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PoE switch type for IP cameras?

MorePower

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I'm going to be installing 5 cameras around my home to use with the Synology Surveillance Station but I'm not sure what type of PoE switch to get. From the attachment this is how I would like it set up. I have everything in that image connected except the PoE switch and cameras. PC2 is currently connected (wired) to the Wifi router. Would a regular PoE switch work for the IP cameras without having bandwidth issues or do I need a managed PoE switch?

If I do need a managed switch I was looking into the Netgear GS110TPP. Any other recommendations?
 

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JD

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You'd only need a managed switch if you are looking to create VLANs. Otherwise you might as well save about $100 going with an unmanaged version (GS108PP) instead, assuming 8 ports is sufficient.

If all your connections terminate in the same spot though, you might consider going with a 16 port switch to consolidate as well. Local traffic would then remain within the switch without having to pass through the router.

I would just make sure the power output of whatever switch you buy is sufficient to handle the power requirements of your cameras. The ~60W models may not be enough.
 

Skippman

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We need to know a couple things to give you a proper recommendation. Are these switches and the router co-located in the same place? Meaning, are they on the same shelf, in the same closet, etc?

If the answer to that is yes, you may want to reconsider how you have your network set up. I would recommend replacing the 4 port switch with a larger 16 port switch with PPPoE as JD recommended. This puts all of your hard wired data traffic on one backplane and removes the router from the equation for everything but Internet traffic. Most consumer grade routers do have GigE ports on them but lack the backplane to support more than 1-2 gig per second sustained throughput. That means if you were using all 4 ports at the same time that 1-2 gigs is divided between them. A proper switch should have enough backplane throughput to support a 100% load.

As far as recommendations, I agree with JD that unless you're planning on using VLAN's the fully managed switch isn't really necessary. I would recommend stepping up to Netgears Smart Managed Plus line though just for the QoS functionality alone.

Ok, three recommendations.

1.) If you can co-locate all your network gear, get a 16 port Smart Managed Plus switch with enough PoE capability to handle all your cameras and consolidate all your Ethernet to one switch.

2.) If you cannot co-locate all your equipment can you move PC2 to your 4 port switch and use the new switch solely for the cameras? This would eliminate the need for QoS and you could use the switch you've picked out.

3.) If you cannot move PC2 to the 4 port switch, get a Smart Managed Plus 8 port switch with enough PoE capability for your cameras and wire it as you've drawn. This will give you the QoS to keep the camera video traffic from interfering with your PC traffic and allow you to create a VLAN to isolate the cameras should you ever decide to do that for recording purposes at your NAS.
 

MorePower

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The modem is in the same room as PC1 and connected to a wall jack. The router and PoE switch will be in different locations.

The PoE switch will be in the basement and wired to the NAS. This will be the best as all the network cables for the cameras will go up in the wall space (used for pluming and vents) into the attic. If I do have the NAS wired directly to the PoE switch does it also need to be on a VLAN?
I do have the option of leaving the NAS in the PC1 room and connected to the router as in the diagram.

My router, HTPC, A/V receiver and the 4 port switch is in the family room in a TV media cabinet. PC2 is also in the family room on the other side of the room from the media cabinet and wired into a wall jack.

So I guess a managed switch would be best for the IP cameras and (NAS?). The cameras and (NAS?) would be on a VLAN and PC2 configured with just a regular connection to the PoE switch.
 

Skippman

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The modem is in the same room as PC1 and connected to a wall jack. The router and PoE switch will be in different locations.

The PoE switch will be in the basement and wired to the NAS. This will be the best as all the network cables for the cameras will go up in the wall space (used for pluming and vents) into the attic. If I do have the NAS wired directly to the PoE switch does it also need to be on a VLAN?
I do have the option of leaving the NAS in the PC1 room and connected to the router as in the diagram.

My router, HTPC, A/V receiver and the 4 port switch is in the family room in a TV media cabinet. PC2 is also in the family room on the other side of the room from the media cabinet and wired into a wall jack.

So I guess a managed switch would be best for the IP cameras and (NAS?). The cameras and (NAS?) would be on a VLAN and PC2 configured with just a regular connection to the PoE switch.
Thanks for the info, that gives me a much clearer picture of what we're talking about. I ran into a similar situation when I lived in a town house. Lets clear up something that I think is confusing you (I could be wrong). A VLAN is basically a bunch of ports grouped into it's own pool. Network engineers use them to subdivide large switches and isolate traffic from each other. It's more a security measure now than anything.

Example: You have an 8 port switch. You assign ports 1-4 to VLAN 10 and ports 5-8 to VLAN 20. Anything connected to VLAN 10 cannot talk to VLAN 20 unless there's an external device (another switch, router, etc) that bridges the connection. For all intents and purposes they're now functionally two separate switches. This is useful when you don't want specific devices to talk to each other for security purposes. If you used VLAN's you need to run two separate uplink cables from the switch to the router in order to access the NAS and the cameras. For your use not only is there no need for this, it actually works against you if you plan to use your NAS to record anything from the cameras.

QoS (Quality of Service) is a set of protocols that prioritizes traffic based on need. Things that run realtime like cameras typically get a higher "priority" than things like copying a file. These priorities are adjustable, but most don't and go with the default industry values. A switch that supports QoS will handle your cameras better than an unmanaged switch because they can prioritize the data.

Looking real quick it looks like the Netgear GS516TP is going for $215USD right now. That's a 16 port, managed GigE switch with a 32gb backplane (meaning you could theoretically max out the throughput on all ports simultaneously) with PoE. That's probably your best bet. I'd leave everything else wired as you have it now, unless your planning on using the NAS to record video from the cameras in which case I'd move it to this new switch to keep the traffic on one switch.
 

MorePower

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Anything connected to VLAN 10 cannot talk to VLAN 20 unless there's an external device (another switch, router, etc) that bridges the connection.
I'd leave everything else wired as you have it now, unless your planning on using the NAS to record video from the cameras in which case I'd move it to this new switch to keep the traffic on one switch.
Thanks for all the detailed replies. Helps out a lot.

So lets say I have all my cameras and NAS on VLAN 10, PC2 on VLAN 20 (Would PC2 even need to be on a VLAN?) and PC1 directly to the router, will I be able to view the camera feed from these two PC's and remotely on my phone app or will I need to go into the switch and point the cameras to be accessible by these PC's?
I have a Synology NAS that uses the Surveillance Station app and this is what needs to be accessible to the PC's in my home and remotely on my phone app.

This is what worries me because I never had the need to setup VLAN's before and never owned a managed switch. I don't think there is that much to setup but if I don't know what to look for then I'll be scratching my head for hours.
 

JD

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Without a VLAN-capable router, no, you won't be able to access it. If your router supports VLANs, then it may be accessible by default unless you put firewall rules between, really depends on what the router's "default" is.

I don't think you really need VLANs in this case though.
 

Skippman

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Confirming what JD said, don't mess with VLAN's. They really don't have a place in home/soho networking. QoS basically took over for that from a traffic management standpoint.
 

lcdguy

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Though if your are in the market for a switch I would also recommend looking at getting one with more porta than you need price difference isn't normally huge but gives you more flexibility and expansion potential down the road.
 
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