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The NVIDIA SHIELD Tablet Review

SKYMTL

HardwareCanuck Review Editor
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NVIDIA’s SHIELD ecosystem originally started as a simple technology demonstrator and has now become one of the more enticing mobile gaming solutions around. Since its launch the original SHIELD portable has gradually evolved into an all-inclusive gaming platform, albeit in a form factor that isn’t appealing for people that want tablet-like flexibility and portability. This is where the new SHIELD Tablet comes into the equation.

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The SHIELD Tablet isn’t NVIDIA’s first foray into the tablet market -the original Tegra Note carries that distinction- so it goes without saying that previous experiences have been strong influencers this time around. With a focus on delivering the ultimate portable gaming experience alongside all the usual features normally associated with high end tablets, this version of SHIELD hopes to accomplish a lot. More importantly, while other tablets like ASUS’ Transformer series have largely been on the leading front of technology and provide a more than adequate Android gaming experience, NVIDIA’s offering is able to do so much more and a very competitive price.

Judging by our hands on preview, NVIDIA certainly seemed to be on the right track with the SHIELD Tablet but that first look was done under controlled conditions. Now we finally have it in the wild and after two weeks of intensive use, our enthusiasm hasn’t been diminished and if anything the excitement has grown a bit because the amount of potential here is nearly limitless.


Form a specifications standpoint, the SHIELD Tablet is everything one could possibly want from a high end handheld. At its heart lies NVIDIA’s new Tegra K1 SoC which combines a 192-core dedicated graphics coprocessor, a quad core ARM A15 CPU running at 2.2GHz and 2GB of memory. While the 2.2GHz processor may not the the fastest on the black anymore, it has proven to be more than sufficient for application acceleration duties.

There has been a lot of talk about the K1’s inclusion of a Kepler GPU and there’s good reason for that: while most tablet SoC’s use third party graphics accelerators, NVIDIA has taken theirs directly from the PC world. This has allowed them to leverage the full stable of advanced technologies they’ve built up over the years, granting a huge advantage over the competition. While in relative terms the K1 has only about 1/3 the processing power of a GTX 750, NVIDIA’s lowest-end Kepler product consumes 55W while the entire K1 SoC, including those 192 CUDA cores requires less than 2W when fully engaged.


Past the obvious processing horsepower on tap here, NVIDIA has thrown in all the usual high end tablet features as well. There’s a 1920x1200 IPS screen, available LTE connectivity, a recessed stylus and HDMI out. Storage shouldn’t be a problem either since above and beyond the 16GB and 32GB capacities, the SHIELD Tablet also includes a MicroSD card slot which is good for up to 128GB of space provided you are willing to invest in a larger add-in card.

While SHIELD Tablet’s capabilities place it in the upper tiers among its so-called competitors, the real selling point here is the feature set NVIDIA is offering. After all, a device is only as good as its applications allow it to be so gamer-specific programs like ShadowPlay, TegraZone, NVIDIA GRID and GameStream have been added. Without those apps, this $299 (16GB WiFi) to $399 (32GB LTE) tablet would be nothing more than another premium-priced Android device without anything to distinguish itself as unique.

 

SKYMTL

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A Closer Look at the SHIELD Tablet

A Closer Look at the SHIELD Tablet



The first thing you will likely notice about the SHIELD Tablet is its high quality construction. Its 8” screen has a relatively minimal border and is covered in edge to edge Gorilla Glass which terminates on each side at a nearly seamless edge. Meanwhile, a thickness of 9.2mm belies the impressive amount of processing horsepower residing within the body’s restricted confines. Whereas the original SHIELD was a bulky affair, this one is light at just 390 grams and no thicker than most smartphones which makes it infinitely more portable and useful in a wider variety of situations.

While the design is stunning to look at, ergonomics could be a bit better. The 8” size can easily be manipulated in a single hand, the sharp edges created by the razor-thin transition between the glass and frame make holding the SHELD Tablet a bit uncomfortable. There’s a bit of a beveled edge here but it doesn’t do much for enhancing comfort. Google’s Nexus 7, Apple’s iPad and many other tablets feature slightly rounded edges that improve grip and help with overall comfort. Other than that, we really can’t find much to complain about since the form NVIDIA chose maximizes screen size while still retaining an acceptable device size.


Around back NVIDIA has chosen a soft-touch material with gracefully rounded edges which enhances grip and repels fingerprints quite well. Other than the slightly sharp edges we mentioned before, it feels perfect. The SHIELD logo is placed in horizontal orientation, hinting at how the device will most likely be help for gaming. There’s also a 5MP camera that lacks an LED flash and a small inset area that holds the included stylus.


The top and bottom edges (or left and right depending on the tablet’s orientation) house the SHIELD’s integrated speakers which have their sound augmented by a pair of small bass reflex ports carefully hidden on the tablet’s sides. The sound they create is surprisingly robust for such a thin device but their audio fidelity will likely be of secondary concern to most gamers since they’ll likely use headphones. With that in mind, we would have rather seen NVIDIA focus on offering a hardware-based headphone amplifier rather than sinking money into a speaker system that will be rarely used.

A front facing 5MP camera has been integrated into the top edge too which is perfect for the usual Skype calls or streaming your gaming session to Twitch through ShadowPlay.


With a scant 9mm to play with, NVIDIA made quite good use of the SHIELD Tablet’s frame. Other than the aforementioned bass reflex ports, there’s a 3.5mm headphone jack a mini HDMI 1.4a output and a micro USB port that’s used for charging.



All of the other function buttons and ports are clustered on the right-hand edge. There’s a MicroSD slot, the volume rocker, a power button and a MicroSD card slot. Meanwhile, there is also where the stylus resides, ready to be pulled from its holdster.

It may be due to our device being a pre-production model but its volume and power buttons lacked any kind of tactile feel. They seemed overly loose and didn’t have that satisfying feedback we’re used to from higher end tablets.


After holding the SHIELD Tablet you’ll be left with little doubt that NVIDIA was striving for the same premium feel of other high end tablets. For the most part, they pulled it off admirably with a clean design, nearly seamless construction and well designed integration of all periphery functions. Luckily, the points we brought up about comfort are purely subjective while the loosey-goosey buttons were likely due to a pre-production SNAFU.
 

SKYMTL

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The SHIELD Controller & SHIELD Cover

The SHIELD Controller & SHIELD Cover



If you ask any gamer about the worst elements of Android games, one subject that typically comes up is horrible input experience that comes with flailing around a touch screen in an effort to keep up with onscreen action. Simply put, touch screens exhibit too much room for error to be considered viable game controllers. In keeping with that knowledge, NVIDIA designed a purpose-built controller for their SHIELD Tablet, one which is also compatible with most PC games that can be streamed through it.

This $60 peripheral is, in our opinion, an essential purchase especially if you are buying the SHIELD for its GameStream abilities. On the front face it boasts a pair of basic analog sticks, a traditional d-pad and the usual YXAB buttons, mirroring an XBOX controller’s format.

In order to properly navigate the SHIELD’s Android operating system a number of buttons which mirror the tablet’s navigation buttons have been added. These actually pull double duty when streaming a PC game with the forward button acting as a start / stop function while the Home button starts the GameStream service. Meanwhile, the bottom area’s inverted v-shape silver area can be used as a touchpad and it also incorporates volume up/down functions.


The controller’s top also mirrors the button configuration found on the original SHIELD with two triggers and a pair of shoulder buttons. While a micro USB port has been added for charging, you’ll notice there isn’t a cord included since the controller communicates with the SHIELD over WiFi. This is a significant change over the numerous Android-compatible Bluetooth controllers already available on the market since NVIDIA claims it grants them additional bandwidth to reduce input lag.

Another tertiary benefit of using WiFi is that there’s enough bandwidth to stream audio signals to the controller as well. Hence why there is a 3.5mm headphone jack built directly into the controller next to the USB port. During testing, we didn’t have a problem sitting about 10 feet away from the SHIELD while it streamed a PC game on the TV and beamed perfectly recreated audio signals to the controller. There were a few rare instances of signal corruption but they were few and far between.


In comparison to the original SHIELD, the new controller is roughly the same size but it has just a fraction of the weight. It is also quite a bit more streamlined with none of the bulk associated with the SHIELD Tablet’s predecessor. Now this controller isn’t exactly ultra portable given the tablet’s svelte profile but if you want to game on the go, you’re better off brining it along for the ride.

Ergonomically speaking, we found it extremely hard to find fault with NVIDIA’s controller. While it may not be comfortable for anyone with child-like hand dimensions, we found it to be just right regardless of who was holding it. The buttons have an excellent tactile feel with just the right amount of pressure being required for it to register an input, though the d-pad does lack the signature “click” found on some other controllers.

Given the compact size of many Bluetooth-based Android controllers, the bulk of this one may be a turnoff for some who value portability over usability. But before the critique starts, one has to remember that much of the size is due to NVIDIA packing a ton of additional features into this thing; none of which are included with any of the other controllers.


The most praiseworthy thing of this controller isn’t its 40 hours of battery life or the numerous input / output options it brings to the table. Rather, its integration within a slightly modified Android ecosystem has been perfectly accomplished. Button presses or analog stick movements are registered almost instantly onscreen regardless of whether an Android or PC game is being played and its remaining battery life is displayed right alongside the WiFi and Bluetooth icons. NVIDIA is also hard at work with developers in an effort to bring more controller-compatible Android games to the market and there is already a significant number available.


Now the $40 SHIELD Cover may not be as sexy as a controller but it is nonetheless vital if you plan on gaming directly on the device. It clips directly onto the SHIELD’s lower edge via a pair of magnetic lips.

The reason why the cover is so vital comes down to screen positioning when gaming. It allows the SHIELD to be angled upright in three different positions depending on your preference which happens to be a necessity when you simply want to sit down on a couch with the controller and not worry about propping the SHIELD up next to a stack of books.


For the most part the cover works quite well but it does have some minor flaws that stem from its lowest position. While the more upright options allow access to the top-mounted volume / power buttons and stylus, this one does not, a fact that severely limits its usefulness for any task other than gaming with the SHIELD controller. We also found that due to the steep angle, additional pressure is put on the magnetic mounts so any semi-firm screen press cause them to disengage.

Is the SHIELD Cover really worth $40 on top of the hundreds being spent on the tablet and its associated controller? We think so since it is currently the only way to protect the SHIELD’s screen while also providing a useable screen angle for gaming and multimedia browsing. On the other hand, it isn’t without faults. We’d recommend it simply because it is currently the only game in town.
 

SKYMTL

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A Deep Dive into NVIDIA’s SHIELD Apps

A Deep Dive into NVIDIA’s SHIELD Apps



NVIDIA has instituted a number of changes to the SHIELD application ecosystem over the last year or so and all of them (plus more) have been rolled into the Tablet version. In addition, the number of SHIELD-supporting games has increased quite dramatically with some excellent classic PC games like Trine 2 and Half Life 2 being ported directly to Android.

Within the Tablet’s Apps section, you can also see which applications are NVIDIA Optimized meaning they either feature proper GPU acceleration or have been programmed to take advantage of the K1 SoC’s wide-ranging feature set. This is a handy addition that also carries over into the Tegra Zone’s Hub interface and shows which programs in the Play Store have been massaged for better performance on NVIDIA’s technology.

The SHIELD tablet also comes preloaded with a number of games and apps. Trine 2, Adobe Reader and Camera Awesome have been included while Half Life 2 is still available for free download to SHIELD buyers. The stylus also gets a number of programs suited to its features with NVIDIA Dabbler, Write, JustWrite and EverNote.


Past the obvious optimizations that have been built into SHIELD-supporting applications, NVIDIA also allows for automatic or fully manual processor performance profiles. There’s a High Performance mode which causes the K1 to dedicate its full resources when called upon and prevents the in-game throttling that usually happens when a table strives to maximize battery life. Naturally, some performance reduction will still occur if the processor hits its thermal limit but that’s to be expected.

The Optimized setting does exactly what you expect: it balances performance output and battery life so you’ll still be able to play games at a smooth framerate but it reduces SoC speeds when there’s sufficient overhead. For example, GPU frequencies will be capped if there’s enough processing power to easily achieve 30 FPS in an Android-based game.

Battery Savings is very much the lowest common denominator for anyone who wants the best possible performance out of the SHIELD Tablet. It puts a hard limit upon the K1 in an effort to achieve the best possible battery longevity. Meanwhile NVIDIA has also included a so-called My Power Mode which allows a user to customize a profile to their own specific needs.

The last option here is an Automatic Switch that can be used to maximize performance until the battery reaches a certain charge level, after which the SHIELD will switch itself into a lower power mode to extend battery life. This is a great addition if someone gets carried away with a game and they suddenly realize they need a bit more juice to post some messages to Facebook or get some work done.


The jump-off point for most things SHIELD related is the so-called Hub which gives you access to games, media, shopping and news. As we’ve already mentioned, the Shop section acts as a quasi Google Play Storecan but prioritizes NVIDIA-supporting titles.

This easy to use and well designed interface also gives you quick access to PC games provided your device is hooked up to a PC via GameStream. While it’s possible to access the host PC’s desktop and navigate with the SHIELD’s touchpad, we’d recommend simply using the standard interface which displays any title you currently have installed on Steam. Other games and programs can be added and launched by using Steam’s “Add Other Program” feature provided secondary services like UPlay or Origin remain running in the background.


Arguably one of the largest announcements for SHIELD in the last few months was the addition of Half Life 2 as an NVIDIA accelerated Android game. For the most part it has been faithfully translated with nearly all of the original title’s graphics features. While Half Life 2 may feel a bit dated, it can still provide hours of fun and its addition to the Android ecosystem will allow many more gamers to experience one of PC gaming’s crowning achievements.

When compared against other Android games, Half Life 2 is particularly demanding on the system since it features several advanced lighting and particle effects that haven’t been widely utilized up to now. Luckily, the K1 has enough of a graphics backbone to cut through these demands like a hot knife through butter. We didn’t experience any significant slowdowns but don’t expect to be playing at 60FPS.


Trine 2 is another recent addition to the SHIELD lineup and comes pre-installed onto the SHIELD Tablet. While it may be a side-scroller, its beautiful 3D scenery and onscreen effects gobble up a ton of resources. Unlike Half Life 2, we could tell that the K1 was struggling a bit here with certain intense combat scenes temporarily dropping below the 30FPS mark. The game’s load times were also quite long but none of these factors really detracted from what is a great example of a cross-platform title that works extremely well on the SHIELD Tablet.
 

SKYMTL

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ShadowPlay Comes to SHIELD / NVIDIA’s DirectStylus

ShadowPlay Comes to SHIELD / NVIDIA’s DirectStylus



ShadowPlay is a relatively new addition to NVIDIA’s desktop and notebook graphics processors but it has nonetheless been received with open arms by many gamers. It essentially leverages the compute power housed within the Kepler architecture to take over high level in-game screen recording and broadcasting tasks without negatively impacting overall performance. It can even be set to automatically set up a stream directly to Twitch.tv. Since the K1 housed within the SHIELD Tablet features 192 Kepler-based CUDA cores, NVIDIA has been able to port ShadowPlay over to the Android OS.

Much like on the desktop, ShadowPlay’s mobile version includes a number of basic options. There’s both manual (start recording by pressing a hotkey) and automatic recording (which starts whenever a game is launched) and the ability to turn on the SHIELD’s front-facing camera which captures your mug while streaming to Twitch. Chat can also be enabled for community interactions.


In its normal recording mode ShadowPlay keeps a preset amount of recording data in its buffer, ready to be either saved or deleted. This can be set at anything from one to 20 minutes, which insures your feats are captured even if the manual record button wasn’t pressed.


NVIDIA’s option list here is quite extensive with support for different orientations, quality settings, output audio levels and overlay positions. The quality settings will have a big impact on file size but since ShadowPlay saves its videos in MP4 format, they’re typically quite compact anyways.

Android users may not necessarily see much of a point in ShadowPlay right now but it is actually quite useful for gamers. As the complexity and popularity of Android-based games expands, this application’s ease of use, minimal performance impact and straightforward nature will likely keep it at the forefront as competitors begin to take shape.


NVIDIA’s DirectStylus



The inclusion of a stylus with the SHIELD Tablet is a bit of a surprise since it doesn’t really have any use in gaming scenarios. However, it does allow you to quickly jot down notes with EverNote alongside the included handwriting recognition software.

The DirectStylus itself is quite accurate, though there is a noticeable amount of lag between your own movements and when the tablet’s hardware detects them.


NVIDIA’s GPU-accelerated Dabbler software is currently being used as a showcase app for their stylus, though it isn’t anything more than a fancy paint program. If you are more artistically inclined than we are, it could come in handy but otherwise this is nothing more than a technology showcase for the K1’s acceleration capabilities.
 

SKYMTL

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Performance vs. SHIELD Portable

Performance vs. SHIELD Portable


With the Tablet being the second device in NVIDIA’s SHIELD lineup, we wanted to see how it fared against its sibling, the SHIELD Portable. Granted this will be a huge mismatch considering the Handheld is powered by the Tegra 4 SoC with just 72 graphics cores but it will highlight how far technology has progressed in the last year and what kind of performance difference there is between these two devices. One thing that should be mention is that NVIDIA current has no plans to bring the Tegra K1 to the SHIELD Handheld, but that may change in the future.






As we said, this is a mismatch of titanic proportions, particularly on the graphics processing side but it goes to show that NVIDIA has been able to drastically enhance overall performance while also improving battery life. While the SHIELD Portable is still a perfectly capable gaming device (particularly for GameStream use) and its CPU cores perform very well, the SHIELD Tablet can do significantly more and also adds a healthy dose of future proofing. With that being said, mobile technology is moving so quickly these days that the K1 will likely be in the same position as Tegra 4 is today within a year or less.
 

SKYMTL

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Screen Quality & Thermals

Screen Quality



The SHIELD Tablet’s 8” 1920x1200 IPS screen may not be the highest resolution one on the market but its relatively high level of pixel density makes for some stunning-looking images. The difference between this panel and the postage stamp sized one on the SHIELD Portable couldn’t be more extreme. Whereas the first generation SHIELD barely had enough screen real estate for gaming, the Tablet couldn’t have a better blend of size and portability.

Color reproduction is also (subjectively at least) nearly spot on without the slightly blueish tint of the latest Nexus 7 or the overly warm pallet of ASUS’ Transformer. Skin tones in movies remain naturally health looking while games benefit from the neutral screen coloration as well. Every now and then there is a bit of ghosting apparent but that can be forgiven on an IPS panel of this quality. Another welcome sight is a complete lack of backlight bleed, something that has been plaguing several other high end tablets as of late.


Viewing angles are a key metric for the SHIELD Tablet since it is designed to be used as a portable gaming station. That means finding an optimal angle shouldn’t be a lesson in futility but luckily NVIDIA installed a panel that boasts impeccable viewing angles, so much so that you can view the tablet almost edge-on without a loss of contrast or image fidelity.


Thermal Imaging


Higher end tablets always face the same problem: customers demand speed but they also want the thinnest profile possible. Cramming progressively higher end components into a limited amount of space means there’s less area for heatsinks to cool down sometimes hot running components. While advances in manufacturing processes have somewhat mitigated excess thermal buildup, many tablets are still forced to use aluminum chassis which also act as an external heatsink. The end result is sometimes an uncomfortably hot tablet or processor throttling.


When taken at face value, NVIDIA seems to have created a perfect storm for themselves: the Tegra K1 is one of today’s fastest mobile processors and it will spend the vast majority of its life running demanding applications. Meanwhile, the SHIELD Tablet’s external skin is coated in a soft-touch finish rather than aluminum which can act as a quasi external heatsink. By all sane thinking, this SHIELD should run extremely hot….but it doesn’t. Nor does the K1’s performance throttle, even when it’s being used in Max Performance mode.

After two hours of continual gaming in Trine 2 (which is arguably one of the most demanding games available right now) the SHIELD Tablet remains relatively cool to the touch. Granted, there is a hot spot over the K1 itself but we can see that NVIDIA’s internal heatsink design is able to disperse the heat across several square inches. The hottest section never went above 56°C while the area directly behind the battery was only slightly warm.

One thing to remember is that putting the SHIELD Tablet into a case, skin or other third party holster (should they become available) could drastically increase these metrics. With that in mind, we would recommend letting the SHIELD breathe when gaming in an upright position to insure optimal performance.
 

SKYMTL

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Conclusion; So Much More Than a Tablet

Conclusion


When NVIDIA SHIELD Portable was released, there was no shortage of dissenting voices that claimed it would never be successful or widely accepted. While success is a hard thing to measure, the SHIELD did become the de facto standard for any serious Android gaming while also providing a solid platform for streamed PC games. More importantly, it laid a solid foundation for today’s SHIELD Tablet, insuring technologies had a chance to mature before NVIDIA launched their next generation device.

The SHIELD Tablet is a hard device to classify. On one hand it is a flagship Android tablet with a fittingly high price but on the other hand it is actually so much more. GameStream, GRID support, PC navigation and so many other features have been rolled into this device that some will consider it a gaming-only solution. But at the same time it can provide a perfectly good tablet experience, something the original SHIELD could never accomplish due to its purpose-built design.

One of the key components of any good tablet is portability and the SHIELD has that covered. Its slim, sharp lines may not make for the most ergonomically perfect experience known to man but the soft-touch back and 8” form factor may it infinitely more portable than some Android-only alternatives. This is a well built device that performs just as well as it looks.

Battery life was very good with four straight hours of gaming in Trine 2 or nearly a day of mixed browsing, gaming and basic app use. Since all but a small token amount of processing is done on the host PC during GameStream, we were easily able to achieve 5 hours playing PC games. In addition, there wasn’t any noticeable battery consumption increase when using the SHIELD Controller. Anyone who thinks a purpose-built tablet like this one will sacrifice battery life will have their beliefs changed dramatically after a few hours with the SHIELD.


In order to create a widely accepted ecosystem for their unique devices, NVIDIA has been hard at work on creating a backbone of certified apps and associated device features. This effort has led to none of the SHIELD Tablet’s primary features feeling half-assed or incomplete. Unlike other companies that wait for third party support that never really materializes, NVIDIA is building a name for themselves by innovating and then directly investing in any resulting technologies’ long-term support. A great example of this is ShadowPlay. The Kepler architecture’s hardware encoder was begging to be utilized and ShadowPlay does exactly that by providing a key feature for the gaming community.

By and large performance was more than adequate for gaming but there were some areas where the SHIELD Tablet exhibited some hiccups. There's a noticeably lag between rotating it and the screen transitions to the new orientation. There was also some unusual stuttering and hesitation in the main menus. In both instances it seems like optimization was simply lacking so a few more updates could iron things out nicely.

The main hurdle facing many gamers when making a decision about the SHIELD Tablet will likely be cost. By themselves neither the 16GB WiFi nor 32GB LTE models are overly expensive considering their wide range of uses but when you add the controller and cover the price increases by $100. That’s a hefty amount to pay for two accessories that are downright essential for getting the most out of your new SHIELD.

Unlike the original SHIELD Portable which was as a pure gaming device, the SHIELD Tablet is infinitely more adaptable. It performs equally well as a standard tablet as it does as a gaming device and therein lies its appeal to both enthusiasts and casual gamers alike. NVIDIA has no doubt been preparing for this launch ever since their original SHIELD was rolled out since everything about this particular iteration feels polished and well designed. While there may be a few areas where some improvement would be welcome, the SHIELD Tablet is and will likely remain the only multi disciplinary device on the market. It really is a technological achievement which is part of an enticing ecosystem that will likely grow even further in the near future.

 
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