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How stupid is my idea? From 0 to printing my own Case?

CMetaphor

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I've kinda slowed down on this idea for the moment. Motivation to do anything is so difficult, that I'm not sure it's a good idea to spend $300-400 right now for something I'll barely use. Need to get some other things DONE... Somehow. Make space, do more research, then finally get a printer when I'm fully informed about it.

That being said, I really am excited about the possibility to design and print my Own SFF gamer case. I could literally make the unicorn of ideal features I've always wanted, just how i want them. I'm a long ways away from that part obviously, but the possibility has made me 100% certain: I *will* be buying ba 3D printer. It's not longer a question of if, it's when.

I'm not sure if anyone commented yet, but is $450-500 fair for an Ended 5 (not pro or plus) that comes with some upgrades already installed over the standard Ender 5? I need to check exactly which upgrades, but considering *on sale* the Ender 5 is $460 plus tax at Amazon right now, I think it might still be worth it. Any upgrades are just icing savings.

Brb, checking which upgrades it had.

Edit: it comes with a "feed regulator", which... Isn't that a sensor on the extruder? Which afaik doesn't normally have one. Not certain the benefits of having one.
It also has a replacement nozzle, which is one I'd do anyways, free filaments, a home made enclosure for heat and a couple of small things.

So, worth about $500? I think so, but I'm the exact opposite of an expert.

I'm also thinking about what other upgrades too, suggestions for a regular Ender 5?
 
Last edited:

lcdguy

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provided that the printer is mechanically sound and in good shape (ie: nothing needs replacement off the bat such as belts, v wheels, bearings, etc) it's probably a good price. I would also setup the printer in a well ventilated room if possible to help with fumes and ufp's (pla and pet-g's are pretty safe, but abs/asa/nylon/pc can give off some nasty by products).

I would also try out design software first to see if it's something you are going to enjoy or frustrate you before diving down the 3d printing rabbit hole :)
 

Izerous

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Yeah i think playing around with the 3d modeling software first is a great idea. A lot of the softrware is either free or awfully cheap. And if you can't get past the design stage then your not out the cost of a printer to just sit there.

From past experience with some of the 3d modeling software I do recomend sketching it all out on paper first even if it is really rough drawings. This will help you get an idea of what you want on the screen then you can learn how to make the shapes you drew instead of dealign with the learning curve of the software right out the gate.
 

CMetaphor

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@Izerous
Fair bit of advice, but that's exactly what I've been doing for years. Doodling case designs, mods, adapters, etc for years and year on paper and whiteboard or even just in my head. I can see very well the kinds of parts and pieces I want to print, so it really just is the software learning curve to attack next.

I'm just trying to figure out Which software to out my time (and admittedly limited motivation) into. If I can find one that works intuitively and get printing relatively easily afterwards, I really do think it will Give me more motivation. Seeing the tangible results is very important to me, like a positive reinforcement to help me motivate even more.
 

CMetaphor

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You might also want to give Blender a shot. Its free and open sourced. Its come a looooong way since it was first available .
Lots and lots of tutorials for beginners out there..

The problem is too many software choices and too many opinions for them. I've got a list of 4-5 options now and have no idea which to choose. I was leaning towards Fusion 360 until the limitations thing was announced, now I'm not sure. Then I was leaning towards Solid Edge since it seems the most detailed... But also possibly the most complicated and hardest to learn. Now adding Blender... It's just a sea of software choices and I don't know what to try.
 

sswilson

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The problem is too many software choices and too many opinions for them. I've got a list of 4-5 options now and have no idea which to choose. I was leaning towards Fusion 360 until the limitations thing was announced, now I'm not sure. Then I was leaning towards Solid Edge since it seems the most detailed... But also possibly the most complicated and hardest to learn. Now adding Blender... It's just a sea of software choices and I don't know what to try.

I suspect it's similar to the idea of photoshop's workflow vs other available photo imaging programs. There's probably pros/cons to each program, but unless you're shooting for "industry standard" so that you can market your skills to potential employers it's probably more a matter of learning one platform and sticking with it.
 

danmitch1

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Dec 15, 2007
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Think of the software as a tool. If you are learning carpentry, do you invest in the best set of tools before even knowing how to hammer a nail? What if you hate hammering nails after your first week? You just waisted your money. Get a set of free tools, see if you actually like doing it.
Blender is free, was always and will always be. It has a massive community support and these skills can be transferable to other software.
 

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