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Speaker recommendations

3.0charlie

3.0 "I kill SR2's" Charlie
Joined
May 22, 2007
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Laval, QC
Before buying new, I would have looked at the used audiophile market: https://www.canuckaudiomart.com/. Same for an amplifier, I'd see what is offered nearby before buying new. Audiophiles are anal about their gear.

Bought and sold a few times over there. Good experience.

https://www.canuckaudiomart.com/classifieds/26-bookshelf-speakers/?filter=&province=BC&price_min=&price_max=&photo=N&show_other_marts=N

https://www.canuckaudiomart.com/classifieds/56-solid-state-integrated-amplifiers/?filter=&province=BC&price_min=&price_max=&photo=N&show_other_marts=N
 
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Prickly007

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Jul 8, 2014
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1,350
Location
Metro-Vancouver
Thanks for the suggestions JD (and 3.0charlie)! The NAD D3020 was almost exactly what I was looking for, but the crossover frequency- look ma, I learned a new term :haha: - is potentially a little high. Manual was somewhat vague.

I think I found the best compromise, a Yamaha integrated amplifier (A-S301). It's got an optical in and a sub-out, which attenuates signals over 90 Hz. Plus, if I understand correctly, it could be made to work with my computer and TV, if I ever want to upgrade my soundbar to a pair of passive speakers. Either I would need an optical switch, or just change the input as needed.

Only real down side that I can see so far-still over-thinking everything- is that it's huge.

After more time last night than I care to admit.... All the small desktop-style amps mentioned at overclock.net, etc that I had wanted to buy either lacked an optical in, had misleading specs or were of dubious quality/longevity.
 

Bond007

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Joined
Jun 24, 2009
Messages
6,247
Location
Nova Scotia
Thanks for the suggestions JD (and 3.0charlie)! The NAD D3020 was almost exactly what I was looking for, but the crossover frequency- look ma, I learned a new term :haha: - is potentially a little high. Manual was somewhat vague.

I think I found the best compromise, a Yamaha integrated amplifier (A-S301). It's got an optical in and a sub-out, which attenuates signals over 90 Hz. Plus, if I understand correctly, it could be made to work with my computer and TV, if I ever want to upgrade my soundbar to a pair of passive speakers. Either I would need an optical switch, or just change the input as needed.

Only real down side that I can see so far-still over-thinking everything- is that it's huge.

After more time last night than I care to admit.... All the small desktop-style amps mentioned at overclock.net, etc that I had wanted to buy either lacked an optical in, had misleading specs or were of dubious quality/longevity.

Looks solid to me... Yamaha tend to be a very warm clean sound, so I would think it would pair well with the klipsch speakers (klipsch are a bit bright, so you wouldn’t a bright amp with it).

Curious what the self proclaimed audiophiles think.
 

JD

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Jul 16, 2007
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Toronto, ON
I'm by no means an audiophile, but that Yamaha A-S301 is roughly the same size as a full 5.1+ AVR, what's the reasoning behind not using an AVR?

I use a Sony STR-DN1050 for my computer setup as it's what I had in the living room before I moved to 4K/HDR. I run it in "pure direct" mode with 5.1 speakers and use DD Live encoding on my Soundblaster Zx over optical. Before that, I ran a cheap Harmon Kardon AVR700.

Maybe it's just cause I have cheap speakers? I have Klipsch C-10 center and Klipsch B-10 bookshelves, rears are from my old ProMedia Ultra 5.1 set, subwoofer is a 8" downfiring Martin Logan. Sounds good enough to me though and goes way louder than I'd ever need :whistle:
 

Prickly007

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Jul 8, 2014
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Location
Metro-Vancouver
what's the reasoning behind not using an AVR?

If I had a spare AVR, I'd be using it too.... Having said that, a generic answer is an integrated amp has a single function, while AVR have multiple ones. The result of that is more internally generated noise, i.e. a higher THD value.* Integrated amp is therefore more audiophile-ly. :haha:

* How much this matter is, I am guessing, a whole other issue.

In the case of Yamaha, I read today that the S series is built to a higher standard than their AVR V line.

Guess it can't hurt to take a closer look at an AVR or two, not only are they cheaper but Crutchfield only ships M-F anyway. Soon I'll be overthinking my overthinking. :shok:

edit: missing word
 
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