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Recommend a mesh network system?

Izerous

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Does mesh add latency? It's it kind of the same as adding an AP, but just a lot more AP's? Does each acces point get hardwired?
Mesh doesn't require hardwire but there is a performance hit from being on a node instead of the root. Hardwiring the nodes drastically reduces the hit.

IIRC the numbers correctly my phone speed tests were 180 up/down when connected to the root, and 110-120 while on a node.
 

Soultribunal

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So far I have had good success with the D-Link Covr (the newer one looks nicer, mine is the older style with One Gateway and 3 AP's). Though my speeds regardless of where I am in the house are very good.

Netgear's Orbi's are nice as well. I like the configuration options better for the Netgear than the D-Link. They really 'dumb' it down on the D-Link side to simplify installation but on the same token you lose some customization that you might enjoy if you enjoy networking.

I still think Ubiquiti is the best overall, but some of their stuff you gotta pay to play so to speak.

-ST
 

CMetaphor

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Thanks for the alt suggestions ST. I'm researching it when I can, but haven't been feeling that well for a few days, everything has sorta stalled.

And i definitely would hardwire all nodes. I bought a PoE switch specifically to power such a wireless network. Afaik that means the intra- communication between the units would be lessened to the point of only having to do handoffs when someone crossed from one unit's coverage area to another?

I just don't know enough about how these systems work, yet. I think that's how I'd *like* it to work: PoE nodes, all hardwired, excellent coverage and the additional channel/frequency is only used between them for such likes like that example case: moving between coverage areas. But beyond those things, I just don't know.

Maybe the simplified Dlink Covr system would be best for me, provided it meets those aboves expectations I have.
 

JD

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The newest iteration of Google's Nest WiFi is neat in that each "pod" or AP acts similar to a Google Home Mini, so you can have some home automation ability along with the smart speaker functionality.

However, the latest Eero system is probably one of the most affordable currently now that it's under Amazon: https://www.amazon.ca/Introducing-eero-mesh-WiFi-system-3-pack-/dp/B081BQYN8S, at $262 (with a free Echo Dot), I think that's a pretty risk-free one to try. Worst case, you can send it back to Amazon.

None of these consumer mesh products are designed for PoE though, they connect wirelessly to eachother and act as an AP to extend coverage.

If you really want PoE access points, then you're back to Ubiquiti or other brands like Ruckus (lowfat got some for cheap), or the enterprise gear from D-Link, TP-Link, Cisco, etc.
 

Izerous

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Afaik that means the intra- communication between the units would be lessened to the point of only having to do handoffs when someone crossed from one unit's coverage area to another?
Nodes can be placed further apart without performance hit, and bandwidth usage would be over the wire back to the main node resuting in better through put.
 

Soultribunal

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JD has a good point though CM. I must have missed it but I do not believe the D-Link or Netgear have POE Compatibility.
You link the Nodes to the Core and then once configured set them up with their own Power Adapters throughout the house.
It obviously won't be as good as Hardwiring them, but I can honestly say that Upstairs (which in my house was notoriously bad for Signal) I can get over 150MB/s Throughput with either of my Laptops easily (and, I can even turn my 51M into a Repeater with one of its Antennas if I want LOL).

-ST
 

Entz

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Even if you can't power them with POE, at least they are hardwired. Using a wireless backhaul in places where you don't have strong wifi seems quite counter productive. Sure your devices see full bar but it can never get out fast enough to matter.
 

JD

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Even if you can't power them with POE, at least they are hardwired. Using a wireless backhaul in places where you don't have strong wifi seems quite counter productive. Sure your devices see full bar but it can never get out fast enough to matter.
I think the way it's supposed to work is that you put the pod/node in a spot with better signal to amplify it into the location with poor signal. Though I'm sure lots of people do as you say and think putting it in the spot with bad signal is going to somehow make it all better.
 

CMetaphor

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Regardless, non -poe APs are a dealbreaker. I'm running my modem, router and Poe switch on a large ups precisely so that i don't lose internet during brown outs or power failures. With Poe providing power i don't need an extra ups for each AP.

So I guess ubiquiti is my only option then? What if i go non-mesh and just use two or three strong independent APs, and let the devices themselves switch between them based off of signal strength? It's not as clean as a mesh, but it works still work i guess.
 

JD

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What you describe is roaming, devices moving between APs without signal loss or connection drop. Mesh implies the APs connected to each other wirelessly, ideally to multiple APs, but generally not the case.

Ubiquiti's AP's support both, though the roaming aspect still doesn't work 100% seamlessly, but I would say it's generally good enough for home usage. You'll also need to keep the UniFi Controller running on your PC for things to work optimally, or you can buy a CloudKey which runs the controller on hardware similar to a Raspberry Pi.

That said, you are looking at "enterprise" level gear either way to get PoE support. That simply doesn't exist at a consumer level. Ubiquiti is likely the most affordable choice, but you can pickup used Cisco, Ruckus, etc gear off eBay too. TP-Link, TrendNET, Engenius, and other "value" brands offer various APs too.

And of course, since you are moving into the SMB/Enterprise networking, the learning curve might be a bit more drastic. It isn't going to entirely be plug n' play like consumer equipment. Ubiquiti is probably the closest to that but you still need to install the controller and configure everything from there.

The UAP-AC-LR (~$140) or UAP-AC-nanoHD (~$225) would be my suggestions on the Ubiquiti side, depending on the price point you deem acceptable. I would start with 2 though, above/below these iron rails you speak of, unless you have a lot of square footage. Get them mounted up on the ceiling if you can.

I believe most AC-LR stock should be supporting standard 802.af PoE now, but you might want to double check with the store as originally it was only 24V passive (assuming your switch doesn't support this, most don't).
 

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