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Tesla Truck ??? what do people think

Entz

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Joined
Jul 17, 2011
Messages
805
Yeah most never make it to market or end up being unfeasible when scaled up (i.e. great when its a postage stamp but a full cell cant be manufactured).
 

belgolas

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Joined
May 9, 2007
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4,227
Location
St. Thomas, Ontario
From the studies I have read even if the electricity you get only comes from coal it is still far better to have an EV than a gas car. Ontario is fine for electricity generation as about 90% of electricity in Ontario is produced from zero-carbon emitting sources and we have plenty to spare. Alberta though needs to get off of fossil fuels. I am a huge supporter of nuclear power so that is one choice that is zero carbon emitting for base load power generation.

As far as range goes the vast majority of people drive less than 100km a day so even the worst EV can do that. It is just for the occasional longer trips that people would need either a hybrid or gas car. Seeing as most households have multiple vehicles it would make sense for every household to own at least 1 EV.

As far as charging stations go it will come with time that more people will build them as they get more profitable. Governments can also greatly speed up the building of these charging stations. Most home owners wouldn't need to use a charging station other than the occasional long trip. If you rent an apartment then maybe you can get the land lord to build one in the parking garage or lot.

I know some people don't even have to pay to charge their EV. Some charge them for free at work. One teacher I talked to charged his car at school and never had to charge at home. So it almost cost him nothing to drive that vehicle. Also EV's are not that much more than gas cars especially when you factor in government subsidies and long term costs of cheaper power and no oil changes and other maintenance.
 

Prickly007

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Jul 8, 2014
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1,029
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Metro-Vancouver
I am a huge supporter of nuclear power....
And what does one do with all the waste for the next 1 to 1000+ years?

There is not one solution fits all to decarbonising (the electric grid). Hydroelectric makes sense in BC, Texas (where I lived for years) not so much. The opposite applies to solar power; when I took back my ulterly destroyed Tilley hat, the staff wanted to know how many decades it had lasted. My answer, which utterly astonished them, roughly four and a half years in the Texas sun.
 

ipaine

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Joined
Apr 13, 2008
Messages
2,875
Location
Edmonton, AB
From the studies I have read even if the electricity you get only comes from coal it is still far better to have an EV than a gas car. Ontario is fine for electricity generation as about 90% of electricity in Ontario is produced from zero-carbon emitting sources and we have plenty to spare. Alberta though needs to get off of fossil fuels. I am a huge supporter of nuclear power so that is one choice that is zero carbon emitting for base load power generation.
The real issue I see isn't really the type of power (well that is a major concern too) but the availability of enough power period. Yes I know these things will get worked out eventually but I do think that the EVs will start to create more of a drain than most grids are capable of before we get to improving the grids themselves. Mainly since improving them will take significantly more money and time than people buying EVs.

As far as range goes the vast majority of people drive less than 100km a day so even the worst EV can do that. It is just for the occasional longer trips that people would need either a hybrid or gas car. Seeing as most households have multiple vehicles it would make sense for every household to own at least 1 EV.
Well, the entire most don't drive more than 100km a day thing is not an argument for EVs. Until EVs are as convenient as gas, they will not take off completely. At no point am I ever wondering if I have been plugged in long enough to make a sudden trip if need be. I know with a gas car, if I need to I can just get in and go. If I have to drive to the hospital or two hours down the road, or try to get to my parents place quickly (1200km away almost no chargers the entire way), I know I can do that with a gas car. But get charging down to 15 minutes or so to get say another 600km, then we are talking usability.

As far as charging stations go it will come with time that more people will build them as they get more profitable. Governments can also greatly speed up the building of these charging stations. Most home owners wouldn't need to use a charging station other than the occasional long trip. If you rent an apartment then maybe you can get the land lord to build one in the parking garage or lot.
Yes charging stations will increase, but I completely envision them costing a lot more to charge than they are now. I just don't see Petro Canada, or Telsa, or frankly anyone else letting prices for electricity at the chargers stay really low. Once the most of us are dependent on them, mark my words you will see prices climb and climb quickly. And as for getting a land lord to build one, lol. Sorry but since everyone has assigned parking spots in most places, you would really only be able to pull it off if they did it for each unit and that is not going to happen until they are basically forced to do it.

I know some people don't even have to pay to charge their EV. Some charge them for free at work. One teacher I talked to charged his car at school and never had to charge at home. So it almost cost him nothing to drive that vehicle. Also EV's are not that much more than gas cars especially when you factor in government subsidies and long term costs of cheaper power and no oil changes and other maintenance.
Sure I could charge at work, well in two spots I think, but I think they are designated just for work vehicles. But relying on work to charge your vehicle is not a solution to costs or ease of use. And subsidies are there many of those left in Canada? I don't think there are in Alberta, but maybe the rest of the country is not that bad.
 

KaptCrunch

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Joined
Feb 23, 2008
Messages
4,183
Location
Ontario
Still EV not using solar panels on roof to give a really clean charge, also self generating like coasting down a hill sure will help battery capacity
 

Izerous

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Joined
Feb 7, 2019
Messages
567
Location
Edmonton
There are small rebates in Alberta the biggest rebates are coming form the dealerships directly which menas its up to the whim of who your buying it through.
 

gingerbee

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Joined
Jan 22, 2009
Messages
7,487
Location
Orillia, Ontario
thorium is the new one there looking at for nuclear power and from the little bit, I have read its super clean when compared to old nuclear power.
Plus no matter what I think we're going to see the power go up just based on demand ( globally ) but I don't think it will be because Petro Canada/oil companies want it to I think the scale of demand is going to go up across the world once there are cheap electric vehicles all can afford which is many many years down the pipeline. I also think people are thinking that coal/oil is going away in there lifetime ya right maybe our grandkids
 

KaptCrunch

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Joined
Feb 23, 2008
Messages
4,183
Location
Ontario
Come on its national security, oil companies and the dick Cheney's of politics won't allow it.... .greed.

They can't make any money on that free energy
 

belgolas

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Joined
May 9, 2007
Messages
4,227
Location
St. Thomas, Ontario
And what does one do with all the waste for the next 1 to 1000+ years?

There is not one solution fits all to decarbonising (the electric grid). Hydroelectric makes sense in BC, Texas (where I lived for years) not so much. The opposite applies to solar power; when I took back my ulterly destroyed Tilley hat, the staff wanted to know how many decades it had lasted. My answer, which utterly astonished them, roughly four and a half years in the Texas sun.
There isn't that much waste. All the nuclear waste the US produced since 1950 could fit in one football field about 9 meters deep. Also once generation 4 nuclear reactors are made they will be able to recycle used nuclear waste and that waste will have a very short half life that would only need to be stored for less than 100 years. Nuclear waste isn't that big an issue and is way overblown in the media.
 
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