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when building a server, when shoud you pay the extra for SAS drives over SATA?

Mr. Friendly

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working on a small exchange server for 10 users. It's going to have a 5x 2TB RAID 5 array with hot spare.

my understanding has been that the technology SAS offers is only taken advantage of when you have a very large array of drives moving a lot of data.

also, I doubt 5x SATA drives in RAID 5 would saturate the available bandwidth, let alone the 12Gb you'd get with a SAS controller.

please ejumicate me. :)

I know the cost difference between SAS and SATA drives had dropped substantially, but when you're building an OEM server, they still charge a chunk. :p
 

Izerous

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From a platter perspective speed and MTB failure can be a concern and at 2TB capacities your no where near top tier quality products there is a lot of cheap garbage at this capacity in the standard sata market where MTB/Speed is a factor.

From a SSD perspective your well into enthusiast / business only products and SATA vs SAS is likely less of a concern when accounting for MTB / speed as they will be a lot closer.
 

Entz

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Drives and crap is where they make their money. The markup is indeed insane.

Anyways regarding SAS. The primary benefits of SAS are, in my opinion:
- Better error handling and recovery
- Multipath support
- Better speed

For 99% of uses I would argue none of that matters. Especially with spinning rust. Most users wont be running redundant controllers let alone true multipath (literally 2 separate computers each one connected to a port in a failover config).

The speed technically can mater, being both full duplex and a wider pipe. This can be super useful if you are running an expander backplane or a bunch of SSDs but again... most people are not running a bunch of SSDs. I would argue that the vast majority of "cheap" SAS drives are nearline which are just SATA disks with a SAS interface. True proper enterprise SAS drives, typically 10-15k RPM, are not cheap usually and are small. At that point use SSDs.

edit: Drunk spelling
 
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lowfat

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For rust spinners, never IMO. Every brand has enterprise level SATA drives now.

But FYI, 5 drives in a RAID5 is a bad idea these days. And why 2TB drives? IMO it would make more sense to do a 2x8TB mirror of you don't need a lot of space.
 

supaflyx3

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working on a small exchange server for 10 users. It's going to have a 5x 2TB RAID 5 array with hot spare.

my understanding has been that the technology SAS offers is only taken advantage of when you have a very large array of drives moving a lot of data.

also, I doubt 5x SATA drives in RAID 5 would saturate the available bandwidth, let alone the 12Gb you'd get with a SAS controller.

please ejumicate me. :)

I know the cost difference between SAS and SATA drives had dropped substantially, but when you're building an OEM server, they still charge a chunk. :p
SAS is only 12gb if you use multipath. Under normal circumstances (sounds like what you're trying to accomplish) they would run at 6gbps. 12gb multipath is really only useful for SSDs as the highest performing HDDs top out at around 280MB/s
 

JD

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Wouldn't o365 be cheaper for 10 people? E1 license would run about $100/month for 10 people and they'd get 50GB mailboxes, 1TB OneDrive, Teams, SharePoint, etc. G Suite would come in even cheaper, around $80/month, but you don't get as much.

Seems a bit silly to host your own Exchange for such a small company as you'll incur all the license fees for Exchange + SQL + Windows Server while having to maintain the hardware/software as well.
 

supaflyx3

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Wouldn't o365 be cheaper for 10 people? E1 license would run about $100/month for 10 people and they'd get 50GB mailboxes, 1TB OneDrive, Teams, SharePoint, etc. G Suite would come in even cheaper, around $80/month, but you don't get as much.

Seems a bit silly to host your own Exchange for such a small company as you'll incur all the license fees for Exchange + SQL + Windows Server while having to maintain the hardware/software as well.
Gsuite business includes unlimited storage, I use it to backup my NAS. There's people that have nearly 1PB of "backups" on a single gsuite account
 

Mr. Friendly

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legal firm...so confidentiality, can't have it in the cloud.

the cost of an HPE branded 8TB HDD would cause a stroke...and they only need 6TB of usable space.

it's what has proven to work and the cost to change would be costly, so they will go with what's known.
 

Entz

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If this isn't your system, or your money, the I would go with nearline SAS drives assuming the price isn't massively different (some Seagate's are like 20-30$, RE4's a bit more). There are minor benefits. This is assuming you are getting a SAS controller to boot.

If your talking Dell HPE then is this preconfigured? If so then there may be some benefits to paying the "enterprise" tax and having it all covered under a warranty plan. Especially with RAID5, I wouldn't risk company data over waiting 1 week for amazon or something to ship you a drive.
 

lcdguy

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Since your talking about exchange which can be heavy on disk and memory usage. I believe Microsoft has publicly available "calculators" where it can estimate expected loads. It might be best to put the numbers into one of those to see what kind performance you need before buying any hardware and finding it's not sufficient.

Though for only 10 mail users Enterprise SATA or NL-SAS is likely more than enough disk performance.

But definitely go with a solution from a trusted vendor in the server market so you get the support you need when parts fail. I have worked with most of the big players (ibm, hpe, dell) By far i prefer HPE and IBM over dell.
 
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