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RTX 2080Ti Models & other 2080 ti buying info

danmitch1

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Dec 15, 2007
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Hey Guys, Im thinking of getting a 2080Ti (one on the forum here perhaps).
The models im seeing basically have from 1545mhz core boost clock all the way to I think I saw 1860mhz and some with faster ram, seem to all have the same amount of cuda cores.

If you water cooled the cheapest one and overclocked the hell out of it, theoretically, you could match some of these 2000$+ hybrid versions right?
 

FreeKnight

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Possibly, the caveat is that you'll be throwing the dice on the silicon lottery. You might get a chip that OCs well, or you might only squeeze another 100mhz out of it. The pre-binned chips that go into models like say a 'Kingpin' edition EVGA are guaranteed to get the listed speeds.

After the cost of a custom block and loop you may (usually) are just better off buying the better version of the card, but a lot of factors play into that obviously.

One thing to watch for is that there is two types of RTX2080ti chips, 300 and 300A chips. The 'A' chips have a higher max power draw and I believe can have Bios' swapped which can allow a lot more performance.

There's a handy list here that shows each model, the chip, # of powerphases and clock speed;

In theory, you could buy the cheapest reference card that has the highest clock speed like a Zotac Amp at 1665Mhz and slap a cooler on it and try to get it to the speed of an Amp Extreme at 1815Mhz. You may or may not succeed. You might even get a stable OC well above 1815, it's kind of luck of the draw. A lot of the custom cards have more power phases so that could affect results, but our more knowledgeable members would need to chime in as I just don't know enough about that.

And keep in mind there is often waterblocks available for some of the custom cards, it can get really pricey and hard to sell at a later date since they can't be used on reference PCBs.
 

danmitch1

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Dec 15, 2007
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Thanks for your insight, very helpful!
Now, that all being said. How much more performance are we talking about, like what will 300 more mhz on 2080ti really make much of a difference other than benchmarks? Like the bottom of the barrel 300 series chip you mentioned is still a really ridiculously powerful card right?

Any opinions on the one up for sale in the buy sell forum here
 

FreeKnight

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Depends on the games your playing, monitor resolution and refresh rate. If you're gaming at 1080p or 1440p you probably wouldn't notice the difference. You'll already get a massively high frame rate. At 4K or 3440, you might see a few FPS which makes more difference when you're pushing 45-60 fps on max settings. You're right though any 2080ti is still a beast of a gaming card.

Meh, I'm not a fan of the Asus turbo card it's possibly the worst 2080ti. A blower cooler isn't really sufficient, even the nvidia reference cards use dual fans now. If you were putting in a tiny mitx case or had no airflow so it had to exhaust out the back maybe, but it's just not a great card.

Considering you can get a new 2080ti for around $1170-1300 there's no way I'd pay 1200 for a blower non-A 2080ti, That's not a good price. It isn't worth be worth potentially having no warranty (I can't remember ASUS stance on 2nd hand) or not knowing how well the card was treated. At $1000 it'd be a bit more realistic depending on your personal tolerance for risk. I would shell out the difference for a new card in a heartbeat for the very meager savings in this case.

Hell I was thinking of listing my Zotac Amp Gaming in Feb since I'll be too busy to play and I wouldn't even expect people to pay 1200 for it and it's mint with box and all. Of course YRMV on this.
 

danmitch1

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Dec 15, 2007
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I would buy yours off you, much better card.
Just found a zotac gaming amp bnib for 1240$ near by. No proof of purchase though. But apparently it can be validated with the serial number. Just sent zotac an email to check.
 

Izerous

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Edmonton
Not all cards have the same PCB layout in some generations. Often the reference cards are the ones most likely to even have a water block available. Sometimes the tweaked PCBs never actually have water blocks designed to be compatible with them, sometimes they get limited runs water locks with a higher price tag.
 

danmitch1

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Dec 15, 2007
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So buying a water block might end up being only suitable for one gpu model. Basically
 

FreeKnight

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So buying a water block might end up being only suitable for one gpu model. Basically
If you buy one for a custom PCB than almost certainly. Example; the 1080Ti ASUS Strix had EKWB custom blocks but they literally fit only the strix cards.
If you get the reference block it'll work with any reference PCB, but you won't have the guarantee of the same minimum speeds that you would on a Strix, Kingpin, AMP Extreme, etc. It'll basically come down to chance as to how much you'll be able to OC.
 

danmitch1

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Dec 15, 2007
Messages
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OK so I will keep that all in mind, thanks
What do you think about the post below?
I would buy yours off you, much better card.
Just found a zotac gaming amp bnib for 1240$ near by. No proof of purchase though. But apparently it can be validated with the serial number. Just sent zotac an email to check.
 

FreeKnight

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Edmonton, AB
That's a reasonable price. Brand new price is going to be minimum $1600 after GST. If you live outside of Alberta it'll be worse after whatever PST/HST you pay.

If you can get confirmation there's still some warranty by serial # and it's genuinely BNIB, that's fair. If it's been opened, just make sure you take a look at the card, look for missing screws, signs of tampering or ideally see it plugged in an confirmed with GPU-Z or something. Some people were getting fleeced back in the day by people who were putting shrouds from other cards and throwing them on lesser GPUs.

If you know the person it's not a huge risk, but it's worth being careful on such pricey piece of hardware.
 

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