What's new
  • Please do not post any links until you have 3 posts as they will automatically be rejected to prevent SPAM. Many words are also blocked due to being used in SPAM Messages. Thanks!

PNY CS1311 & XLR8 CS2211 SSDs Review

AkG

Well-known member
Joined
Oct 24, 2007
Messages
5,270
Partial and Full Drive Performance

Partial and Full Drive Performance


<i>While it is important to know how a drive will perform under optimal conditions, more realistic scenarios are just as important. Knowing if a solid state drive will behave differently when partially or even nearly full than when it is empty is very important information to know. To quickly and accurately show this crucial information we have first filled the drive to 50% capacity and re-tested using both synthetic and real world tests. After the completion of this we then re-test at 75% and 90% of full capacity. </i>

Synthetic Test Results

<i>For our synthetic testing we have opted for our standard PCMark 7 test.</i>

<div align="center">
<img src="http://images.hardwarecanucks.com/image/akg/Storage/PNY_CS2211/data_pcm.jpg" border="0" alt="" /></div>

Real World Results
<i>For a real world application we have opted for a modified version of our standard Windows 7 Start Up test. Unlike our standard Windows 7 image this image is based on a working system that has been upgraded numerous times of the past few years and represents an even more realistic real world test.</i>

<div align="center"><img src="http://images.hardwarecanucks.com/image/akg/Storage/PNY_CS2211/data_boot.jpg" border="0" alt="" /></div>

All in all, this test does not tell us anything we didn’t already know. Basically the new Phison controller – even when paired with sub optimal NAND – is a very good option. Both showed downright amazing performance retention numbers as they filled up with data.
 
Last edited by a moderator:

AkG

Well-known member
Joined
Oct 24, 2007
Messages
5,270
Conclusion; Two Hidden SSD Gems?

Conclusion; Two Hidden SSD Gems?


For the past couple of years the SSD industry has been in a period of contraction. This may sound counterintuitive as this category’s sales have been booming to the point where even Seagate and Western Digital have jumped onto the SSD train. Unfortunately, the majority of these sales have coalesced around just a handful of companies.

Call them tier 1, call them NAND manufacturer-back companies, call them Intel/Micron/Samsung/OCZ/Sandisk. At the end of the day the label does not matter; rather their near strangle hold on the market does. Recently it has actually become tough to find an exciting drive series that doesn’t come from the ‘Big 5’. This is just as true in the performance arena as it is in the mainstream.

This situation is why the new Phison-based PNY drives are actually rather refreshing: they may not be the absolute best in any one category but they will certainly grab attention for a number of reasons. In many ways PNY’s storage division strongly reminds us of the pre-Toshiba OCZ. They are hungrily going after very specific market niches with drives designed with laser like focus, and are offering some pretty darn good deals to woo potential buyers away from the usual suspects.


PNY CS1311


For anyone interested in moving away from a traditional high capacity yet slow HDD, but not really interested in spending a whole lot of money on their first SSD, the PNY CS1311 would certainly be a safe investment. Its combination of frugally priced TLC NAND with the very capable Phison 3110 controller may not wow mainstream consumers with its performance abilities, this drive offers throughput numbers that are as high or even higher than most alternatives in its price range. In fact many competitors rely upon four channel controller designs and not eight like the PS31110 based CS1311 offers.

While the PS3110 may not be a powerhouse compared to Intel, Samsung, or OCZ’s latest and greatest, what does offer is a relatively potent punch at a very frugal price. It accomplishes this while also including some of the best performance retention numbers we’ve seen from an affordable SSD and that’s an important metric since no one keeps their drive in a “fresh” state for long.

Further helping this model to stand out is the fact that unlike most manufactures - such as Crucial and their BX200 - PNY actually pays more than lip service to the needs of the international consumer. So much so that they have opened several RMA centers (including one in Canada) to help make things easier if things do go wrong. This one not-so-obvious feature’s impact is something that cannot be overlooked when making a decision on what model to purchase.

This combination of good performance, great warranty service, and an aggressive price means that the PNY CS1311 deserves a very close second look for budget constrained consumers, and we have very little problem suggesting it for this specific group of users.


PNY XLR CS2211


Even though the CS1311 did impress us, of the two drive series tested today the XLR8 CS2211 is the more enticing of the two. As part of PNY’s premier ‘XLR8’ line of devices it does have a higher set of standards to meet, and meet it them it does. Once again it may use the exact same Phison PS31110 controller but by changing out the slower TLC NAND for 15nm Toshiba Toggle Mode NAND, this drive is noticeably faster and arguably a better “value” if you have a few more bucks to spend.

With an asking price of $154, PNY are obviously targeting the Crucial MX200 and its ilk. This is certainly a lofty goal as the MX200 has been a fan favorite since its release. On first glance comparing this XLR8 model to Crucial’s competitor is a non-starter since the CS2211’s results aren’t as clear-cut as the the CS1311 vs BX200 comparison. It competes well but falls slightly behind in several key tests. However, the reality is not as black and white as the various performance charts would lead one to believe.

While the Crucial MX200 is still the Juggernaut it was when it first took the mainstream marketplace by storm, the fact remains that PNY XLR8 CS2211’s lower asking price, better warranty, and above all else a hassle free RMA experience do make an extremely persuasive argument in its favor. This may be one of the best-kept secrets in the SSD market right now. So much so that it really will come down to what a potential buyer values most: a slight performance edge and brand-name recognition versus a potentially higher value quotient, ease of RMA and a longer warranty. For this reason, the CS2211 deserves to be on almost everyone’s short list. Doing otherwise could mean overlooking a potentially excellent fit and a surprisingly capable SSD series.

DGV.gif
 
Last edited by a moderator:
Top