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GeForce 9800 GT Roundup (EVGA, ASUS, Gigabyte & Palit)

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SKYMTL

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GeForce 9800 GT Video Card Roundup (EVGA, ASUS, Gigabyte & Palit)





GeForce 9800 GT Video Card Roundup (EVGA, Gigabyte, ASUS & Palit)




Usually, when a new graphics card is released it is impossible to ignore all the reviews and flurry of forum posts that are kicked up in its wake. There are however those odd times when a card sneaks itself into the market without nary whimper from the usual sources and the things literally start showing up at retailers without rhyme or reason. This generation of Nvidia cards has seen several almost-silent releases with the 8800GS and 9600GSO which had reviews here and there but not much was made of their appearance. Today we will be looking at another card which has popped up in at retailers without the usually marching bands and fireworks: the 9800 GT.

Knowing many of you who read these reviews, we think it is safe to say that the release of the 9800 GT has gone largely unnoticed by the majority of tech-savvy consumers. It will without a doubt add even more confusion to the already-crowded Nvidia lineup but it also represents (in some cases) a minor evolution of the now-legendary 8800 GT. Truth be told, many of the G92 cores on the 9800 GT cards on the market have initially been 65nm but supposedly as time passes, there will be some 55nm products released as well. The interesting thing about these cards is that while their reference design is identical to that of the 8800GT 512MB, many of Nvidia’s board partners have decided to go with a non-reference approach straight off the line. This will differentiate them from the 8800 GT cards they are replacing while giving some value-added features along the way. However, as you will see along the way in this review, the 9800GT product range has already become the Wild West with some board partners using “unlocked” cores while others are using standard cores. If you are scratching you head now, wait till you read a bit further.

The raison-d’être of the 9800 GT is a bit of a mystery considering it is being offered in two distinct flavors of core architecture: 55nm and 65nm. With the recent deep price cuts to the 8800 GT cards, it is safe to say that the 9800 GT has come into being to try to liquidate yet more 65nm GPU cores so Nvidia can fully move their lineup to the more efficient and higher profit margin 55nm manufacturing process. Unfortunately, as mentioned there is an overlap with the 9800 GT cards since some hold the older 65nm core while others may use 55nm core, but how will consumers know which one they are getting? The long and short of it is that in many cases they won’t. After talking to a number of manufacturers, some don’t even plan on labeling the 55nm cards as such but hopefully that will change.

Since there have not been many reviews of this card which will eventually replace the 8800GT, we have decided to take a fundamentally different approach this time around and get enough samples to do a full-fledged roundup. A number of companies were more than happy to step up to the plate so today we will present you with cards from Gigabyte, ASUS, Palit and EVGA. While all of these board partners have fundamentally different policies and warranties, they usually all release a reference version and eventually move on to either overclocked or non-reference designs. What makes this roundup a bit different is that NOT ONE of these cards is the same; some have custom PCBs, others are overclocked and one has the underpinnings of an 8800GTS 512MB. So, I guess you could say that this will be one interesting review.

While we could talk and talk about what is new about these cards, let’s save that for another section and get on with this.

 
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The Current Nvidia Lineup

The Current Nvidia Lineup



Here it is; the new Nvidia lineup in all its glory and there are some pretty significant changes that we can see right off the bat. The most notable of these changes is the discontinuation of the short-lived 9800 GX2 as Nvidia’s flagship product which is now replaced by the GeForce GTX 280 and to a lesser extent the GTX 260 as well. The rest of the Nvidia high to mid-range lineup stays pretty much the same with cards like the 8800GT and 9600GT receiving some pretty steep price cuts of late. There has also been the addition of the 9800 GTX+ and the 9800GT of which the former uses the new 55nm manufacturing process. Dropped from the lineup are quite a few cards including the 9800GTX in favour of the plus model. The 9800GT on the other hand is basically an 8800GT with a few features thrown in for good measure and uses either 65nm or a new 55nm core.


Some of you (ok, MANY of you) are probably wondering why Nvidia is pushing their partners to transition to the 9800GT if it is the same thing as the venerable 8800GT and believe it or not, we were wondering the same thing…and still are. All indications point towards the lineup being completely devoid of any 8-series cards by the end of the year which is a pretty laudable goal. However, we would have MUCH rather seen the 8800GT become the 9800GT once the 55nm core was in ALL of the cards.

You all may have seen a trend within the last few weeks of rapidly falling GT200-series prices in the face of rising competition from ATI’s new cards and because of this these cards have actually become somewhat affordable. Granted, nearly $450 for a single GTX 280 is no small chunk of change but it sure beats the astronomical $680 it was released at. The same goes for the GTX 260 but to a somewhat lesser extent with price cuts bringing it in at a shade over $300 putting it in direct competition with the HD4870 from ATI.

Sitting at the top of this new lineup is the GTX 280 which is equipped with 1GB of GDDR3 memory working at 2214Mhz (DDR) and is basically on-par with what we saw with the GX2. Also gone are the days were we see a 256-bit memory interface on something that is deemed a “high-end” product since the GTX 280 now uses a 512-bit interface. This should eliminate many of the claimed bottlenecks of the narrower interface used on cards like the 9800 GTX. The core speed (which includes the ROPs and TMUs) operates at 602Mhz which is quite interesting since many pundits claimed that with the switch to a 65nm manufacturing process we would see a rapid incline in clock speeds. This has not happened with the core of the G2T00 series it seems.

Looking at the “little brother” GTX 260, it seems that there was quite a bit of pruning going on with lower clock speeds and less memory being the flavour of the day while also being combined with less processor cores. This in effect lowers its price and makes it easier to produce in volume but at the same time it could offer significant performance decreases when compared with the GTX 280.

To keep with their new parallel processing mentality, Nvidia has changed the name of their Stream Processors (or shader processors depending on your mood) to “processor cores”. There are 240 of these so-called processor cores in the GTX 280’s GT200 core which operate at 1296Mhz with those on the GTX 260 operate at a bit more mundane 1242Mhz. This speed is once again quite a bit less than what we are used to seeing with past Nvidia products but considering the number of processors, we can consider this a brute force approach rather than the finesse which comes with faster speeds.
 
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SKYMTL

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9800 GT Features

9800 GT Features

By now some of you may be wondering how this card really differs from the 8800 GT since at face value the 9800 GT is just another G92-based card with a few extra features thrown in. Things get a bit complicated however since some 9800 GT cards have certain features while others do not. Truth be told, nearly all 9800 GT cards are nothing more than 8800 GT cards with a simple BIOS flash performed but board partners are able to add a number of technologies to differentiate their cards from a run of the mill 8800 GT. Let’s take a look at some of these features and trust me, it gets confusing so hang onto your hats and pay attention since EVERY ONE of these features except the PhysX processing and Purevideo HD is OPTIONAL so some 9800 GTcards may have none while others may have every one of the following features.


Optional Full HDMI Output


All 9800 GTcards come with the option for full HDMI output over a DVI to HDMI adaptor. Notice we said “option”? Well, unlike their ATI-supporting counterparts, Nvidia board partners are not required to provide an HDMI adaptor but some in this review do. In order for the 9800 GT to be fully compliant, the manufacturer must include an S/PDIF audio connector along with the adaptor in order to pass audio signals to the card which will in turn pass down the HDMI cable. It is still possible for a card to support HDMI without the S/PDIF connector but you will only get video instead of a combination of video and high definition audio.


Purevideo HD


To put it into a nutshell, Purevideo HD is Nvidia’s video processing software that offloads up to 100% of the high definition video encoding tasks from your CPU onto your GPU. In theory, this will result in lower power consumption, better feature support for Blu-ray and HD-DVD and better picture quality.


In addition to dynamic contrast enhancement, Purevideo HD has a new feature called Color Tone Enhancement. This feature will dynamically increase the realism and vibrancy for green and blue colors as well as skin tones.


HybridPower


By far, the most interesting feature supported by the 9800 GT is Nvidia’s new HybridPower which is compatible with HybridPower-equipped motherboards. It allows you to shift power between the integrated GPU and your 9800 GT so if you aren’t gaming, you can switch to integrated graphics to save on power, noise and heat. What is interesting about this is that some of these new 9800 GT cards will be labeled as “HybridPower Compatible” or have the HybridPower moniker in their product names while other will not. Make sure you look at the specs for the card you are looking at very closely if this feature is a selling point for you.


While we have not seen if this technology works, it is definitely an interesting concept since it should allow for quite a bit of flexibility between gaming and less GPU-intensive tasks. There has been more than once where I have been working in Word in the summer where I wished my machine would produce less heat so I wouldn’t be roasting like a stuffed turkey. If this technology can deliver on what it promises, this technology would be great for people who want a high-powered graphics card by night and a word processing station by day.


This technology even works if you have 9800 GTcards working in SLI and once again you should (in theory) be able to shut down the two high-powered cards when you don’t need them.


All HybridPower-equipped motherboards come with both DVI and VGA output connectors since all video signals from both the on-board GPU and any additional graphics cards go through the integrated GPU. This means you will not have to switch the connector when turning on and off the power-hungry add-in graphics cards. All in all, this looks to be great on paper but we will have to see in the near future if it can actually work as well as it claims to. In terms of power savings, this could be a huge innovation.


PhysX Technology


About two years ago there were many industry insiders who predicted that physics implementation would be the next Big Thing when it came to new games. With the release of their PhysX PPU, Ageia brought to the market a stand-alone physics processor which had the potential to redefine gaming. However, the idea of buying a $200 physics card never appealed to many people and the unit never became very popular with either consumers or game developers. Fast forward to the present time and Nvidia now has control over Ageia’s PhysX technology and will be putting it to good use in their all their cards featuring a unified architecture. This means that PhysX suddenly has an installed base numbering in the tens of millions instead of the tiny portion who bought the original PPU. Usually, a larger number of potential customers means that developers will use a technology more often which will lead to more titles being developed for PhysX.

Since physics calculations are inherently parallel, the thread dispatcher in the unified shader architecture is able to shunt these calculations to the appropriate texture processing cluster. This means a fine balancing act must be done since in theory running physics calculations can degrease rendering performance of the GPU. However, it seems like Nvidia is working long and hard to get things balanced out properly so turning up in game physics will have a minimal affect on overall graphics performance.
 

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Gigabyte 9800 GT 512MB (GV-N98TZL-512H)

Gigabyte 9800 GT 512MB (GV-N98TZL-512H)


Product Number: GV-N98TZL-512H
Manufacturer’s Product Page: GIGABYTE - GV-N98TZL-512H
Price: Click to Compare Prices
Warranty: 3 Years




The first card we have in this whirlwind review is Gigabyte’s entry into the 9800 GT scene. While for all intents and purposes it is a stock-clocked card, there is much more to this card than what first meets the eye. Since this is not you run-of-the-mill 9800GT, pricing is at the upper end of the spectrum in the scope of this roundup at around $180. Gigabyte also has a standard 3-year warranty which should serve most people perfectly well considering the average length many enthusiasts keep their cards before upgrading.

It should be noted that this is the exact same card as Gigabyte’s GV-NX88T512HPV1 8800 GT card which was overclocked to 700Mhz on the core. Unfortunately, this card is not overclocked like the 8800 GT version so it will probably perform in-line with the other stock-clocked cards.


The packaging on this card is basic fare when it comes to Gigabyte with plenty of Asian influence as evidenced by the anime character sporting the ridiculously huge gun. Other than the indications of HybridPower and the cooling solution Gigabyte used, there is also some talk of the Gamer HUD overclocking and voltage control panel. Since we don’t really have the space nor the time to focus on the Gamer HUD, let’s just say that it is like the other manufacturer-included overclocking and temperature monitoring software but it also includes GPU core voltage adjustments. Unfortunately, no matter what we did, increasing the voltage didn’t affect the card’s overclock one iota so we have to wonder if this feature actually works.


The accessories are pretty much what we have come to expect but Gigabyte has included a HDMI dongle which is a nice touch. Why they didn’t include an S/PDIF cable is completely mind-boggling since as you will see the card itself has a connector on it but Gigabyte couldn’t give us a good answer as to its absence. Other than that you get a molex to PCI-E adaptor and a pair of DVI to VGA connectors.


The Gigabyte 9800 GT is definitely unique with a completely custom blue PCB and a Zalman heatsink. While it may look copper, the cooler is actually painted aluminum but as you will see a bit later, it performs amazingly well for such a pint-sized unit. We can also see that the ram modules are completely uncovered without ramsinks in sight but because the fan blows air onto the ICs so heat shouldn’t be an issue at all.


This is our favorite part about this card: it is perfectly suited for HTPC use since it is a good ½ inch shorter than a standard 9800GT. Unlike longer cards that sometimes have issues fitting into some mATX cases; this one fits perfectly into the most cramped spaces since it is only 8 3/8” long.


Another aspect of this card being well-suited for HTPC use is the fact that it has an S/PDIF connector right on the card but unfortunately the actual cable which should have been included is MIA. Gigabyte has also included a very robust power distribution section on their card with a 4-phase design and high-end inductors. The components that were used are rated for higher temperatures than normal VRMs so they do not need additional cooling.
 
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EVGA 9800 GT 512MB HybridPower (512-P3-N980-AR)

EVGA 9800 GT 512MB HybridPower (512-P3-N980-AR)


Product Number: 512-P3-N980-AR
Manufacturer’s Product Page: EVGA | Products
Price: Click here to compare prices
Warranty: Lifetime




We decided to keep at least one bone stock card in this roundup which didn’t have a fancy PCB or gobs of overclocked goodness so what we have here is just that. Even though they have a virtual harem of 9800 GT cards, EVGA’s 9800 GT HybridPower is as stock as they come but it adds the optional HybridPower compatibility and an HDMI output for good measure. In the graphics card world, EVGA is one company that is universally respected for both their lifetime warranty and their trade-up program but is also lauded for the great customer service they provide. Pricing for this card has seen its ups and downs over the short time it has been around for but it stands around $170 right now which makes it one of the least expensive cards in this roundup.


The usual black and white EVGA box is carried over into the 9800 GT series with its usual panache and subtleties and a bit of added green for good measure. There is an indication on the front of the package of the included HDMI connector which should serve those of you buying it at your local mom and pop shop well. It should also be mentioned that every EVGA card comes with their new Precision Graphics Tuning program which is basically a fancy name for an overclocking and monitoring program. Nonetheless, it is good to see companies catering to those willing to delve into the world of overclocking.


The accessory package which comes with this EVGA card contains everything we could possibly want along with the one thing we wished for when looking at Gigabyte’s card: an S/PDIF audio connector. You also get a Molex to 6-pin adaptor, EVGA case badge, DVI to VGA connector and a HDMI dongle. All in all this is a pretty well-rounded accessory package for those of you who want to take advantage of the HDMI feature.


If you put this card next to a reference 8800GT, you would definitely be hard pressed to tell the difference between the two and that is because…well, this IS an 8800 GT (like almost all the other cards you will see here today) with a few extra bangs and whistles. Between the original incarnation of this single-slot heatsink and what you see here, the fan size has been substantially increased in order to provide better cooling on such a minimalistic cooling design. Speaking of the heatsink, having a single-slot solution is great but it unfortunately keeps all the heat produced by the card within the immediate confines of whichever enclosure it is within.

Just remember that this is a standard-size card so while it is not the overly-long beast we have seen with the 9800 GT X and above, it is still 9” long.


The overall design on the heatsink should be quite familiar to those of you who have EVGA 8800GT cards since it has almost the same stylized logo and black background. Like on some of the other cards you will see in this roundup, there is an S/PDIF connector on the card itself to take advantage of the audio pass-through to the HDMI connector.
 
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Palit 9800 GT Sonic 512MB (NE/980TSXT352)

Palit 9800 GT 512MB Sonic (NE/980TSXT352)


Product Number: NE/980TSXT352
Manufacturer’s Product Page: Palit Microsystems Ltd.
Price: Click here to compare prices
Warranty: 2 Years


From looking at the specs alone, it seems like Palit has taken the stock 9800 GT and added a bit of spice to it with some not so insignificant overclocks. The core gets a 50Mhz bump to 650Mhz while the memory grabs 100Mhz (DDR) more as well. Palit has priced this card a bit below even some stock-clocked cards at about $160 but you don’t get any of the bangs and whistles such as HybridPower and a HDMI output. You also get what some would call a cut-rate warranty which currently stands at a paltry single year. This is pretty much at the bottom rung when it comes to Nvidia cards but 2 years is still longer than most of us keep our cards.


From one card to the next, all of Palit’s Nvidia boxes are almost the exact same with very slight changes. This one includes the usual Palit Frog along with a few logos listing the features of the card. Palit has always garnered our appreciation for listing the actual clock speeds of their cards right on the front of the box which means the customer won’t need to search high and low or them in a retail store.

The accessories which come with this card are completely bog-standard with a Molex to 6-pin power adaptor and a DVI to VGA dongle being the only extras other than the driver CD and installation booklet. However, the two Palit cards in this roundup are the only ones to include a game into their accessory packages. While Tomb Raider isn’t exactly the most popular franchise anymore, the Anniversary edition Palit has here should keep you entertained for a couple hours at least.


When you get your first glance of the Palit 9800 GT Sonic, there will be no mistaking that this is one unique card which has been custom built by Palit. Not only does it come with a custom heatsink but all of the ram chips are also covered by a piece of shaped aluminum in order to dissipate the heat they generate. Even though there are many detractors of this kind of heatsink configuration since all of the heat generated by the core will stay within the confines of your case, the G92 core does not produce an huge amount of heat so the negative impacts will be minimal at most.

We have also come to know Palit for having a somewhat unique frame of mind when it comes to audio and video outputs on their cards. With this card they have forgone any departure from the reference design and have stayed the course with two DVI connectors and a single TV-out port.


While the Palit Sonic is much like the Gigabyte 9800 GT we saw previously in that it has a completely custom PCB, it remains the same length as a reference card at 9”. Since they had basically a blank slate to work with, Palit’s extensive team of engineers significantly beefed up the power distribution section by adding 4-phase power, higher-rated capacitors and industrial spec’d inductors. They also included an S/PDIF connector on the card but unfortunately, the lads over in the penny-pinching department cut out the S/PDIF connector from the accessory package.
 
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ASUS 9800 GT Ultimate (EN9800GT U/HTDP/512M)

ASUS EN9800 GT Ultimate (EN9800GT U/HTDP/512M)


Product Number: EN9800GT U/HTDP/512M
Manufacturer’s Product Page: ASUSTeK Computer Inc.
Price: Approx. $180
Warranty: 3 Years


We have finally come to the Big Boy in this roundup in the guise of an ASUS card. Looking at the specs I am sure that you can see that this ASUS 9800 GT Ultimate is the mack-daddy of all the 9800 GT cards we are testing here today. Instead of taking a somewhat mundane 8800 GT and flashing the BIOS, the alchemists at ASUS began their concoction with a ready to rock 8800 GTS 65nm core with 128 shaders, added a massive cup of overclocking and let their creation brew for a good long time. The result is a 9800 GT on steroids which is clocked to within spitting distance of the 9800GTX+ while retailing for about $180 before rebates. From the specs alone, this card is simply drool-worthy as it is built for speed and nothing else since all of the other 9800 GT fluff like HybridPower and HDMI output is kicked to the curb.

While finding this beast here in Canada is a bit hard, our friends to the south can find it in abundance at a number of large etailers. We are told by ASUS that we should be seeing stock of this card soon so the wait won’t be too long. It comes backed by the usual 3-year warranty from ASUS which can’t be classified as long but as we have mentioned again and again: it is a heck of a lot longer than most of you keep your card.


While ASUS may be known for their large boxes, this one is surprisingly compact for such an illustrious card. There is mention of the different utilities such as Smart Doctor which are included as well as giving a bit of a hint as to the performance increases we are likely to see. Let’s be honest here; a 22% increase in 3DMark Vantage scores is no small thing so it will be interesting to see if this actually carries through.


Since this is a special edition card from ASUS, the interior packaging is quite a bit different from what we are used to seeing. All of the accessories and the card itself are packaged separately from one-another in sumptuous black compartments, each bearing the ASUS logo in gold lettering.

No matter how out of the ordinary the box is, the list of accessories is somewhat toned down with just the basics included. You get the usual power adaptor, DVI to VGA dongle and a TV-Out RGB cable. There is also an instruction manual along with driver and software CDs. Like Gigabyte, ASUS includes their proprietary overclocking and monitoring software called SmartDoctor.


When we first alluded to this having nearly identical specifications to a highly overclocked 8800GTS 512MB, we weren’t stretching things at all since for all intents and purposes that is exactly what it is. It seems that while other manufacturers are busy recycling their 8800GT cards into “9800GT” products, ASUS found a few spare cards with 128 Stream Processors sitting around their warehouse and pressed them into service. This suits us just fine since this is what we feel the 9800 GT SHOULD have been.

The dual slot cooler used on the Ultimate is exactly the same one used on the 8800GTS 512MB with a teal-green sticker applied to it for good measure. While this color scheme does make the card look a bit feminine, it’s what is underneath that counts and let me tell you right now: this one is an ass-kicker. Even though it is made of a lot tougher stuff than other cards in this roundup, it still keeps the norm at 9” long.


What distinguishes this heatsink from the others is that it is a full-cover dual slot affair which has a vaulted fan design which pushes cool air down onto a fin assembly and then out the back of the card. You won’t have to worry about higher case temperatures as you will with other cards presented in this roundup.
 
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Palit 9800 GT Super+ 1GB (NE/9800TXT302)

Palit 9800 GT Super+ 1GB (NE/9800TXT302)


Product Number: NE/9800TXT302
Manufacturer’s Product Page: Palit Microsystems Ltd.
Price: Click here to compare prices
Warranty: 2 Years




The final card we are going to be looking at is also the only 1GB 9800 GT in this roundup and it takes the form of Palit’s Super+ card. Palit has been known to go out on a limb from time to time and while there are quite a few other manufacturers out there who have introduced 1GB cards, this one was the first to reach retailers. It should be interesting to see how it does against 512MB cards at higher resolutions but we have some doubts about the core’s ability to make use of the full amount of ram. Clock speeds stay at stock values all around so other than the 1GB, this is a bone stock card.

Pricing for the Super+ 1GB is a bit on the high side at around $190 before rebates which puts it into the higher-end of the 9800 GT lineup beyond even the ASUS 9800 GT Ultimate. That is with the 2-year warranty to boot so let’s hope this card can put up some impressive performance figures.


The box for this card is the exact same as that seem on the Sonic model with a red model number sticker being the only noticeable difference. However, there is a marked difference in the accessories since the Super+ comes with the S/PDIF cable and HDMI dongle that were MIA from Palit’s other offering. Tomb Raider Anniversary, a driver CD and an installation booklet are also included.


The dual slot design of the heatsink on the Super+ is quite unique but it has the unfortunate distinction of being painted one of the ugliest colors we have ever seen on a graphics card. While it may look functional for dissipating heat, the shroud you see is made of plastic and is nothing more than a design element rather than a functional piece of engineering. To make matters somewhat worse, most of the heat produced by the core will stay within your case since the fan is not directional and pushes air in every direction through the porous shroud.

Even though it may look overly long with its heatsink, this Palit card stays at the reference design’s 9” length.


The heatsink itself has a pair of large heatpipes which lead to a number of aluminum fins which dissipate the core’s heat while the ram is covered by a black piece of aluminum. This design is functional but we wish that all of the heat would be exhausted through the back of the card instead of only some of it. There is also an S/PDIF connector on the card itself for audio pass-through to the HDMI dongle.


With 1GB of memory, Palit needed to locate the additional ICs on the back of the PCB where they are covered by their own heatsink. Just remember that this piece of aluminum gets very, very hot so if you are planning on removing the card after use, wait a few minutes before handling it.
 
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Test System & Setup

Test System & Setup

System Used

Processor: Intel Core 2 Quad Extreme QX9770 @ 3.852Ghz
Memory: G.Skill 2x 2GB DDR2-1000 @ 1052Mhz DDR
Motherboard: DFI LanParty DK X38 T2R
Disk Drive: Pioneer DVD Writer
Hard Drive: Hitachi Deskstar 320GB SATAII
Fans: 2X Yate Loon 120mm @ 1200RPM
Power Supply: Corsair HX1000W
Monitor: Samsung 305T 30” widescreen LCD
OS: Windows Vista Ultimate x64 SP1


Graphics Cards:

Gigabyte 9800 GT
ASUS 9800 GT Ultimate
Palit 9800 GT Super+
Palit 9800 GT Sonic
EVGA 9800 GT Hybridpower
Sapphire Radeon HD4850 512MB (Single & Crossfire)
Palit Radeon HD4870 512MB (Single & Crossfire)
BFG 9800 GTX
EVGA 8800GT

Drivers:

Nvidia 177.79 WHQL candidate
ATI Catalyst 8.8


Applications Used:

3DMark06 Professional
3DMark Vantage
Enemy Territory: Quake Wars
Devil May Cry 4 Demo
Crysis
Call of Duty 4: Modern Warfare
Prey
World in Conflict


*Notes:

- All games tested have been patched to their latest version

- The OS has had all the latest hotfixes and updates installed

- All scores you see are the averages after 4 benchmark runs

- If the game did not support 2560 x 1600 resolution, the closest resolution to that was used
 

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3DMark 06

3DMark 06


While some may wonder at the use of still including 3DMark06 in the tests it gives us a good idea of the basic limitations of a graphics card. Since the standard test runs at 1280x1024 there will be a fair amount of CPU bottlenecking with higher-end cards and remember that in many cases a higher 3DMark score does not equate better performance. Here we have also included tests with AA and AF enabled



 
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