What's new
  • Please do not post any links until you have 3 posts as they will automatically be rejected to prevent SPAM. Many words are also blocked due to being used in SPAM Messages. Thanks!

Installing a 15a breaker to outlet

danmitch1

Well-known member
Joined
Dec 15, 2007
Messages
673
So as the title states, id like to add an outlet in one of my rooms that has a dedicated 15a breaker.
Im pretty sure I have an idea how to get it done myself. Ill need the 14gauge wire, the 15a breaker and an outlet. Shut the main power, be careful taking the cover off the breaker panel. Be very careful around the live main power inlet.
I have a crawl space, so really its just a matter of running the wire, drilling some holes plugging in the breaker , wiring everything and bobs your uncle.. right?

Is there something an electrician would do different?

If i did all the work minus the final wiring and called an electrician, what is an average rate for basically doing the honors of wiring everything ? Im guessing that would be labor charge, most likely an hour minimum...

Opinions? Suggestions?

Thanks guys!
 

JD

Moderator
Staff member
Joined
Jul 16, 2007
Messages
9,104
Location
Toronto, ON
Technically you should pull a ESA permit and have them inspect it once complete. Looking at their site, I think it's $56 for 1-10 outlets, but it seems like it gets rounded up to $79 to cover the inspection. Once they inspect, they'll tag/seal your panel so future owners know everything was done to code.

An electrician would include those costs within their quote, assuming they are certified. I would imagine you running the wire yourself wouldn't save much cost-wise as I'm sure they'd want to check it anyways. No harm in asking a few for estimates to see though.
 

danmitch1

Well-known member
Joined
Dec 15, 2007
Messages
673
Oh really, for some reason I was expecting much more , like 200$ or something. Do you think i should trust them to buy the hardware or will i be better off buying it and just have them do the installation?
Thanks for the input.
 

JD

Moderator
Staff member
Joined
Jul 16, 2007
Messages
9,104
Location
Toronto, ON
Those numbers were just for the permit/inspection, actual electrician to do the work is going to be a much more than that. Not really sure on costs and I would imagine they vary by location anyhow.

An electrician would probably get better pricing on breakers, wire, etc. They'd already have all the necessary tools too. If you plan to do more electrical work in the future though, then it might be worthwhile to invest in drill bits, wire strippers, push sticks, fish tape, etc.

Whenever I do DIY stuff, a fair bit of money is spent on new tools to achieve it...which is part of the fun ;) At the same time though, when I look back, I realize it took me significantly longer to do something that a pro could have done in half the time or less.
 

KaptCrunch

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 23, 2008
Messages
4,077
Location
Ontario
Technically you should pull a ESA permit and have them inspect it once complete. Looking at their site, I think it's $56 for 1-10 outlets, but it seems like it gets rounded up to $79 to cover the inspection. Once they inspect, they'll tag/seal your panel so future owners know everything was done to code.

An electrician would include those costs within their quote, assuming they are certified.
Yes listen to the wise JD

For insurance purpose you need certifiation, if not there no insurance coverage.
Another note total of breakers cannot exceed main breaker of panel.

If your panel is sub standard amperage, you need a disconnect certification from hydro to conplete higher service amperage with thicker main line to home and new panel to match service
 

Herne

Well-known member
Joined
Jun 18, 2010
Messages
131
If you are doing the proper way there might be more. At least in Ontario, code requires Arc fault (AFCI) on new runs. For my basement that meant instead of a $20 15a breaker dropped into main, it was a couple of $90 AFCI breakers into a new pony panel because there is no approved Federal ones.
 

Wicked15

Well-known member
Joined
Jan 14, 2012
Messages
108
Location
Nova Scotia
Sorry for my ignorance - but where are you located (This is Key) Depending where you live you may not need a permit or to get it inspected as long as you own the property.

If there is another out-out near by I would have just ran power from that plug back and over to the new plug you want to install rather than messing with the panel directly. Unless you are running some serious equipment you shouldn't have an issue.
 
Last edited:

Izerous

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 7, 2019
Messages
276
Location
Edmonton
My desktop overclocked used to overdraw the biggest 15A UPS I could find setting off alarms etc. I had to move to a 20A UPS / Circuit or reduce the overclocks so I think I kinda get where you are going with this. Keep in mind you also supposed to staple the wire every X distance when running up and down studs, holes through floor joists etc are sufficient in that case. Also need a staple near the outlet if you can get one in place with a loop of small excess to act as a repair mans loop. Also I'm always told NEVER use the push in part of the outlet and always use the screw terminals. Wrap the wire around the screw the same direction as the screw turns to tighten so it pulls the wire into the screw instead of pushing it out.

If it is in a bedroom I recall it is supposed to be an arc fault breaker (different from GFI or standard breaker) but I don't know it if is required or simply best practice.
 

Herne

Well-known member
Joined
Jun 18, 2010
Messages
131
My desktop overclocked used to overdraw the biggest 15A UPS I could find setting off alarms etc. I had to move to a 20A UPS / Circuit or reduce the overclocks so I think I kinda get where you are going with this. Keep in mind you also supposed to staple the wire every X distance when running up and down studs, holes through floor joists etc are sufficient in that case. Also need a staple near the outlet if you can get one in place with a loop of small excess to act as a repair mans loop. Also I'm always told NEVER use the push in part of the outlet and always use the screw terminals. Wrap the wire around the screw the same direction as the screw turns to tighten so it pulls the wire into the screw instead of pushing it out.

If it is in a bedroom I recall it is supposed to be an arc fault breaker (different from GFI or standard breaker) but I don't know it if is required or simply best practice.
Not just bedrooms:
Understanding the 2015 Canadian Electrical Code provisions

In simplified terms, arc-fault circuit protection is required in 125Vac, 15A and 20A circuits supplying receptacles throughout the home with the exception of those outlined in the 2015 CE Code.
 

Sagath

Moderator
Staff member
Joined
Feb 7, 2009
Messages
4,016
Location
Edmonton, AB
Not just bedrooms:
Understanding the 2015 Canadian Electrical Code provisions

In simplified terms, arc-fault circuit protection is required in 125Vac, 15A and 20A circuits supplying receptacles throughout the home with the exception of those outlined in the 2015 CE Code.
Herne is correct, any new runs anywhere that arnt GFCI (wet areas) protected must have snake-oil errr, I mean, Arc Fault protection in place.
 

Latest posts

Twitter

Top