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Rants etc.....

clshades

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Joined
May 18, 2011
Messages
4,450
Location
Big White Ski Resort
ok, guys how can this not be a simple answer the shutoff is 5 inch's inside my house so they shouldn't be any warm ( its a cold water line ) making it outside unless you mean the cold air going up the pipe which again it's so far inside I am not sure if it could.

So what I did was open the outside faucet letting the water run then turned off the inside valve to shut off the water and to make sure there was no water left in that line, then I closed the outside valve.

cold air will follow the pipe. I've seen it go 3 feet in before no problem. If there is even the slightest bit of airflow then you are completely screwed. Put it this way... it happens often enough that we stock hose bibs. Air flow causes evaporation, which causes ice to form, which causes things to crack and break. Or hoar frost forms where the warm meets the cold and creates ice in the pipe. Anyway...

The valve you are talking about probably has a little bleeder cap on it too, to drain down the hose bib all the way to the valve. The bleeder (drain) cap should be on the side the hose bib is on. Don't fn-drop the cap!!! lol. To drain it close the valve, open the hosebib tap, drain into bucket from the bleeder cap, replace cap, close hosebib.

bleeder valve.png
 
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sswilson

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Staff member
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Dec 9, 2006
Messages
21,518
Location
Moncton NB
Why would you leave it open? It will get condensation where the warm meets the cold and it will make ice. Which could cause a leak later. Definately close it.

I would have thought leaving the outside tap open would be best to prevent any trapped water from expanding and damaging the pipes. (My outside taps are all the newer ones)

Not that my thinking is correct, that's just the way I've always thought it works... :)
 

gingerbee

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Joined
Jan 22, 2009
Messages
8,541
Location
Orillia, Ontario
I only have 2 valves 1 outside and one up the same line about 10 inches about 5 inches inside the basement wall. I turned on the outside valve to let water flow then I turned off the inside valve thinking that the water would flow out what's left in the pipe then closed the outside valve lol.
 

clshades

Well-known member
Joined
May 18, 2011
Messages
4,450
Location
Big White Ski Resort
I would have thought leaving the outside tap open would be best to prevent any trapped water from expanding and damaging the pipes. (My outside taps are all the newer ones)

Not that my thinking is correct, that's just the way I've always thought it works... :)

All those hosebibs are frost free. You don't want the frost getting past the end of that frost free zone.
The actual shut off is at the bottom of the lower arrow. If the valve is installed correctly, slightly sloped away from house, it will drain every time you close the valve. Little cap thing on the top is the vacuum breaker to allow the water to come out.
frost free.png
 
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gingerbee

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Joined
Jan 22, 2009
Messages
8,541
Location
Orillia, Ontario
Ya I don't have any of those I have 2 normal valves on the cold water linen leading to outside one inside the basement one outside and there is only shut off on my kitchen sink not even on the bathroom. which sucks but at least it's all copper no galvanized anywhere, The thing I don't like if I want to go Pex to fix anything I have to use a Sharkbite "I think" cause I have never seen any type of crimp for going from copper to Pex

edit Holy lee shit slap my ass and call me Shirly there is a little valve on the side of it, I couldn't see it cause it was covered by some pink insulation
 

Izerous

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Folding Team
Joined
Feb 7, 2019
Messages
1,884
Location
Edmonton
More plumbing hate.... Jalo faucet was nothing but problems and over the weekend developed yet another issue resulting in me just outright replacing it last night. Hopefully this Pfister one proves to be a bit more reliable. 2 years and 4 failures seems like a pretty bad track record for a kitchen faucet won't really be a hard record to beat I hope.
 

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