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GIGABYTE Z170X-UD5 TH Motherboard Review

MAC

Associate Review Editor
Joined
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Messages
1,086
Location
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Feature Testing: Onboard Audio

Feature Testing: Onboard Audio


Since fewer and fewer consumers seem to be buying discrete sound cards, the quality of a motherboard's onboard audio is now more important than ever. We figured that it was worthwhile to take a closer look at just how good the analog signal quality is coming out of the onboard Amp-Up audio subsystem that is implemented on the Z170X-UD5 TH. As mentioned earlier, this model features a proven Realtek ALC1150 codec, Texas Instruments OPA1652 op-amp, and both an EMI cover and PCB-level isolation line.

Since isolated results don't really mean much, but we have also included some numbers from the plethora of motherboards that we have previously reviewed. While the budget GIGABYTE Z170-HD3 motherboard is based on the Realtek ALC887, a lower-end 7.1 channel HD audio codec, all of the other models feature onboard audio solutions that are built around the higher-end Realtek ALC1150 codec, but feature different op-amps, headphone amplifiers, filtering capacitors, secondary components and layouts. The GIGABYTE X99-Gaming G1 WIFI and EVGA X99 Classified are both based on the same Creative Core3D CA0132 quad-core audio processor, but feature vastly different hardware implementations.

We are going to do this using both quantitative and qualitative analysis, since sound quality isn't really something that can be adequately explained with only numbers. To do this we have turned to the RightMark Audio Analyzer, basically the standard application for this type of testing.

Since all the three motherboards support very high quality 24-bit, 192kHz audio playback we selected that as the sample mode option. Basically, what this test does is pipe the audio signal from the front-channel output to the line-in input via a 3.5mm male to 3.5mm male mini-plug cable, and then RightMark Audio Analyzer (RMAA) does the audio analysis. Obviously we disabled all software enhancements since they interfere with the pure technical performance that we are trying to benchmark.


As you can see, the Z170X-UD5 TH posted very strong audio results, and we are happy to report that the sound quality was above reproach. As we have mentioned in the past, at this high level there was no discernible difference in output quality between motherboards. Using our usual mix of mix of Grado SR225i and Koss PortaPro headphones, Westone UM1 IEMs, and Logitech Z-5500 5.1 speakers, the playback was clean, and using the front-panel audio header we could crank the volume up on our Grado's to well past enjoyable sound levels. As always, we aren't experts in this area, but we suspect that most owners will likewise be very happy with this motherboard's onboard audio capabilities.
 
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MAC

Associate Review Editor
Joined
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Messages
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Location
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Feature Testing: M.2 PCI-E 3.0 x4

Feature Testing: M.2 PCI-E 3.0 x4


One of the big advancements of the Skylake LGA1151 platform was the fact that it brought the M.2 connector to the maintream. Not only did it make this new storage connector available at a more reasonable price, but properly implemented too. While most first-gen X99 LGA2011-v3 motherboards had an M.2 connector, many were speed limited or had a caveats list a mile long. Since all Z170 motherboard manufacturers are now boasting of their "full speed" PCI-E 3.0 x4 M.2 connectors with support for NVMe SSDs, we thought it was time to test out those claims. While there are no M.2 SSDs on the market that make full use of this interface's theoretical maximum bandwidth of 32Gbps (4GB/s), we went searching for one that could at least break the 2000MB/s barrier and quickly settled on the Samsung SSD 950 PRO 256GB.

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This next-generation NVMe PCI-E SSD combines Samsung's newest UBX controller with its industry-leading 3D V-NAND and is capable sequential read speeds of up to 2,200MB/second and write speeds of up to 900MB/sec.

One of the ways that we will be evaluating the performance of a motherboard's M.2 interface is by verifying that is capable of matching or exceeding these listed transfer rates. The other is by checking to see whether it performs as well as when we install the SSD 950 PRO onto a ASUS Hyper M.2 x4 expansion card plugged directly into a PCI-E 3.0 x16 slot. Since the M.2 connector can get its PCI-E lanes from the Z170 PCH, or directly from the processor via switches, we want to see if the chosen implementation is causing any performance issues.

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M.2 vs PCI-E

As can see, the performance of the M.2 interface on the Z170X-UD5 TH is excellent. It was well within 1% of the performance of the PCI-E slot, and even consistently outperformed it in a few categories.

While transfer rates are obviously an important metric, we figured that it was also worthwhile to take a peak at instructions per second (IOPS) to ensure that there wasn't any variance there either:

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M.2 vs PCI-E

Once again, the differences are essentially non-existent and well within the margin of error for this benchmark. As a result, we think that it is fair to say that the M.2 interface on the Z170X-UD5 TH has been very well implemented and should ensure that you get optimal performance from any current or future M.2 x4 solid state drives.
 

MAC

Associate Review Editor
Joined
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Messages
1,086
Location
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Auto & Manual Overclocking Results

Auto & Manual Overclocking Results


It wouldn't be an HWC review if we didn't include some overclocking results, so we thoroughly tested this motherboard's capabilities, especially its auto-overclocking functionality. There won't be any ground breaking insights on how to overclock Skylake in this article, but our personal pointers are to increase the vCore up to around 1.40V if you're cooling can handle it, while increasing the VCCIO up to 1.20V, and the System Agent voltage up to 1.25V. If you are trying to achieve the highest possible DDR4 memory speeds, increasing the VCCIO to 1.25V and vSA to 1.35V might be worth trying out. These last two are really only needed if you plan on seriously pushing the Uncore/cache frequency or the memory frequency. On the memory front, we are sticking with 1.40V in order to alleviate any possible bottlenecks and to stay inline with all our previous DDR4 reviews. By the way, if you have an unlocked K-series processor, there's no reason to go crazy increasing the BCLK if you can achieve similar results by just tweaking the various multipliers instead.


Auto Overclocking

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The Z170X-UD5 TH features four types of automatic overclocking, two software based and two BIOS based. Within the EasyTune utility there is an OC preset and the more intelligent and supposedly more capable AutoTuning feature. The OC preset is super simple; you just click on the icon, the system reboots and the overclock is applied. This increases the core clock to 4.4Ghz, which is fairly minimal increase that isn't really worth much additional testing, so we focused on AutoTuning instead. AutoTuning is a "smart" auto-overclocking feature in that it doesn't utilize presets. Instead, AutoTuning slowly increases the system frequencies and does some stress testing at each level until it finds the limit, and then reboots to lock-in the overclock. The whole process takes about 5 to 10 minutes.

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Click on image to enlarge

For some odd reason, on this model, AutoTuning returned with an overclock result of a 4.4Ghz. This is weird since on both the Z170X-Gaming 3 and the Z170-HD3 it managed to hit 4.6Ghz. We have no clue what's causing the discrepancy, unless GIGABYTE have tuned the process to be a little more conservative and apply less voltage. Either way, from a stock 4.0-4.2Ghz to a steady 4.4Ghz in 30 seconds plus the time it takes to reboot it still pretty decent. As usual, AutoTuning failed to recognize our memory kit's XMP profile and as a result kept memory frequency and timings at default levels.

Next let's check out the two BIOS-based automatic overclocking options.

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Click on image to enlarge

Within the BIOS, the first setting that you encounter in the Advanced Frequency Settings menu is Performance Upgrade, which consists of a drop-down menu that contains options ranging from Auto to 100% Upgrade. Naturally, we went straight to the 100% Upgrade option that set a 4.7Ghz CPU frequency and DDR3-2133 memory speeds. This option worked perfectly and became our preferred automatic overclock method on this motherboard. The CPU core voltage topped out at 1.308V when all cores were loaded, but usually loitered around the 1.248V range when a single-core was being used. This is quite reasonable given the core clock. Once again, the memory and cache frequency were left untouched and kept at default levels.

Last but not least, from within the M.I.T section of the BIOS there is an option called "CPU Upgrade" that lists a variety of overclocks based on what CPU model you have installed. We decided to try it out and selected the highest option for a Core i7-6700K, which is 4.60hz. Let's see if it worked:

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Click on image to enlarge

As you can see above, the CPU Upgrade feature delivered on its promise of a 4.60Ghz overclock. The CPU core voltage topped out at a impressively low 1.272V, and peaked at 1.236V during single-threaded workloads. We do once again wish that it had applied some kind of memory or cache overclock.

Manual Overclocking

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Click on image to enlarge

When it came time for some hands on overclocking, we experienced no problems pushing our i7-6700K up to its full potential, which is about 4.85Ghz in the 1.41V range. No fancy tricks were required, we just increasing the CPU multiplier to 48X, gave the BCLK a tiny bump up to 101.25Mhz, and selected the DDR4-3600 memory speed option. We managed to increase the cache/uncore frequency from the stock 4000Mhz to 4250Mhz without having to touch any other voltage settings. Overall, we didn't encounter any overclocking issues on this motherboard, and when we did push things too far in order to find the limits, it recovered just fine.

Since we couldn't max out both the core clock and memory frequency at the same time, we decided to do a separate test to determine the highest stable memory frequency that we could run on this motherboard.

Memory Overclocking

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Click on image to enlarge

We hit the big 4000 mark! No other motherboard aside from the ASUS Maximus VIII Impact - which was purpose-built for memory overclocking - has been able to reach this level. Despite only officially supporting overclocked memory speeds up to DDR4-3800, we managed to apply the XMP profile that is baked into our excellent Corsair DDR4-4000 8GB memory kit, and it worked perfectly. We suspect that the Z170X-UD5 TH could hit even higher, but we have run out of voltage headroom. Specifically, GIGABYTE has limited the VCCSA voltage to a maximum of 1.30V, which is disappointing since we have used between 1.35V to 1.38V on other motherboards in order to maximize our memory overclocks. While we don't recommend running above 1.30V for day-to-day use, we do still wish that they allowed more headroom just for some occasional 'extreme' overclocking fun.
 
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MAC

Associate Review Editor
Joined
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Messages
1,086
Location
Montreal
System Benchmarks

System Benchmarks


In the System and Gaming Benchmarks sections, we reveal the results from a number of benchmarks run with the Core i7-6700K and GIGABYTE Z170X-UD5 TH at default clocks, with two different DDR4 memory speeds, with the two best automatic overclocks, and using own our manual overclock. This will illustrate how much performance can be achieved with this motherboard in stock and overclocked form. For a thorough comparison of the Core i7-6700K versus a number of different CPUs have a look at our "The Intel i7-6700K Review; Skylake Arrives" article.


SuperPi Mod v1.9 WP


When running the SuperPI 32MB benchmark, we are calculating Pi to 32 million digits and timing the process. Obviously more CPU power helps in this intense calculation, but the memory sub-system also plays an important role, as does the operating system. We are running one instance of SuperPi Mod v1.9 WP. This is therefore a single-thread workload.

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wPRIME 2.10


wPrime is a leading multithreaded benchmark for x86 processors that tests your processor performance by calculating square roots with a recursive call of Newton's method for estimating functions, with f(x)=x2-k, where k is the number we're sqrting, until Sgn(f(x)/f'(x)) does not equal that of the previous iteration, starting with an estimation of k/2. It then uses an iterative calling of the estimation method a set amount of times to increase the accuracy of the results. It then confirms that n(k)2=k to ensure the calculation was correct. It repeats this for all numbers from 1 to the requested maximum. This is a highly multi-threaded workload.

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Cinebench R15


Cinebench R15 64-bit
Test1: CPU Image Render
Comparison: Generated Score


The latest benchmark from MAXON, Cinebench R15 makes use of all your system's processing power to render a photorealistic 3D scene using various different algorithms to stress all available processor cores. The test scene contains approximately 2,000 objects containing more than 300,000 total polygons and uses sharp and blurred reflections, area lights and shadows, procedural shaders, antialiasing, and much more. This particular benchmarking can measure systems with up to 64 processor threads. The result is given in points (pts). The higher the number, the faster your processor.

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WinRAR x64


WinRAR x64 5.30 beta 6
Test: Built-in benchmark, processing 1000MB of data.
Comparison: Time to Finish

One of the most popular file archival and compression utilities, WinRAR's built-in benchmark is a great way of measuring a processor's compression and decompression performance. Since it is a memory bandwidth intensive workload it is also useful in evaluating the efficiency of a system's memory subsystem.


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FAHBench


FAHBench 1.2.0
Test: OpenCL on CPU
Comparison: Generated Score

FAHBench is the official Folding@home benchmark that measures the compute performance of CPUs and GPUs. It can test both OpenCL and CUDA code, using either single or double precision, and implicit or explicit modeling. The single precision implicit model most closely relates to current folding performance.


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HEVC Decode Benchmark v1.61


HEVC Decode Benchmark (Cobra) v1.61
Test: Frame rates at various resolution, focusing on the top quality 25Mbps bitrate results.
Comparison: FPS (Frames per Second)

The HEVC Decode Benchmark measures a system's HEVC video decoding performance at various bitrates and resolutions. HEVC, also known as H.265, is the successor to the H.264/MPEG-4 AVC (Advanced Video Coding) standard and it is very computationally intensive if not hardware accelerated. This decode test is done entirely on the CPU.


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LuxMark v3.0


Test: OpenCL CPU Mode benchmark of the LuxBall HDR scene.
Comparison: Generated Score

LuxMark is a OpenCL benchmarking tool that utilizes the LuxRender 3D rendering engine. Since it OpenCL based, this benchmark can be used to test OpenCL rendering performance on both CPUs and GPUs, and it can put a significant load on the system due to its highly parallelized code.


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PCMark 8


PCMark 8 is the latest iteration of Futuremark’s system benchmark franchise. It generates an overall score based upon system performance with all components being stressed in one way or another. The result is posted as a generalized score. In this case, we tested with both the standard Conventional benchmark and the Accelerated benchmark, which automatically chooses the optimal device on which to perform OpenCL acceleration.

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AIDA64 Memory Benchmark

AIDA64 Extreme Edition is a diagnostic and benchmarking software suite for home users that provides a wide range of features to assist in overclocking, hardware error diagnosis, stress testing, and sensor monitoring. It has unique capabilities to assess the performance of the processor, system memory, and disk drives.

The benchmarks used in this review are the memory bandwidth and latency benchmarks. Memory bandwidth benchmarks (Memory Read, Memory Write, Memory Copy) measure the maximum achievable memory data transfer bandwidth. The code behind these benchmark methods are written in Assembly and they are extremely optimized for every popular AMD, Intel and VIA processor core variants by utilizing the appropriate x86/x64, x87, MMX, MMX+, 3DNow!, SSE, SSE2, SSE4.1, AVX, and AVX2 instruction set extension.
The Memory Latency benchmark measures the typical delay when the CPU reads data from system memory. Memory latency time means the penalty measured from the issuing of the read command until the data arrives to the integer registers of the CPU.


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MAC

Associate Review Editor
Joined
Nov 8, 2006
Messages
1,086
Location
Montreal
Gaming Benchmarks

Gaming Benchmarks



Futuremark 3DMark (2013)


3DMark v1.1.0
Graphic Settings: Fire Strike Preset
Rendered Resolution: 1920x1080
Test: Specific Physics Score and Full Run 3DMarks
Comparison: Generated Score


3DMark is the brand new cross-platform benchmark from the gurus over at Futuremark. Designed to test a full range of hardware from smartphones to high-end PCs, it includes three tests for DirectX 9, DirectX 10 and DirectX 11 hardware, and allows users to compare 3DMark scores with other Windows, Android and iOS devices. Most important to us is the new Fire Strike preset, a DirectX 11 showcase that tests tessellation, compute shaders and multi-threading. Like every new 3DMark version, this test is extremely GPU-bound, but it does contain a heavy physics test that can show off the potential of modern multi-core processors.


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Futuremark 3DMark 11


3DMark 11 v1.0.5
Graphic Settings: Extreme Preset
Resolution: 1920x1080
Test: Specific Physics Score and Full Run 3DMarks
Comparison: Generated Score


3DMark 11 is Futuremark's very latest benchmark, designed to tests all of the new features in DirectX 11 including tessellation, compute shaders and multi-threading. At the moment, it is lot more GPU-bound than past versions are now, but it does contain a terrific physics test which really taxes modern multi-core processors.


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Futuremark 3DMark Vantage


3DMark Vantage v1.1.2
Graphic Settings: Performance Preset
Resolution: 1280x1024

Test: Specific CPU Score and Full Run 3DMarks
Comparison: Generated Score

3DMark Vantage is the follow-up to the highly successful 3DMark06. It uses DirectX 10 exclusively so if you are running Windows XP, you can forget about this benchmark. Along with being a very capable graphics card testing application, it also has very heavily multi-threaded CPU tests, such Physics Simulation and Artificial Intelligence (AI), which makes it a good all-around gaming benchmark.


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Valve Particle Simulation Benchmark


Valve Particle Simulation Benchmark
Resolution: 1920x1080
Anti-Aliasing: 4X
Anisotropic Filtering: 8X
Graphic Settings: High

Comparison: Particle Performance Metric

Originally intended to demonstrate new processing effects added to Half Life 2: Episode 2 and future projects, the particle benchmark condenses what can be found throughout HL2:EP2 and combines it all into one small but deadly package. This test does not symbolize the performance scale for just Episode Two exclusively, but also for many other games and applications that utilize multi-core processing and particle effects. This benchmark might be a little old, but is still very highly-threaded and thus will keep scaling nicely as processors gain more and more threads. As you will see the benchmark does not score in FPS but rather in its own "Particle Performance Metric", which is useful for direct CPU comparisons.


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X3: Terran Conflict


X3: Terran Conflict 1.2.0.0
Resolution: 1920x1080
Texture & Shader Quality: High
Antialiasing 4X
Anisotropic Mode: 8X
Glow Enabled

Game Benchmark
Comparison: FPS (Frames per Second)

X3: Terran Conflict (X3TC) is the culmination of the X-series of space trading and combat simulator computer games from German developer Egosoft. With its vast space worlds, intricately detailed ships, and excellent effects, it remains a great test of modern CPU performance. While the X3 Reality engine is single-threaded, it provides us with an interesting look at performance in an old school game environment.


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Final Fantasy XIV: Heavensward Benchmark


Final Fantasy XIV: Heavensward
Resolution: 1920x1080
Texture & Shader Quality: Maximum IQ
DirectX 11
Fullscreen

Game Benchmark
Comparison: Generated Score

Square Enix released this benchmarking tool to rate how your system will perform in Heavensward, the expansion to Final Fantasy XIV: A Realm Reborn. This official benchmark software uses actual maps and playable characters to benchmark gaming performance and assign a score to your PC.


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Grand Theft Auto V


DirectX Version: DirectX 11
Resolution: 1920x1080
FXAA: On
MSAA: X4
NVIDIA TXAA: Off
Anisotropic Filtering: X16
All advanced graphics settings off.

In GTA V, we utilize the handy in-game benchmarking tool. We do ten full runs of the benchmark and average the results of pass 3 since they are the least erratic. We do additional runs if some of the results are clearly anomalous. The Rockstar Advanced Game Engine (RAGE) is ostensibly multi-threaded, but it definitely places the bulk of the CPU load on only one or two threads.


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Middle-earth: Shadow of Mordor


Resolution: 1920x1080
Graphical Quality: Custom
Mesh/Shadow/Texture Filtering/Vegetation Range: Ultra
Lighting/Texture Quality/Ambient Occlusion: High
Depth of Field/Order Independent Transparency/Tesselation: Enabled

With its high resolution textures and several other visual tweaks, Shadow of Mordor’s open world is also one of the most detailed around. This means it puts massive load on graphics cards and should help point towards which GPUs will excel at next generation titles. We do three full runs of the benchmark and average the results.


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MAC

Associate Review Editor
Joined
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Messages
1,086
Location
Montreal
Voltage Regulation / Power Consumption

Voltage Regulation

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Our voltage regulation testing will focus on the various system voltages and the differences encountered between what is selected in the BIOS and what is measured by a digital multi-meter (DMM). Thanks to the eight onboard voltage measurement points we didn't have to go poking & prodding everywhere, since all the voltage read points are located in one convenient spot.

These measurements were taken at stock system speeds and with all settings set to default in the BIOS. We used Prime 95 Blend in order to create a heavy system load. Here are our findings:

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As you can see, the Z170X-UD5 TH has excellent regulation output. What you set in the bios is dead-on exactly what the board put outs whether idling or under full load. There is a normal amount of voltage droopage on CPU Input line under full load, but those who want no vDroop have the settings available to completely eliminate it via the various Load-Line Calibration (LLC) settings. Basically, everything here looks great, and ensures that dialing in the exact right voltage to stabilize an overclock should be a breeze.


Power Consumption

For this section, every energy saving feature was enabled in the BIOS and the Windows power plan was changed from High Performance to Balanced. For our idle test, we let the system idle for 15 minutes and measured the peak wattage through our UPM EM100 power meter. For our CPU load test, we ran Prime 95 In-place large FFTs on all available threads, measuring the peak wattage via the UPM EM100 power meter. For our overall system load test, we ran Prime 95 on all available threads while simultaneously loading the GPU with 3DMark Vantage - Test 6 Perlin Noise.

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If we compare this motherboard to the ASRock Z170 Extreme4+ or the GIGABYTE Z170X-Gaming 3, the idle power consumption numbers are a fair bit lower, while the load figures are a little higher but still very much inline we what would expect from a motherboard with this many added controllers. We aren't using any of the numerous power saving software options that GIGABYTE offers, so there's definitely room for improvement if that's of interest to you. Obviously, once you start overclocking and pumping extra voltage into the processor the power consumption starts climbing, but these numbers are what we would expect given the frequencies and voltages involved. Overall, everything looks good here.
 
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MAC

Associate Review Editor
Joined
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Messages
1,086
Location
Montreal
Conclusion

Conclusion


At Hardware Canucks we like products that are somehow unique, and the GIGABYTE Z170X-UD5 TH certainly qualifies since it was not only world's first Intel Thunderbolt 3 certified motherboard, but it is currently one of the cheapest to offer that next-gen connectivity. At $200 USD / $265 CAD, this model is not inexpensive, but as you have hopefully read, it is quite reasonable for what you are getting.

Looking at the fundamental specs, the Z170X-UD5 TH more than meets our expectations for a well-rounded LGA1151 motherboard. It features an 11-phase CPU power design, three steel-reinforced PCI-E 3.0 x16 slots with support for 2-way SLI or 3-way CrossFireX, three PCI-E 3.0 x1 slots, six SATA 6Gb/s ports or three SATA Express ports, a full-speed M.2 x4 connector, a single Intel-powered gigabit LAN port, and an onboard audio subsystem that achieved great numbers in our testing. We also love the little extras like the debug LED display, onboard power and reset buttons, voltage read points, and the extra PCI-E power connector. Having said of all that, those specs alone aren't why anyone is going to purchase this particular model.

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It is the versatile and ultra-high bandwidth connectivity options that make this motherboard special. The dual USB Type-C ports that support Thunderbolt 3, USB 3.1, and DisplayPort 1.2 are obviously this model's key selling feature, not to undersell the onboard HDMI 2.0 output. Like most of you, we don't have any Thunderbolt accessories lying around, so there's not much we could do to test them out, but the potential is undeniable. With up to 40Gbps and 36W of power available per port, plus the ability to daisy-chain a total of 12 devices, those with Thunderbolt 3 needs will be very well served by this motherboard. While two Type-C ports are nice, we would have still liked to see one USB 3.1 Type-A port on the rear I/O panel, or failing that a simple Type-C to Type-A adapter just to give people a little added flexibility when it comes to what they can connect to this motherboard. Those who don't need USB 3.1 performance will be more than well served by the four USB 3.0 ports, four USB 2.0 ports, and the four internal USB 2.0 and USB 3.0 headers.

When it comes to overclocking, the Z170X-UD5 TH did phenomenally well. The three automatic overclocking features worked great, achieving very good results ranging from 4.40GHz to 4.70GHz. They are all user friendly, extremely simple to use, and provide very sizeable performance gains over default clocks. We did find it a little unusual that the AutoTuning feature achieved less impressive results than usual, but the two other overclocking methods more than make up for the slack. When it came time to go hands on, we were able to max out our Core i7-6700K, which means 4.86Ghz at about 1.41V accompanied by a mild 4.25Ghz cache/uncore frequency. It was a drama-free affair, and when we did push things too far the motherboard had no problems recovering.

While this is all fine and dandy, the star of the show was obviously the memory clocking capabilities. Until today, we have only been able to hit DDR4-4000 on one motherboard, the ASUS Maximus VIII Impact. That tiny Mini-ITX model is basically purpose-built for memory overclocking thanks to its short traces and highly optimized two RAM slot design. DDR4-4000 is a feat that even the flagship ASUS Maximus VIII Extreme couldn't accomplish, so colour us shocked that a mainstream model with no serious overclocking pretensions would be able to reach that milestone. Since we reviewed the Impact back in 2015, this was the first time all year that our Corsair Vengeance LPX DDR4-4000 memory kit was actually able to stretch its legs. Impressive!

Overall, you know your needs better than we do, but there is nothing holding us back from recommending this motherboard. The basic specs are solid, the layout is trouble-free, the little usability extras are great, it overclocks like a champ, and it comes with both Thunderbolt 3 and HDMI 2.0. If either of those two features interest you, there's no reason to look elsewhere.

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