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Seagate working on a spinning rust drive that is NVMe connected

Izerous

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I'm not really sure I understand the benefit of this unless SATA is bottlenecking the HDDs,
Sata III = 600MB/s (6Gb/s)
First Gen Dual Actuator drives are capable of sustained ~520MB/s
so yes SATA is very close to being the bottle neck.

"Performance Characteristics: SAS 12Gb/s vs. SATA 6Gb/s. The first-generation MACH.2 product will come very close to saturating the SATA 6Gb/s interface (600MB/s throughput). As stated above, the drive will have a 520MB/s sustained data rate (SDR) and next-generation drives will perform even better. Hence, the design decision was made to enable ecosystem and storage architectures to readily deploy next-generation MACH.2 drives without changing interface protocols."


This is all server based stuff for now it will be years before we see this trickle down either way. Basically these new drives are already SAS only because SATA isn't close to being enough for them. A quad-actuator drive would almost saturate a SAS connection
 

Entz

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NVMe is a much lighter / lower latency protocol that doesn't have all the baggage AHCI/SAS has. Once you go large cache/multi-actuator the single command queue (32 commands max/254 for SAS) and single interrupt design of ACHI starts to bite you in the arse. NVMe doesn't have those restrictions (65K queues at 65k command each, 2048 interrupts, hardware offload etc).

This also gets super simple NVMeOF and easier consistent backplane designs
 

Shadowarez

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we would need new design for raid cards in future instead of 2 sas ports with break out cables we would need have something with new connector by time i get this nas up and running it will be maybe 2 years in service before change over.
 

Entz

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Those already exist, this is nothing really new to enterprise. SFF-8653 / SFF-8654 already carries PCIe and SAS. The U.3 spec exists to combine everything into a single drive connector in a nice clean way vs U.2/SATA express -- fewer pins, better management.

There have been hybrid controller available for a while (2017+) that that combine SATA/SAS and NVMe. A "Port" is essentially either a PCIe lane or SAS. So a 8 port card can be 2 x4 or 8 x1 (max 4 per device, same as U.2) or 8 SAS or any combination really. I think there are backplane expander type switches but I haven't looked.
Intel has rebranded ones etc.

Some light reading on U.3 I found : https://www.storagereview.com/news/evolving-storage-with-sff-ta-1001-u-3-universal-drive-bays
 
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Entz

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As mentioned earlier PCIe lanes is your biggest enemy, I hope AM5 does another industry changing moment (like consumer cores vs enterprise/Hedt) and runs 32+ G5 from the CPU but I am not holding my breath - artificial silos and shareholders and all that.
 

Sagath

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As mentioned earlier PCIe lanes is your biggest enemy, I hope AM5 does another industry changing moment (like consumer cores vs enterprise/Hedt) and runs 32+ G5 from the CPU but I am not holding my breath - artificial silos and shareholders and all that.
Considering threadrippers have had 64 lanes for (3) generations, I'd take a guess they'll increase it next gen. Will it translate down to consumer? Well we might get the 64 that TR had...
 

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