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Wifi for desktop?

fubar

Well-known member
Joined
Jan 18, 2012
Messages
528
I am looking for a budget wifi device for the desktop. It's just for when I connect another desktop via internet that doesn't have wifi. I sometimes get computers that need fixing or troubleshooting. I'm tired of switching the ethernet cable. :)

It would be convenient to have them both connected.

However, I am not sure which device to get. I thought a pci-e card. I also thought Intel is probably the safest bet for support and choice? I also use Linux so maybe it's good for that, too? I only have a -G router at the moment (with Tomato) but I plan on getting an AC router when money allows. :)

For now, I guess I'll get a cheap -N card. I am not sure what's good though and with Intel cards, there's so many. The most recent card is the 7260 AC but it's really expensive. I noticed, on ebay, that there are desktop versions for the 7260, 2200-N, 1000, 6205, 6235 and so on. Can someone advise and/or suggest something?
 

SugarJ

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Why buy something you'll have to install into another computer while you're testing it? A wireless -N USB dongle is the way to go. I use the Asus USB-N13 on a couple machines at work with no issues.
 

fubar

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Joined
Jan 18, 2012
Messages
528
Why buy something you'll have to install into another computer while you're testing it? A wireless -N USB dongle is the way to go. I use the Asus USB-N13 on a couple machines at work with no issues.
I have a desktop and sometimes, I have other computers that I troubleshoot or install software on. I only have one ethernet cable and really don't want to connect other cables anyway. :)

So, I thought having a PCI/PCI-e wifi card will allow for a good connection and maybe stronger signal plus more reliable than a usb wifi adapter? Also, I use Linux,too, and it's difficult to find a good usb adapter because you are mostly stuck with only a few chipsets to choose from - often, the controversial realtek. :) That is, it's either good or problematic.

I think the N13 is a realtek. It should work, though. When you say you have no issues, what do you mean? Doesn't it depend where the router and computers are or anything like that?

But, your point is good. I don't need the wireless all the time but I thought a solution that is in the computer will provide a stronger wireless connection. It also lets me get an Intel chipset.

P.S. just in case, there's any confusion, it would be full-time in my desktop. The other computers will be connected via the ethernet cable... I'd only troubleshoot one at a time. But, I like mine connected all the time as I prefer to use it for downloading or whatever.
 

SugarJ

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Messages
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Location
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Ahh, I thought this was for your testing machines, not for your personal machine.

And to clarify, I use the N13's for full time network/internet access on a couple of Win7 desktops in a space where we don't have ethernet cables run. They work well, but all wireless connections crap out from time to time in my experience.

Why not just grab a 4-port switch and a couple of patch cables? You'll be way happier occasionally plugging in another cable (which you'd be doing anyway with your plan) than using a wireless connection full time, IMO. I've got one under my desk for when I'm working on other machines here.

If you're dead set on a PCI-E wireless card, I haven't used any in a couple of years so I don't have any recommendations for you.
 

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