What's new
  • Please do not post any links until you have 3 posts as they will automatically be rejected to prevent SPAM. Many words are also blocked due to being used in SPAM Messages. Thanks!

Plumbing Advice Needed

danmitch1

Well-known member
Joined
Dec 15, 2007
Messages
1,349
An emergency floor drain wouldn't help much if it's tied to the same mains. If anything it would make the problem worse as it then becomes the lowest fixture. If you have a crawl space you can always see if there is a backwater valve installed. I'd be adding one if there isn't.
If I installed a drain, it would go directly down to the craw space which has a dirt floor not connected to any actual plumbing (y). Ill eventually head down in the craw space, after the heatwave though... we are seeing temperatures up at 43' with humidex the passed days...😓🔆
 

clshades

Well-known member
Joined
May 18, 2011
Messages
3,146
Location
Calgary
If I installed a drain, it would go directly down to the craw space which has a dirt floor not connected to any actual plumbing (y). Ill eventually head down in the craw space, after the heatwave though... we are seeing temperatures up at 43' with humidex the passed days...😓🔆
I would not recommend that.
 

JD

Moderator
Staff member
Joined
Jul 16, 2007
Messages
9,819
Location
Toronto, ON
I think all you'd be doing is causing another problem. Dumping water into a crawl space, just because it has a dirt floor, doesn't mean its going to drain or dry out properly. You'd probably cause structural damage to the building as a whole by washing away the footings/foundation.

I'm pretty sure they make toilets with "overflow protection", much like your sink, tub, etc. That might help relieve some of your concerns, assuming its just air. At least if the water level in the bowl got too high, it should hopefully be able to drain out.
 

clshades

Well-known member
Joined
May 18, 2011
Messages
3,146
Location
Calgary
If on the off chance the toilet did overflow and go down your drain, you'd have another serious problem to deal with. $$$$$.

Drains need to be tied to pipes, but in your case you'd create an even lower flood point. Or if the toilet over filled the drain wouldn't work anyway.

Best bet is to see if the main line leaving the property has a working back water valve. I'd be calling a plumber to check it and take it off the rent.

At the very least, it's there, plumber charges an hour and the rent deduction costs very little. If it's not there he can make a written estimate to add one.
 

danmitch1

Well-known member
Joined
Dec 15, 2007
Messages
1,349
Didn't think of that! See, thats why I come here, real smart bunch of folks!
Should that anti back flow valve also be stopping air though?
 

clshades

Well-known member
Joined
May 18, 2011
Messages
3,146
Location
Calgary
Didn't think of that! See, thats why I come here, real smart bunch of folks!
Should that anti back flow valve also be stopping air though?
There's two types of back water valves. One that's normally open and one that's normally closed. In western Canada we are only allowed normally open.

Normally open - closes when water tries to go backwards into the house. Best one. The reason this one is better is if the drains need to be snaked the auger bit won't get stuck on the flapper. Also, this allows the sewer gas from the street to escape through the top of your house and protects the city mains from building methane gas. Google Chinese sewer explosions.

Normally closed -opens when water and sewage leaves the house. Worst one. Auger bit can get stuck and you'll pay dearly to have it unstuck. Doesn't allow city sewer gases to vent through house hold venting system.

Air isn't a problem with either one as there's always a vent to the roof from the main drainage system -National plumbing code.

Best way to describe a vent in layman's terms is simple. If you've ever played with a straw in liquid, hold your thumb over the straw after its full of liquid, the liquid stays in the straw. Lift your thumb and it flows out.

In any case. Most sewer systems in bigger cities are not tied to the storm drains. Instead, the storm drains have their own drainage system that goes to a body of water. There's some debate about this due to oils and other things getting into river systems and lakes, however, sewerage plants have a tough time dealing with huge storms and the result is dumping untreated sewage into the lakes and rivers anyway because they can't process it fast enough.

If you look at manhole covers and there's a fish stamped on it, or a painted fish near the drain or cover you know this goes to a river, creek, or lake. Meaning, don't dump or throw garbage in them.
 
Last edited:

danmitch1

Well-known member
Joined
Dec 15, 2007
Messages
1,349
There's two types of back water valves. One that's normally open and one that's normally closed. In western Canada we are only allowed normally open.

Normally open - closes when water tries to go backwards into the house. Best one. The reason this one is better is if the drains need to be snaked the auger bit won't get stuck on the flapper. Also, this allows the sewer gas from the street to escape through the top of your house and protects the city mains from building methane gas. Google Chinese sewer explosions.

Normally closed -opens when water and sewage leaves the house. Worst one. Auger bit can get stuck and you'll pay dearly to have it unstuck. Doesn't allow city sewer gases to vent through house hold venting system.

Air isn't a problem with either one as there's always a vent to the roof from the main drainage system -National plumbing code.

Best way to describe a vent in layman's terms is simple. If you've ever played with a straw in liquid, hold your thumb over the straw after its full of liquid, the liquid stays in the straw. Lift your thumb and it flows out.

In any case. Most sewer systems in bigger cities are not tied to the storm drains. Instead, the storm drains have their own drainage system that goes to a body of water. There's some debate about this due to oils and other things getting into river systems and lakes, however, sewerage plants have a tough time dealing with huge storms and the result is dumping untreated sewage into the lakes and rivers anyway because they can't process it fast enough.

If you look at manhole covers and there's a fish stamped on it, or a painted fish near the drain or cover you know this goes to a river, creek, or lake. Meaning, don't dump or throw garbage in them.
Right, that makes sense. I know for a fact that our city street drains go to the treatment plant. But what I was wondering is, the air that I had bubbling up, is that indicative of the valve failing, If there is indeed one installed that is? To me, if its not air proof its not water proof either no?
 

clshades

Well-known member
Joined
May 18, 2011
Messages
3,146
Location
Calgary
Right, that makes sense. I know for a fact that our city street drains go to the treatment plant. But what I was wondering is, the air that I had bubbling up, is that indicative of the valve failing, If there is indeed one installed that is? To me, if its not air proof its not water proof either no?
Hard to say for certain. I'd guess the pipes were full and we're having a hard time keeping up. I doubt you see that on a regular basis.
 
Top