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Migrating from one windows 10 machine to another

GrinderCAN

Active member
Joined
Jan 14, 2016
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27
Hey all. I have a daily driver computer, and another faster machine. I'm thinking of adopting the faster one as my main machine and moving all apps/data/the kitchen sink to it.

Both machines have windows 10 home with a digital entitlement. So I don't want or need to move the windows license itself, since that is tied to the hardware on each machine.

I'm also lazy :D Driver issues aside, can I clone the disk from one to another and still have windows activated no problem? As I said, the windows license should stay with each machine, but I'm not sure exactly what happens when windows wakes up in a different environment. I will then do a clean install on the other machine, which I know from experience will go fine due to the digital license being tied to the hardware signature of the machine.

Has anyone tried this?

Cheers,

G
 

Caldezar

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Aug 21, 2008
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Edmonton Area
You could clone the old computer drive on to the new one, then update the Win 10 key before you bring it online. (Provided the keys are for the same versions of Windows 10. Different OEM licenses sometimes don't play well with other keys.) From there, it would pick up the correct key on the new machine once you connect it online.

However, depending on what the chipset/hardware is on the old and new computers, it may end up being a LOT easier to simply install the required software on the new PC and then transfer the files via USB drive or over the network.
 

sswilson

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From personal experience you're probably better off copying any transferable data and doing a fresh install.

I tried to swap an SSD from an i5 e6420 to an i7 e6420 thinking that all I'd have to do would be to change the auth code. Never was able to get windows to authenticate the new code so ended up doing a fresh install.
 

GrinderCAN

Active member
Joined
Jan 14, 2016
Messages
27
Hey guys,

Thanks for the replies. I don't think it would be necessary to input a new key. I'm talking about skipping the code completely and simply relying on the signature of the digital entitlement for (re)activation. I've done that before with a clean install to a machine that I had already upgraded from 7 to 10, and didn't have to use the key. Microsoft's activation database recognised the hardware config, and no key was necessary for activation. But that was a clean install.

However you are both likely correct that I would be better off transferring/reinstalling stuff (fresh install on the new box is already done) as the hardware is quite different. Albeit I once got an OS from a 3770k to work on an AMD FX box lol.

Thanks again for your input.
 

JD

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Toronto, ON
If you run: "slmgr /rearm" from an Admin CMD prompt, and then shutdown, it may activate fine when you move the drive over and power up. No promises though. That would reset the activation at least...
 

sswilson

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If you run: "slmgr /rearm" from an Admin CMD prompt, and then shutdown, it may activate fine when you move the drive over and power up. No promises though. That would reset the activation at least...
I didn't try that command JD, but there was some form of activation troubleshooter that "said" it accepted the new key and that windows was activated, but that didn't stick on the next boot. Played with it over the course of a day and then ultimately just did a fresh install which accepted the key I'd been trying to use without issue.
 

JD

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I didn't try that command JD, but there was some form of activation troubleshooter that "said" it accepted the new key and that windows was activated, but that didn't stick on the next boot. Played with it over the course of a day and then ultimately just did a fresh install which accepted the key I'd been trying to use without issue.
Yeah... Windows Activation can go horribly wrong too. Yours might of been one of those cases. We run into this with some of our remote machines at work.

The only other trick I can offer is running slmgr /ipk xxxx-xxxx-xxxx-xxxx-xxxx, using the default keys (Generic key to install Windows 10 RTM - Winaero), or even putting the default key into the activation window itself that you pull up from Settings.

Technically any machine that was activated as part of the upgrade is using those default keys. If you run "slmgr /dlv" you should see the same ending 4 characters.
 

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