What's new
  • Please do not post any links until you have 3 posts as they will automatically be rejected to prevent SPAM. Many words are also blocked due to being used in SPAM Messages. Thanks!

Intel Devil's Canyon i7-4790K Performance Review

SKYMTL

HardwareCanuck Review Editor
Staff member
Joined
Feb 26, 2007
Messages
13,421
Location
Montreal
Gaming Benchmarks (1440P, pg.2)

Gaming Benchmarks (pg.2)





These next benchmarks continue the trend of nearly equal performance but we can see how a game like Hitman: Absolution, which is slightly more multi-core optimized is able to allow the i7-4790K to pull ahead.
 
Last edited:

SKYMTL

HardwareCanuck Review Editor
Staff member
Joined
Feb 26, 2007
Messages
13,421
Location
Montreal
Gaming Benchmarks (1440P, pg.3)

Gaming Benchmarks




Once again we see very little differentiation here but that doesn't necessarily carry over into every instance. If your system isn't GPU limited, some judicious overclocking could allow it to perform at a drastically faster pace in games.
 
Last edited:

SKYMTL

HardwareCanuck Review Editor
Staff member
Joined
Feb 26, 2007
Messages
13,421
Location
Montreal
System Power Consumption

System Power Consumption


Our power consumption numbers are broken down into two categories: one which simply stresses all of the CPU cores with WPrime and another which puts a high amount of load on both the CPU cores and the IGP. The latter will only be included if a given processor includes a dedicated internal graphics sub-processor.

For the CPU power consumption test, we use the standard testing system (with an NVIDIA GTX 670 installed) and wait until the system and discrete GPU are at idle speeds in order to log the idle power consumption. After this, WPrime 1024M is looped for 15 minutes while the power consumption is logged with a calibrated power meter to determine the peak watts.

Please note that after extensive testing, we have found that simply plugging in a power meter to a wall outlet or UPS will NOT give you accurate power consumption numbers due to slight changes in the input voltage. Thus we use a Tripp-Lite 1800W line conditioner between the 120V outlet and the power meter.



According to Intel the i7-4790K’s TDP has only increased by about 4W over its predecessor. However, the TDP metric doesn’t necessarily translate into power consumption since it is simply a convenient indicator for system builders so their cooling solutions can be planned accordingly.

With that being said, the 4790K does tend to consume more power than its predecessor but not by all that much. It’s actually quite efficient considering the performance being brought to the table. When overclocked, everything gets turned to eleven and power consumption trails the i7-4960X by about 13W.
 

SKYMTL

HardwareCanuck Review Editor
Staff member
Joined
Feb 26, 2007
Messages
13,421
Location
Montreal
Conclusion

Conclusion


Intel’s Devil’s Canyon may be an interim revision to the Haswell architecture but it has been designed specifically for enthusiasts. When the original Haswell processors made their way into the sales channels, there were plenty of complaints of high temperatures and limited overclocking headroom due to thermal throttling. Intel listened to those concerns and has launched a pair of new K-series processors which are supposed to address those concerns. For the most part, that’s exactly what the i7-4970K does.

Out of the box, the i7-4790K is fast. Really, really fast. It can either match or beat an i7-4960X in gaming while only trailing by a hair in many other tasks, though don’t expect it to emerge triumphant in heavily threaded environments where IVB-E tends to shine. There’s also a significant lead against the i7-4770K though that does deteriorate to almost nothing when playing games at higher resolutions. Intel needs to be commended since this has all been accomplished without a massive TDP and power consumption premium.

For many enthusiasts, out-of-box performance doesn’t really matter. If they were looking for a CPU to leave at stock frequencies non-K series processors are available at much lower price points. This means overclocking plays a huge role in these higher end chips’ appeal but despite expectations, the overclocking goal posts haven’t moved by any perceptible amount with Devil’s Canyon. Our sample hit 4.719GHz on all cores on high end air cooling with full 24/7 stability in both 3D and general task-related applications. That’s about 200MHz higher than our quick and dirty i7-4770K overclock during that processor’s launch review but perfectly in line with what most overclockers have achieved with comparable first generation Haswell CPUs.

Intel’s very public claims of 5GHz on air and 4.6GHz on fanless cooling are ringing hollow for those of us without access to cherry-picked chips or extreme methods of cooling. After speaking to numerous motherboard vendors who have tested dozens of samples, we’re told that less than 5% of retail i7-4790K’s will hit above 4.9GHz on air. We have no doubt some will be able to hit 5GHz with Devil’s Canyon but the vast majority of these processors likely won’t get any better results than their predecessors did.

When faced with the prospect of either jumping on the Haswell bandwagon now, in the twilight months of the architecture’s life or waiting until Broadwell launches sometime in the future, gamers will be faced with a daunting decision. For those who absolutely need to upgrade right now, it’s hard to argue against the potent combination of Devil’s Canyon and a Z97 motherboard. A system based around those two key components will be able to remain competitive for years to come while still retaining an upgrade path to Broadwell should the opportunity present itself. However, other than slightly better core temperatures, there really isn’t much of a case for upgrading to an i7-4790K from a Haswell-based system. If you have an i7-4770K that’s capable of 4.8GHz or more on air, hang onto it.

This review ended up being an emotional rollercoaster mixed with wonderment alongside a smattering of disappointment. From a value perspective, the i7-4790K is an absolute triumph though. It doesn’t cost a penny more than the lower-performance processor it replaces and yet it still manages to match strides with significantly more expensive Ivy Bridge-E CPUs. Overclocking headroom is still largely based on your chances with the silicon lottery but with the i7-4790K, Intel has launched one hell of a processor.
 
Last edited:

Twitter

Top