spade bit. Using a spade for that purpose kinda feels like using a mini sledge to pound in a finishing nail.
Yep, but I've got one on hand, and it kinda works..... :)

All of my countersunk holes for flush mount hardware was done the same way.... It's crude but it gets the job done.
 

sswilson

Moderator
Staff member
Joined
Dec 9, 2006
Messages
19,295
Location
Moncton NB
Getting close to finished phase one. Initial assembly completed and currently partially disassembled to throw a bit of stain onto the new pieces of wood (will dry overnight). Monitor has been test fitted and only minor adjustments need to be made (shimming one side and stops at the bottom).

cardboard box mockup-1.jpg

I know I said I don't like to plan things, but I will do mockups to test fit if they're easy enough.... It just so happened that this particular box (folded in this manner) was exactly the same height, and within 1/4" of the width of my monitor. The cutouts on the side are where I want to be able to easily access ports, and the top/bottom cutouts are where the back extends out a bit so I may end up having to file down a groove for them.

Installing inner braces with monitor mockup-1.jpg

This is how that worked... I didn't need any special access on the far left of this image so I used a full length of wood, while I used 3 (one's not installed yet) smaller pieces on the other side in the gaps on the mockup.

completed pre adjustment-1.jpg

Almost complete, but if you notice... the new brace on the left isn't as far into the gap as the ones on the right. I realised after I'd installed that particular brace that the measurements I'd been working off of for width were of the base and rear column, but that my main support "beam" (for lack of a better word) was slightly different stock and thus was 1/4" off on both sides of the gap so I was short a full 1/2". If I had kept with that gap on both sides the monitor could have been supported, but only if it was directly in the middle and it would fall through if moved all the way to the right or left.

This wouldn't have happened if I was using all the same stock, but the fact that I was using scrap wood meant that most of it was 3" while the angled support was only 2 1/2" wide and I didn't pick up on how that was affecting my measurements until this point in time.

Sooo.... all that's said and done... you'll notice the R/H braces protrude much further into the gap, and I went back to do this.....

adjusted inner bracket-1.jpg

It ain't pretty, but I managed to salvage moving the inner brace over by using the original holes in the main brace, but that was awfully close to the edge of the inner brace so I added three more screws closer to the center of the inner brace for added support.
 

sswilson

Moderator
Staff member
Joined
Dec 9, 2006
Messages
19,295
Location
Moncton NB
Holy crap, this is coming along nicely.(y)
Thanks, I'm pretty happy so far with how it's turning out in spite of the hiccups. My 3D printer is getting a heavier workout than I thought it was going to originally.

Monitor full back upright.jpg
Monitor side view.jpg

This is what I'm working on while I wait for the second coat of stain to dry....

Most "thin" monitors/TVs these days aren't symmetrical on the rear. Typically the top 2/3s are just the depth of the screen + casing and the lower half is deeper to house the electronics. In the case of this monitor, there are 3 distinct depths that I have to adjust for with some kind of shims.

Currently printing off 2 of 3 shims for the side rails, and once those are done I'll start on the front ones. (I'm getting a decent tinkercad workout for relatively simple but "precise" parts).

edit: And gee... doesn't the finish on that bed look an awful lot like the finish on the wood stock I've used for most of this build???? :unsure:
 
Last edited:

Izerous

Well-known member
Folding Team
Joined
Feb 7, 2019
Messages
955
Location
Edmonton
3d printer is actually one of the odder choices for some of the pieces, cool though.

Ie those brackets not having a 3d printer would have use scrap metal and a vice or metal brake (have a small one for thin stuff).

Shims depending on size would have ripped from a 2x4 and painted to match the rest of what your making.
 

sswilson

Moderator
Staff member
Joined
Dec 9, 2006
Messages
19,295
Location
Moncton NB
3d printer is actually one of the odder choices for some of the pieces, cool though.

Ie those brackets not having a 3d printer would have use scrap metal and a vice or metal brake (have a small one for thin stuff).

Shims depending on size would have ripped from a 2x4 and painted to match the rest of what your making.
Definitely. None of what I've done so far really needs a 3D printer, but I have one on hand and with my low woodworking skillset it's actually easier for me personally than trying to figure out how to get the exact measurement I need/want out of a tablesaw / miter.

If I were doing it again, I most certainly wouldn't do the 50 deg printed bracket. It was hard to work with, and I'm not sure how much extra strength it brought to the table. I was looking at it and wondering if a 3 or 2" door hinge couldn't be used to strengthen up that joint.
 
Last edited:

Izerous

Well-known member
Folding Team
Joined
Feb 7, 2019
Messages
955
Location
Edmonton
Flat stock bent in a vice with a hammer to 50' would have been more than sufficient. 90 is super easy 50' is a bit trickier.
 
Top